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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Diane Barrowclough and Fiona Ford

Many practising midwives feel neither confident nor competent to answer the nutritional concerns of pregnant women in their care. This study was designed to develop and evaluate a…

Abstract

Many practising midwives feel neither confident nor competent to answer the nutritional concerns of pregnant women in their care. This study was designed to develop and evaluate a nutrition open‐learning pack for practising midwives. A statistically significant increase (p < 0.001) in midwives’ nutrition knowledge scores was demonstrated following study of the nutrition open‐learning materials. Evaluation of the nutrition open‐learning materials was positive with constructive comments and suggestions being made for further development. Open learning is a time‐consuming activity that requires support from managers in terms of study time. As a strategy, open‐learning materials can be developed for whatever the topic and academic level required, which could encompass pre‐registration midwifery education, post‐graduate study and continuing professional development (CPD).

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Fiona Ford and Diane Barrowclough

In 1980, 8 per cent of women in the UK were classified as obese (body mass index over 30). By 1998, the prevalence of obesity had increased to 21 per cent and there is no sign…

1388

Abstract

In 1980, 8 per cent of women in the UK were classified as obese (body mass index over 30). By 1998, the prevalence of obesity had increased to 21 per cent and there is no sign that this upward trend is moderating. Many women retrospectively attribute the onset of their obesity to pregnancy, yet research in this area has yielded conflicting evidence. Unlike the USA, the UK does not have clinical guidelines for gestational weight gain. Health professionals such as GPs, midwives and obstetricians have a responsibility to monitor normal pregnancy, yet typically in the UK, women are weighed only once i.e. at the antenatal booking appointment, which is primarily undertaken for the interpretation of screening tests. This paper will review recent evidence relating gestational weight gain and maternal outcomes such as the burden of postpartum obesity and the risk of caesarean section. In addition, some practical advice is given for heath professionals to use when monitoring the weight gain of pregnant women in their care.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Hilary Dimond, Fiona Ford and Robert Fraser

Provides details on one of the functions of the Centre for PregnancyNutrition at the University of Sheffield, namely the running of anationwide helpline service (the “Eating for…

1237

Abstract

Provides details on one of the functions of the Centre for Pregnancy Nutrition at the University of Sheffield, namely the running of a nationwide helpline service (the “Eating for Pregnancy” Helpline). This service is available to the public, professionals working with pre‐pregnant, pregnant and lactating women, fellow researchers and the media, and provides information on all aspects of nutrition through pre‐pregnancy, pregnancy and lactation. Describes by whom the service has been used during the first 28 months of its existence (September 1991‐December 1993), a breakdown of the type of enquiries which have been received and, in the main, a summary of the advice which is given in response to the most common enquiries.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2008

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Fiona Graetz

Against a backdrop of increasing globalisation, deregulation, and the rapid pace of technological innovation, the primary task of management today is the leadership of…

29867

Abstract

Against a backdrop of increasing globalisation, deregulation, and the rapid pace of technological innovation, the primary task of management today is the leadership of organisational change. Seeks to examine the role of leadership in managing the challenge of deliberate large‐scale change and whether it is possible to pinpoint factors that are critical to leading change effectively. Also investigates the view that effective change leadership involves instrumental and charismatic roles, integrating operational know‐how with strong interpersonal skills. Uses a qualitative, case study approach, involving three multinational companies operating in Australia. Cross‐case analysis indicates that effective change leaders recognise the importance of blending the charismatic and instrumental dimensions of change leadership. The ability to conciliate and balance the two roles depends primarily on whether a leader possesses certain qualities and attributes required for effective change leadership. Strong interpersonal skills permeate these key change leadership qualities and attributes and provide the nexus between the charismatic and instrumental roles.

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Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange…

3491

Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Lorraine Dolan, Maria Kane, Fiona Timmins, Geraldine Prizeman and Orla Dempsey

Patients with extended hospital admissions had no recreation facilities in the ward. They were often confined to spaces around their beds, using the ward corridor for…

Abstract

Purpose

Patients with extended hospital admissions had no recreation facilities in the ward. They were often confined to spaces around their beds, using the ward corridor for rehabilitation. The purpose of this paper is to outline a quality improvement (QI) intervention-provision of a recreational space for long-stay patients.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory quantitative pre-, post-test design was utilised, and executed in three phases: patients, visitors and staff survey to explore recreation and comfort needs and preferences; store room refurbishment; and patient, visitor and staff satisfaction with the recreation room.

Findings

Overall, 77 questionnaires were completed (n=49 staff; n=28 patient/visitor). Almost two-thirds (64.7 per cent; n=11) of patients had a stay greater than six weeks. Insufficient private space and concerns about disturbing other patients were identified as barriers to taking part in activities. Consequently, a store room was refurbished as a recreation room (9.0 m × 6.0 m) and furnished in three distinct areas. Following refurbishment, over 90 per cent (n=24) of respondents agreed that there was a suitable space where patients could “go and chat” and spend time with family and visitors or speak to the healthcare team.

Practical implications

The physical environment in acute hospitals is seldom prioritised. Needs-based QI projects can improve patient hospital experiences.

Originality/value

This case study highlights how nursing staff can be informed by patients’ and families’ needs and preferences, and initiate QI projects that improve patient hospital experiences.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Nicholas Ford, Paul Trott and Christopher Simms

The purpose of this paper is to explore older people’s food consumption experiences. Specifically, the paper seeks to provide understanding on the influence of food intake on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore older people’s food consumption experiences. Specifically, the paper seeks to provide understanding on the influence of food intake on consumer vulnerability and how this manifests within people’s lives.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an interpretive, exploratory approach, using in-depth interviews with 20 older consumers in the UK. Thematic analysis is conducted, establishing patterns and contradictions with the data.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how biological, psychological and social age-related changes can contribute to reduced food intake in later life. The loss of control over one’s consumption experiences as a result of inappropriate portion sizes acts as a source of both immediate and future vulnerability. Resultant food wastage can serve as an immediate reminder of negative associates with ageing, while the accumulative effect of sustained under-consumption contributes to increased frailty. As a result, consumer vulnerability can pervade other contexts of an individual’s life.

Practical implications

The research reveals opportunities for firms to use packaging development to reduce experiences of consumer vulnerability through reduced apportionment of packaged food products. However, this needs to be considered within a multi-demographic marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by providing a unique lens with which to understand consumer vulnerability. The findings offer a developmental perspective on the experience of consumer vulnerability, revealing the stages of proximate, immediate, intermediate and ultimate vulnerability. This perspective has the potential to offer more detailed, nuanced insights into vulnerability in other contexts beyond food consumption.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Globalization, deregulation, and a growing knowledge workforce have radically altered the role of the modern manager. The ability to lead organizational change is no longer a…

848

Abstract

Globalization, deregulation, and a growing knowledge workforce have radically altered the role of the modern manager. The ability to lead organizational change is no longer a nice‐to‐have skill but a necessity. And as companies abandon traditional, hierarchies in favor of the flatter, more flexible structures, senior management has shifted from the authoritarian, command and control style, to the open, collaborative approach.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

1 – 10 of 89