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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Fiona Graetz

In an environment characterised by flux and uncertainty, a capacity for innovative, divergent strategic thinking rather than conservative, convergent strategic planning is…

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Abstract

In an environment characterised by flux and uncertainty, a capacity for innovative, divergent strategic thinking rather than conservative, convergent strategic planning is seen as central to creating and sustaining competitive advantage. As the case study of Communications Co. illustrates, scenario planning is one tool that many organisations, committed to redesigning their strategic planning processes, are using with some success. However, scenario planning requires both left‐ and right‐brain thinking styles. The elements of left‐brain thinking reflect the planning side of strategy making, while right‐brain thinking mirrors the thinking component of strategy making. The relationship between the factors that enable strategic thinking and the level of “emotional intelligence” of business leaders is also considered. The Communications Co. case findings appear to support the view that while strategic thinking capabilities can be nurtured and diffused through an organisation, it will need business leaders with a high degree of emotional intelligence to lead the way.

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Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Fiona Graetz

Against a backdrop of increasing globalisation, deregulation, and the rapid pace of technological innovation, the primary task of management today is the leadership of…

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27873

Abstract

Against a backdrop of increasing globalisation, deregulation, and the rapid pace of technological innovation, the primary task of management today is the leadership of organisational change. Seeks to examine the role of leadership in managing the challenge of deliberate large‐scale change and whether it is possible to pinpoint factors that are critical to leading change effectively. Also investigates the view that effective change leadership involves instrumental and charismatic roles, integrating operational know‐how with strong interpersonal skills. Uses a qualitative, case study approach, involving three multinational companies operating in Australia. Cross‐case analysis indicates that effective change leaders recognise the importance of blending the charismatic and instrumental dimensions of change leadership. The ability to conciliate and balance the two roles depends primarily on whether a leader possesses certain qualities and attributes required for effective change leadership. Strong interpersonal skills permeate these key change leadership qualities and attributes and provide the nexus between the charismatic and instrumental roles.

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Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Aaron C.T. Smith and Fiona Graetz

The purpose of this paper is to describe how order‐generated rules applied to organizing form dualities can assist in creating the conditions for emergent, self‐organized…

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5176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how order‐generated rules applied to organizing form dualities can assist in creating the conditions for emergent, self‐organized behavior in organizations, thereby offering an operational deployment of complexity theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by showing that the concept of dualities is consistent with complexity‐thinking. In addition, when applied to organizing forms, dualities represent a practical way of affecting an organization's balance between chaos and order. Thus, when augmented with order‐generating rules, organizing form dualities provide an access point for the practical instigation of edge of chaos conditions and the potential for emergence.

Findings

The paper maintains that many attempts to “manage” complexity have been associated with changes to organizing forms, specifically toward new forms of organizing. It is suggested that organizing form dualities provide some management guidance for encouraging the “edge of chaos” conditions advocated in complexity theory, although the details of self‐organization cannot be prescribed given the assumptions of non‐linearity associated with complexity theory perspectives. Finally, it is proposed that organizing dualities can elucidate the nature and application of order‐generating rules in non‐linear complex systems.

Practical implications

Dualities offer some guidance toward the practical implementation of complexity theory as they represent an accessible sub‐system where the forces for order and chaos – traditional and new forms of organizing respectively – are accessible and subject to manipulation.

Originality/value

The commonalities between dualities and complexity theory are intuitive, but little conceptual work has shown how the former can be employed as a guide to managing organizing forms. Moreover, this approach demonstrates that managers may be able to stimulate “edge of chaos” conditions in a practical way, without making positivistic assumptions about the causality associated with their efforts.

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Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Globalization, deregulation, and a growing knowledge workforce have radically altered the role of the modern manager. The ability to lead organizational change is no…

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845

Abstract

Globalization, deregulation, and a growing knowledge workforce have radically altered the role of the modern manager. The ability to lead organizational change is no longer a nice‐to‐have skill but a necessity. And as companies abandon traditional, hierarchies in favor of the flatter, more flexible structures, senior management has shifted from the authoritarian, command and control style, to the open, collaborative approach.

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Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Cecily Knight

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for resilience education that can be used by teachers in schools. The paper seeks to identify a common language for…

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5529

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for resilience education that can be used by teachers in schools. The paper seeks to identify a common language for exploring the concept of resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of the construct of resilience as it appears in the literature. It provides a rationale for resilience education by examining the changing circumstances that impact on the work of educators. It also provides an overview of current Australian programs that promote resilience.

Findings

After an extensive examination of the literature, it is suggested that resilience is discussed in the literature as a state, a condition and a practice. Consequently, a three‐dimensional framework has been developed from this to help teachers understand resilience and to provide practical ways in which they can promote the resilience of their learners.

Practical implications

This conceptual paper suggests that the three‐dimensional framework for resilience has implications for supporting the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people. The paper highlights the important role of the school in enhancing resilience for children and young people.

Originality/value

The original work of this paper is the presentation of a three‐dimensional framework for resilience: as a state, a condition and a practice. This framework is useful for preservice teacher education programs and for the professional development of practising teachers.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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