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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Robert A. Henning and Terrence H. Witkowski

– This article aims to document and analyze how E. Remington & Sons built a valuable firearms brand through its advertising in the period 1854-1888.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to document and analyze how E. Remington & Sons built a valuable firearms brand through its advertising in the period 1854-1888.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses qualitative methods. Primary source documents include newspapers, journals, and catalogs. The advertising analyzed came primarily from three periodicals – Harper's Weekly, The Army Navy Journal, and American Agriculturalist – that together reached a broad audience of American firearms consumers.

Findings

Advertising to both civilian and military markets, Remington used a number of appeals including expert testimonials, fears of robbery and home invasion, and boasts of quality, military contracts, and honors from shooting competitions. Until the late 1870s, Remington used manufacturer's advertising more than its competitors.

Originality/value

Business historians have not seriously addressed Remington or other gun advertising and branding during the nineteenth century, while firearms historians have largely relegated these ads and other promotional ephemera to illustrative accessory roles, not as subjects of independent consideration. By investigating the rise of this important firearms brand, the research sheds light on the evolution of the American firearms industry and the prevailing gun culture.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Eric J. Bolland

Abstract

Details

Comprehensive Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-225-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

Ralph De Sola

Here is the long‐awaited fourth edition of Ralph De Sola's classic Abbreviations Dictionary. This updated edition of a work first published in 1958 is the largest, most…

Abstract

Here is the long‐awaited fourth edition of Ralph De Sola's classic Abbreviations Dictionary. This updated edition of a work first published in 1958 is the largest, most complete compilation of its kind — a reference book far surpassing all others in the field. Mr. De Sola has expanded his work to include more than 130,000 definitions and entries — over 77,000 definitions, over 54,000 entries. The current edition offers abbreviations, acronyms, anonyms, contradictions, initials and nicknames, short forms and slang shortcuts, and signs and symbols covering disciplines which range from the arts to the advanced sciences and embrace all areas of human knowledge and activity.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Terrence H. Witkowski

This study aims to present a history and critical analysis of arms and armor collecting in America from the late 19th century until the present day.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a history and critical analysis of arms and armor collecting in America from the late 19th century until the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws from the literature on arms and armor, from primary written, visual and material evidence, and from the author’s long experience as an antique gun and sword collector.

Findings

American arms and armor collectors have included men of great wealth, museums and their curators and many enthusiasts of more modest means. Collectors, dealers and curators have created a substantial arms literature. Collectors have organized around various types of artifacts, historical periods and company brands. Dealers, auction houses and manufacturers have provisioned the market with period pieces and reproductions.

Originality/value

The history of antique arms and armor collecting is regarded as a social activity where enthusiasts have pursued “serious leisure” through consumption and brand communities. This history is further analyzed as a cultural practice wherein generations of collectors have interpreted the meaning of antique arms and armor.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Julius Wachtel

There is agreement in the literature that offenders often acquire guns through unregulated private encounters with friends, family members and petty criminals. Although…

Abstract

There is agreement in the literature that offenders often acquire guns through unregulated private encounters with friends, family members and petty criminals. Although anecdotes suggest that licensed gun dealers also play a role, most studies have ignored or discounted the possibility that dishonest retailers are a significant source of supply. This effort explores gun markets in Los Angeles by examining the redistributive history of firearms seized by police and by reviewing Federal gun trafficking investigations. One finding, that corrupt licensed dealers diverted sizeable quantities of guns to end users and to unlicensed street vendors, suggests that retail sources may serve as a far more important source of firearms for criminals than is commonly supposed.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Gianni Pirelli and Philip Witt

Although cultural competence is gaining increased attention among mental health practitioners, such primarily has centered on race, religion, ethnicity, language, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Although cultural competence is gaining increased attention among mental health practitioners, such primarily has centered on race, religion, ethnicity, language, and nationality. Thus far, there has been relatively little recognition of specific socialized subcultures aside from the aforementioned groups, and virtually no discussion regarding those associated with various firearm-related subcultures. This topic is particularly relevant to mental health practitioners, as positions on firearm use and ownership frequently split across political party lines, and mental health professionals and academics are more likely to espouse liberal rather than conservative views. It follows that practitioners may understand little about firearms culture and, therefore, are at increased risk for biased decision making when working with clients for whom firearms have relevance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a conceptual approach to reviewing potential areas of bias in both clinical and clinical-forensic practice in the US context.

Findings

The authors detail the prevalence of firearm-related issues in the USA, contextualize firearm-related issues in forensic treatment and evaluation scenarios, delineate a number of firearm subgroups, and recommend considerations for mental health professionals to develop cultural competence as it relates to firearms and associated subcultures.

Originality/value

This is an original conceptual study of cultural competence and various firearm-related subcultures.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2013

Jon Littlefield

The discussion about firearms in the United States often involves a contentious confrontation between two polarized groups: gun owners and those that might increase…

Abstract

Purpose

The discussion about firearms in the United States often involves a contentious confrontation between two polarized groups: gun owners and those that might increase regulation of guns. The former group often uses rights-based arguments, including the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, while the latter assesses problems related to gun violence from a collectivist perspective, focusing on the health, social, and policy implications of firearm ownership. The National Rifle Association (NRA) adds to the mix through communicating and lobbying activities.

Methodology

The chapter uses qualitative data and interpretive methods to gain an in-depth insight into the values of the gun culture and the role of the NRA in this community. Data used are from nine depth interviews with gun owners and field notes derived from participant observation in addition to examination of email communications sent by the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action.

Findings

Three significant values espoused by members of the culture – self-sufficiency, safety, and privacy – are based on the individualist perspective and this perspective is reinforced by public narrative provided by the NRA.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is the geographic limitation on data collection, although it is expected that rural gun culture does not vary significantly throughout the United States. The study has implications for a more nuanced understanding of the gun debate in the United States by suggesting how the narrative is structured by lobbying groups such as the NRA.

Originality/value of paper

This chapter provides insight into the U.S. gun culture that has not been previously addressed through a consumer culture theory lens.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-811-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Terrence H. Witkowski

This chapter fosters understanding of core U.S. gun culture and how it promotes its political ideology through visual means.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter fosters understanding of core U.S. gun culture and how it promotes its political ideology through visual means.

Methodology

The research applies key visual theory concepts to investigate a selection of political representations made by gun rights advocates. The images analyzed include photographs, posters, and other ephemera posted on blogs and commercial websites located through informed keyword searches of Google Images.

Findings

Core gun culture in the U.S. aggressively promotes its libertarian and right-wing ideology through tactics of interpellation, intertextuality, and exhibitionism, often in tandem with humor, sarcasm, paranoia, and sex appeals.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings are preliminary, visual theories and methodologies present a promising direction for further consumer research on American gun culture.

Social implications

U.S. gun culture produces levels of gun violence that far exceed those in other developed countries. Knowledge of how the core gun culture represents itself visually may deliver insights for mitigating this social problem.

Originality

Relatively little consumer culture research has addressed U.S. gun culture and visual theories have not been fully deployed.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-811-2

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 15 August 2017

Inflows of illegal weapons to the Caribbean.

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

John Goodier

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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