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Abstract

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Ruth Edwards, Richard Williams, Nisha Dogra, Michelle O'Reilly and Panos Vostanis

Specialist CAMHS provide skilled assessment and interventions for children, young people and their families who have mental health disorders. The training needs of the…

Abstract

Specialist CAMHS provide skilled assessment and interventions for children, young people and their families who have mental health disorders. The training needs of the staff who work in specialist CAMHS are not always clear or prioritised, due to the complexities and differing contexts in which specialist CAMHS are provided. The aim of this paper was to establish stakeholders' experiences of service complexities and challenges that affect training within specialist CAMHS. The project employed interviews to gain wide‐ranging consultation with key stakeholder groups. The sample consisted of 45 participants recruited from policy departments, professional bodies, higher education providers, commissioners, service managers, and practitioners. The participants identified a number of themes that limit training, and put forward solutions on how these could be facilitated in the future. Emerging themes related to leadership and the role of service managers, strategic management of training, commissioning, levels of staff training, resources, impact of training on service users, and availability of training programmes. The findings emphasise the need for the strategic workforce planning of training to meet service delivery goals. Policy, commissioning, workforce training strategies, service needs, and delivery of training should be integrated and closely linked.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Jessica Gale, Jane Clarbour and Kelly Rayner

Literature suggests that mentally disordered offenders are considerably more difficult to treat and slower to respond to psychological treatment. Less is known about the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature suggests that mentally disordered offenders are considerably more difficult to treat and slower to respond to psychological treatment. Less is known about the particular factors that can contribute to this resistance. A more comprehensive understanding of the factors that treating psychologists feel can promote or inhibit progression through rehabilitative treatment may increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Four practising psychologists employed within a male medium- and low-secure forensic unit in the North East of England took part in a semi-structured interview. Their views, opinions and experiences regarding patient progression through treatment pathways were recorded, transcribed and analysed.

Findings

This thematic analysis identified that numerous patient-specific parameters influenced perceived progression, and environmental and external factors had a significant impact on the patients’ expressed attitude towards treatment.

Practical implications

Alongside issues of motivation and engagement, participants identified external factors that influence perceived treatment success with their forensic patients.

Originality/value

Additional research is needed to identify the factors that are the most influential in promoting or inhibiting perceived and actual progress. This will hopefully optimise treatment engagement and the motivation to change problematic behaviours in mentally disordered offenders.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Leslie de Chernatony, Fiona Harris and Francesca Dall’Olmo Riley

Much has been written about the strategic importance of added value as a means for achieving competitive advantage, but little attention has been paid to the meaning of…

Abstract

Much has been written about the strategic importance of added value as a means for achieving competitive advantage, but little attention has been paid to the meaning of the term “added value”. For the concept to realise its purported advantages, a better understanding of added value is crucial. To gain greater insight into the concept we undertook depth interviews with 20 leading‐edge brand experts to explore their views about the nature, roles and sustainability of added value. We conclude that added value is a multidimensional construct, playing diverse roles, and interpreted in different ways by different people. The more sustainable added values are the emotional values.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Fiona Lodge

At a time when pessimism is the prevailing mood and the outlook for Australian publishing is generally held to be uncertain, the Australian Bookseller and Publisher

Abstract

At a time when pessimism is the prevailing mood and the outlook for Australian publishing is generally held to be uncertain, the Australian Bookseller and Publisher reports a record number of 2,790 books published in Australia during 1980. This quantitative growth in production was complemented by improvements in the quality and in the diversity of the titles produced. The total figures for the last six years have been 1975: 2001, 1976: 1781, 1977: 2243, 1978: 2183, 1979: 2412 and 1980: 2790. This trend of steady growth in the volume of book production has been attributed to a number of factors. One is the continued expansion of educational publishing for the secondary and tertiary levels; another is that Australian publishers are finding themselves in an increasingly advantageous position compared with overseas publishers. The rise in prices of imported books due to increased costs of production overseas, unfavorable exchange rates, high postage and shipping costs, coupled with the aid of the Book Bounty, has meant that the smaller editions necessary for the small Australian market can be published at a price that competes reasonably favorably with the imported product.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Christian Beech and Fiona Verity

The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners providing services to older people…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners providing services to older people through the prism of how risk is assessed and managed. It proposes that whilst interprofessional and multidisciplinary working is a broad and commonly researched topic, there is a relative paucity of evidence specifically regarding how health and social care practitioners work together across structural, cultural and ideological divides. The study aims to expand the domain of integrated health and social care by including perceptions, understanding and use of the concept of risk by professionals from different disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon an exploratory study using an interpretivist phenomenological perspective, including 23 semi-structured individual interviews with health and social care practitioners and 2 non-participant observations of multidisciplinary team meetings.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights around the complex dynamics of interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners, in particular the saliency of the interconnectedness of individual practitioner Personalities with the Process of interprofessional and multidisciplinary working under the auspices of relevant Policy drivers.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in Wales and, due to the increasingly divergent policy context within the UK, the research results may lack generalisability from a wider UK or international perspective. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the propositions of this research further.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for both interprofessional and multidisciplinary policy and practice with older people. With new models of integrated care being sought, the findings of this study may offer a timely and valuable contribution, particularly from the inclusion of a social care perspective and in better understanding the interconnectedness of practitioner personalities with process and policy.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the complex dynamics and interconnectedness between health and social care practitioners who work together to provide services to older people.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1992

Bruce Curry, Luiz Moutinho and Fiona Davies

Originates from a research project which aims to investigate thepotential for “intelligent” computer models asdecision‐support tools, with particular emphasis on strategic…

Abstract

Originates from a research project which aims to investigate the potential for “intelligent” computer models as decision‐support tools, with particular emphasis on strategic analysis. Describes field work carried out with the intention of validating the working models which have been developed. The fieldwork produced a number of useful suggestions whereby the particular model could be enhanced, as well as demonstrating the potential for applying intelligent models in practice.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Joanna Minkiewicz, Kerrie Bridson and Jody Evans

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations collaborate with customers to facilitate consumption of cultural experiences through the lens of co-production. Although organisations are typically an integral part of the co-production process, co-production is typically considered from a consumer angle. Aligned with the service ecosystem perspective and value-in-cultural context, this research aims to provide greater insight into the processes and resources that institutions apply to co-produce experiences with consumers and the drivers and inhibitors of such processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research with three exemplar organisations, using in-depth interviews with key informants was used to investigate the processes organisations follow in co-producing the service experience with customers, as well as the drivers and inhibitors of organisational co-production of the service experience in the cultural sector.

Findings

The findings illuminate that cultural organisations are co-producing the service experience with their customers, as revealed through a number of key processes: inviting customers to actively participate in the experience, engaging customers and supporting customers in the co-production of the experience. Increasingly demanding consumers and a changing competitive landscape are strong external drivers of co-production. Visionary leadership and consumer-focussed employees are internal factors impelling organisations to co-produce experiences with consumers. A strong curatorial orientation, complex organisational structure, employee attitude and capability gaps and funding constraints are impediments towards organisations co-producing experiences with consumers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in Service-Dominant logic theory, arts/cultural marketing and broader services marketing literature by proposing a broadened conceptualisation of co-production of the service experience. This conceptualisation can be used as a platform to derive strategic imperatives for managers of service organisations. The findings highlight the key practices and resources that are central to organisations co-producing experience with customers. In this way, greater understanding of institutional logics and practices that underpin experience co-production emerges.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Alison Hicks

The purpose of this paper is to present the emergent grounded theory of mitigating risk, which was produced through an analysis of the information literacy practices of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the emergent grounded theory of mitigating risk, which was produced through an analysis of the information literacy practices of English-speakers who are learning a language overseas as part of their undergraduate degree.

Design/methodology/approach

The grounded theory emerges from a qualitative study that was framed by practice theory and transitions theory, and employed constructivist grounded theory, semi-structured interviews and photo-elicitation methods to explore the information activities of 26 language-learners from Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA.

Findings

The grounded theory of mitigating risk illustrates how academic, financial and physical risks that are produced through language-learner engagement overseas catalyse the enactment of information literacy practices that enable students to mediate their transition overseas.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s theory-building is localised and contextual rather than generalisable.

Practical implications

The grounded theory broadens librarians’ and language-educators’ knowledge of student activities during immersive educational experiences as well as extending understanding about the shape that information literacy takes within transition to a new intercultural context.

Social implications

The grounded theory develops understanding about the role that local communities play within intercultural transition and how these groups can respond to and prepare for increasingly fluid patterns of global movement.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an increasingly sophisticated theoretical conceptualisation of information literacy while further providing a detailed exploration of transition from an information perspective.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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