Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Fiona Sherwood-Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to consider independent advocates’ perspectives on their roles in Scottish adult support and protection (ASP) work, and the facilitators and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider independent advocates’ perspectives on their roles in Scottish adult support and protection (ASP) work, and the facilitators and barriers impacting on these roles in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 managers and staff from six independent advocacy agencies operating across nine local authority areas.

Findings

Participants described key roles in supporting individuals to understand their rights and to negotiate ASP processes. They conceptualised their independence to be the key distinguishing feature of their role. Participants noted lower than expected rates of referral of ASP concerns to advocacy and variable experiences of communication with the statutory services. Particular emphasis was placed on the late stage at which many referrals are received. Awareness, understanding and acceptance of advocacy amongst the statutory services was felt to vary at both practice and strategic levels.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not a representative one. However, some commonalities are worthy of note: particularly the participants’ commitment to ASP work and the perceived impact of statutory agencies on their involvement in it. The issue of late referrals merits some consideration at a national level. Issues of awareness and understanding amongst the statutory services, and their links with referral rates, are for further local-level exploration. The independent advocacy community might wish to discuss further the impacts on them of incorporation into statutory frameworks.

Originality/value

Advocacy perspectives have been little drawn on in pre-existing ASP research.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Fiona Sherwood‐Johnson, Beth Cross and Brigid Daniel

The purpose of the paper is to discuss how adult support and protection (ASP) work might support or further damage an adult's strengths, skills and sense of self. There is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to discuss how adult support and protection (ASP) work might support or further damage an adult's strengths, skills and sense of self. There is a particular focus on adults who require some support with decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

Forum theatre and other creative techniques were used to discuss ASP with 42 people who access support. A range of advice for practitioners was generated, a portion of which is reported here. The research design was participatory, with ten people who access support being members of the research team.

Findings

ASP work can support or undermine an adult's strengths, skills and sense of self, depending on the way it is performed. Three inter‐locking themes are presented to illustrate this finding. First, participants thought it might be intimidating to be “singled out”, and wished to be understood in the context of their relationships. Second, ASP was thought likely to be experienced as a judgement on the person and their problem‐solving skills. Third, people wanted to be “really listened to” and acknowledged as a person with preferences and strengths.

Practical implications

It is important for practitioners to be mindful of the process of ASP work, as well as of its outcomes. Ways must be found to keep the person central, and to maintain and develop their strengths and sense of self.

Originality/value

The perspectives of adults actually or potentially affected by ASP have been under‐researched. This study adds substantially to the available evidence.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Downloads
84

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

1 – 3 of 3