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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Lois Marjorie Hazelton, Laurence Murray Gillin, Fiona Kerr, Alison Kitson and Noel Lindsay

Within the “wicked” concept of ageing, this paper aims to primarily model an integrated approach to identifying and evaluating opportunities that deliver innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the “wicked” concept of ageing, this paper aims to primarily model an integrated approach to identifying and evaluating opportunities that deliver innovative outcomes in Ageing Well Practice, Health and Economic Policy and Research Actions using a collaborative and entrepreneurial mindset. The strategic focus is on a “Boomer” (user)-driven and facilitated Network – that brings together health professionals, research specialists, technologists, ageing well providers, “encore” career specialists, life-style providers, community groups, wealth creation specialists and industry innovators to streamline the progression of identified concepts to valued users and markets and enhance the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the unit of analysis for innovation, i.e. the “added-value” as perceived by the user and not simply a product or a technology, the identified “opportunity-outcome” will embed a new service concept or intervention, which embraces and promotes ageing well, independent living or resident-centred care in the community and delivers direct and indirect economic benefits.

Findings

The authors model a point of differentiation in facilitating existing ageing well policies in the community, through a focus on an integrated and multi-dimensional collaborative framework that can deliver user value and contributes to community and economic benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Generalising results without a commercial business case from this single strategic viewpoint requires caution. The positive outcomes from this innovation collaborative concept can be used to guide further policy development and business investment in ageing well needs.

Practical implications

Such an integrated innovation collaborative structure provides the capacity to identify ageing well opportunities, to contract enterprises, both SMEs’ and larger companies, for development of the opportunities into user-valued outcomes, to network venture resources and deliver these outcomes to a sustainable market of ageing well citizens.

Social implications

The Ageing Well Innovation collaborative framework identifies practical ways to integrate new concepts of ageing participation to be realised by the increasing number of “Boomers”. It provides a self-managing process for linking individuals, public and private parties to maximise information and ideas flow, and engagement of the skilled resources in the Boomer group.

Originality/value

The innovation collaborative structure proposed is not simply novel but is a targeted focus on entrepreneurship and innovation applied strategically to the needs of ageing boomers and community needs. The added-value is in the demonstrated enhancement to effective innovation outcomes in community ageing and the economy.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Debbie Kemmer

This paper examines the domestic division of labour in relation to food preparation in the early months of marriage/cohabitation. A total of 22 heterosexual couples from…

Abstract

This paper examines the domestic division of labour in relation to food preparation in the early months of marriage/cohabitation. A total of 22 heterosexual couples from central Scotland, all childless and in full‐time employment or education took part in in‐depth interviews shortly after setting up home together. In more than half of the cases, the woman prepared most of the main meals, seven couples took equal part in food preparation and in two cases the man was the main meal preparer. There was evidence of role conflict among those women who prepared most of the meals, and of a trade‐off between the disadvantage of the tasks’ burdens and the advantage of control over food choice. This represents a significant departure from earlier work on food preparation in households with dependent children, in which men rarely cooked main meals, and women showed little evidence of resentment and considerable deference to their partners’ tastes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Alice Allan and Simon Rowlands

This paper aims to investigate parents' beliefs about the causes of their child's Type 1 diabetes to understand if this affects the way diagnosis is processed and if this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate parents' beliefs about the causes of their child's Type 1 diabetes to understand if this affects the way diagnosis is processed and if this impacts on sibling parenting.

Design/methodology/approach

Online, semi-structured qualitative interviews with nine parents of children with Type 1 diabetes who have at least one non-diabetic child. The results were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Two interlinked themes were identified: “What ifs”: parents postulated underlying genetic reasons for their child's diabetes and had working theories about the triggers of diabetes that included stress, infection, vaccination or a virus. Developing a personal aetiology of their child's condition allowed some a feeling of control, while others focused on practical ways to manage diabetes. “Having something to blame”: narratives dwelt on the relationship between beliefs about causes and self-blame. Some believed that acting on an identified trigger reduced personal guilt.

Research limitations/implications

Although internet access is widespread in the UK, a limitation of this research is that it excluded those without internet access.

Practical implications

The findings of this research may provide greater depth and a more holistic perspective to the health promoter to better support parents of Type 1 diabetics.

Social implications

The analysis of illness narratives that this research provides may offer a greater understanding of the social context in which health and illness develop. This research found some examples of parental confidence about the causes and triggers of their child's diabetes being positively associated with a sense of control. This might indicate the value of a more comprehensive larger-scale study to establish whether parents who are supported to develop a personalised conception of the aetiology of their child's diabetes develop a greater sense of coherence and well-being regarding their child's condition.

Originality/value

There is very limited literature focusing on the beliefs of sufferers and their families about Type 1 diabetes causality. Of that which does exist, some research is heterogenous in its sampling of Types 1 and 2 diabetes sufferers. This study offers a rare, focused insight into the beliefs of parents about the background causes and more proximal triggers of their child's Type 1 diabetes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Brian Kerr

The telecare development programme in Scotland has just published four practice and training guides1 designed to promote the effective and ethical use of telecare for…

Abstract

The telecare development programme in Scotland has just published four practice and training guides1 designed to promote the effective and ethical use of telecare for people with differing needs. This article summarises the background to this initiative and the content. Several issues ‐ such as the focus on ‘specialist’ areas of need, the generic content and the apparent demand for this kind of publication ‐ are discussed. The article concludes with some ideas for further publications, and reflection on the potential for converting these texts into an e‐learning resource.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Robert Crawford and Ruth Spence‐Stone

This paper seeks to develop a clearer understanding of the operations and decisions made by Australian advertising standards bodies, the Advertising Standards Council and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to develop a clearer understanding of the operations and decisions made by Australian advertising standards bodies, the Advertising Standards Council and its successor, the Advertising Standards Board. It also seeks to identify whose interests have been served by these advertising standards organisations – those of the public or those of the advertising industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Using annual reports and reports in mainstream press outlets, this paper compares the two advertising standards bodies, their respective organisational structures, and their decisions, in order to identify the key issues that have confronted Australia's advertising regulation bodies.

Findings

In addition to demonstrating the fundamental similarities between the Advertising Standards Council and the Advertising Standards Board, this paper raises serious questions about self‐regulation and the way that it serves the advertising industry's interests ahead of the public interest.

Originality/value

This is the first long‐term comparative survey of the operations, activities and decisions of the Advertising Standards Council and the Advertising Standards Board that also reveals the fundamental shortcomings of the current advertising standards codes.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Chris Hallinan and Steven Jackson

This chapter adopts a reflective approach exploring and setting out the contrasting factors that led to the establishment of the subdiscipline in both countries. The…

Abstract

This chapter adopts a reflective approach exploring and setting out the contrasting factors that led to the establishment of the subdiscipline in both countries. The factors included the role of key individuals and their respective academic backgrounds and specialisations within each country’s higher education system. Furthermore, attention is given to the particular circumstances in a case analysis comparison of the oldest programs in Aotearoa/New Zealand and Australia. This sheds light upon the factors linked to the disproportionate success profile for the sociology of sport in Aotearoa/New Zealand. An analysis of scholars and programs within each country reveals important differences aligned with the politics of funding and the variety and extent of systematic structures. Additionally, scholars’ specialisations and preferences reveal a broad offering but are primarily linked to globalisation, gender relations, indigeneity and race relations, social policy, and media studies. This work has been undertaken variously via the critical tradition including Birmingham School cultural studies, ethnographic and qualitative approaches and, more recently by some, a postmodern poststructuralist trend. Lastly, along with a brief discussion of current issues, future challenges are set out.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Fiona Mackay and Claire Wilson

Janette1 is a young woman with both a mild intellectual disability and moderate physical disabilities who experienced a major depressive disorder at a stage in her life…

Abstract

Janette1 is a young woman with both a mild intellectual disability and moderate physical disabilities who experienced a major depressive disorder at a stage in her life when many young adults leave home. This case study exemplifies the success of a multi‐disciplinary, multi‐agency and multi‐element intervention for severe depression in relation to the tasks of adolescence. The impact of a combination of treatments (including attendance at an assessment day unit, electro‐convulsive therapy (ECT) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)) on Janette's mood has been assessed regularly using the Glasgow Depression Inventory ‐ Learning Disability (GDS‐LD) scale (Cuthill, 2003). There is currently very little literature on either using ECT with people with learning disabilities or assessing depression in this population. The multiple inputs, in Janette's case, have had the desired effect of greatly improving her mood, which has been sustained via outpatient follow‐up and tailoring of day and respite services.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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