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Article

Christine Cocker, Adi Cooper, Dez Holmes and Fiona Bateman

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for developing a Transitional Safeguarding approach to create an integrated paradigm for safeguarding young people that better meets their developmental needs and better reflects the nature of harms young people face.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the key principles of the Children Act 1989 and the Care Act 2014 and discusses their similarities and differences. It then introduces two approaches to safeguarding: Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP); and transitional safeguarding; that can inform safeguarding work with young people. Other legal frameworks that influence safeguarding practices, such as the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Human Rights Act 1998, are also discussed.

Findings

Safeguarding practice still operates within a child/adult binary; neither safeguarding system adequately meets the needs of young people. Transitional Safeguarding advocates an approach to working with young people that is relational, developmental and contextual. MSP focuses on the wishes of the person at risk from abuse or neglect and their desired outcomes. This is also central to a Transitional Safeguarding approach, which is participative, evidence informed and promotes equalities, diversity and inclusion.

Practical implications

Building a case for developing MSP for young people means that local partnerships could create the type of service that best meets local needs, whilst ensuring their services are participative and responsive to the specific safeguarding needs of individual young people.

Originality/value

This paper promotes applying the principles of MSP to safeguarding practice with young people. It argues that the differences between the children and adult legislative frameworks are not so great that they would inhibit this approach to safeguarding young people.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Martineau and Jill Manthorpe

This paper presents the results of a thematic analysis of safeguarding adults reviews (SARs) where homelessness was a factor to illuminate and improve safeguarding…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the results of a thematic analysis of safeguarding adults reviews (SARs) where homelessness was a factor to illuminate and improve safeguarding practice and the support of adults who are homeless in England.

Design/methodology/approach

SARs were identified from a variety of sources and a thematic analysis was undertaken using data extraction tables.

Findings

In addition to identifying shortcomings in inter-agency co-operation, SARs highlighted a failure to recognize care needs and self-neglect among people with experience of homelessness and evidenced difficulties in engagement between professionals and people with experience of homelessness.

Research limitations/implications

The authors may have failed to find some SARs in this category (there is no central registry). SARs vary in quality and in detail; some were not full reports. The approach to people’s experience of homelessness was broad and covered more than the circumstances of people who were rough sleeping or living on the streets.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the current practice debates and policy initiatives in respect of homelessness and safeguarding in England. It may have wider relevance in the rest of the UK and internationally.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Book part

Bruno Lanz, Allan Provins, Ian J. Bateman, Riccardo Scarpa, Ken Willis and Ece Ozdemiroglu

We investigate discrepancies between willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA) in the context of a stated choice experiment. Using data on customer…

Abstract

We investigate discrepancies between willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA) in the context of a stated choice experiment. Using data on customer preferences for water services where respondents were able to both ‘sell’ and ‘buy’ the choice experiment attributes, we find evidence of non-linearity in the underlying utility function even though the range of attribute levels is relatively small. Our results reveal the presence of significant loss aversion in all the attributes, including price. We find the WTP–WTA schedule to be asymmetric around the current provision level and that the WTP–WTA ratio varies according to the particular provision change under consideration. Such reference point findings are of direct importance for practitioners and decision-makers using choice experiments for economic appraisal such as cost–benefit analysis, where failure to account for non-linearity in welfare estimates may significantly over- or under-state individual's preferences for gains and avoiding losses respectively.

Details

Choice Modelling: The State-of-the-art and The State-of-practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-773-8

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Article

Peter Fuggle, Dickon Bevington, Fiona Duffy and Liz Cracknell

MBIT is a manualised mentalization-based approach to working with hard to reach young people at risk of a wide range of life adversities including severe mental illness…

Abstract

Purpose

MBIT is a manualised mentalization-based approach to working with hard to reach young people at risk of a wide range of life adversities including severe mental illness, substance misuse, family breakdown, school exclusion, offending and homelessness. The on-line manual (www.tiddlymanuals.com) describes how Adolescent Mentalization-Based Integrative Therapy (AMBIT) is a systemic intervention requiring attention to four different domains of intervention simultaneously; much emphasis is placed on the support systems for workers to maintain this balance in what are often chaotic working conditions. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how these four main components of the AMBIT approach link together in actual clinical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors illustrate the core techniques of the AMBIT approach, namely, “working with your client”, “working with your team”, “ working with your network” and “learning as a team” with a series of case vignettes, demonstrating the inter-relationship of these components rather than seeing them as separate strands.

Findings

A range of mentalization-based techniques such as “thinking together”, mentalized formulation, “disintegration grids” and web-based manualising are described and illustrated in relation to a series of case vignettes in order to address barriers to effective practice. The vignettes emphasise how these components must be linked together and held in balance, and how easily they become disconnected in working with young people’s ambivalent or even hostile relationships to help.

Practical implications

First, developing a shared, mentalized formulation of a young person’s difficulties is an important aspect of working with highly troubled young people. Second, mentalizing is a relational process and is easily disrupted, for both workers and young people, by raised anxiety and affect, a common feature of working with this client group. AMBIT provides specific methods, for example, “thinking together” for supporting the mentalizing of individual workers in their team in an explicit way. Third, workers from different agencies may often find it difficult to make sense of each other’s behaviour and decision making. AMBIT proposes the use of a mentalizing approach to this difficulty using a technique called a disintegration grid. Finally, AMBIT proposes a new practitioner focused approach to manualising as a method by which a team can become more explicit about its methods of working in order to support systematic practice and evaluate outcomes.

Originality/value

The innovative AMBIT approach proposes that clinicians need to attend to team and network relationships at least as much as their relationship with the client, in addition to adopting a stance of learning as a team from their casework. A high level of clinical skill is needed to support a team to achieve this balanced approach to casework. This work is of interest to all multi-disciplinary teams working with hard to reach young people.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article

Fiona Edgar, Alan Geare and Jing A. Zhang

The connection between employees’ well-being and performance, although widely studied in organizational psychology, has received much less attention from HRM scholars. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The connection between employees’ well-being and performance, although widely studied in organizational psychology, has received much less attention from HRM scholars. The purpose of this paper is to extend the literature by examining the impacts of the multidimensional structure of well-being consisting of psychological, social and health dimensions on employees’ task and contextual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 281 employees from the New Zealand service sector using a questionnaire survey. Factor analysis was used to determine items that form various facets of well-being and performance constructs. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test the well-being – performance relationship.

Findings

The findings show that different facets of well-being differentially contribute to employees’ task and contextual performance. Specifically, the facets of happiness and trust were positively associated with both task and contextual performance, while the effects of life satisfaction and work life balance on task and contextual performance were insignificant. Moreover, work intensification was only associated with task performance, in contrast, job satisfaction and over commitment were only related to contextual performance.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings are two-fold. For researchers, a review and overhaul of the conceptualization and operationalization of well-being in HRM studies is long overdue. For managers, improvements to employees’ job performance and the organization’s health can result from simultaneously enhancing multiple dimensions of employees’ well-being.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the complex relationship between well-being and performance by incorporating a multidimensional and multifaceted perspective of well-being and highlighting the distinctive effects of various facets of well-being on different types of employees’ performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article

Fiona Donald, Cameron Duff, Jillian Broadbear, Sathya Rao and Katherine Lawrence

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex condition characterized by a number of psychosocial difficulties that typically involve considerable suffering for…

Abstract

Purpose

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex condition characterized by a number of psychosocial difficulties that typically involve considerable suffering for individuals with the condition. Recovery from BPD may involve specific processes such as work on how the self is perceived by the individual with BPD and his or her relationships which differ from those common to recovery from other mental health conditions. The details of the processes that may best promote changes within the self and relationships are yet to be established. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 17 consumers from a specialist BPD service were interviewed to identify factors they have experienced that contribute to recovery from BPD. Thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework was used to understand key themes within the interview data. The emphasis was on specific conditions of change rather than the more global goals for recovery suggested by recent models.

Findings

Key themes identified included five conditions of change: support from others; accepting the need for change; working on trauma without blaming oneself; curiosity about oneself; and reflecting on one’s behavior. To apply these conditions of change more broadly, clinicians working in the BPD field need to support processes that promote BPD-specific recovery identified by consumers rather than focusing exclusively on the more general recovery principles previously identified within the literature.

Originality/value

The specific factors identified by consumers as supporting recovery in BPD are significant because they involve specific skills or attitudes rather than aspirations or goals. These specific skills may be constructively supported in clinical practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article

Fiona Rowe, Donald Stewart and Carla Patterson

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to demonstrate the contribution of whole school approaches embodied by the health‐promoting school approach, to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to demonstrate the contribution of whole school approaches embodied by the health‐promoting school approach, to the promotion of school connectedness, defined as the cohesiveness between diverse groups in the school community, including students, families, school staff and the wider community.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐disciplinary review of literature was conducted to identify strategies consistent with the health‐promoting school approach and the values and principles that promote school connectedness. The review included peer‐reviewed articles and published books and reports identified from the databases spanning the education, health, social science and science disciplines and used search terms encompassing health and mental health promotion, schools, social connectedness, belonging and attachment. The paper is also a framework of the contribution of the health‐promoting school approach to promoting school connectedness and was developed drawing on health promotion strategies at the broader community level known to foster connectedness.

Findings

The paper found that the framework developed illustrates how the health‐promoting school approach has the potential to build school connectedness through two major mechanisms: inclusive processes that involve the diversity of members that make up a community; the active participation of community members and equal “power” relationships, or equal partnerships among community members; and supportive structures such as school policies, the way the school is organised and its physical environment, that reflect the values of participation, democracy and inclusiveness and/or that promote processes based on these values.

Practical implications

In this paper the detailed mechanisms outlined in the framework provide practical strategies for health promotion practitioners and educators to use in the everyday school setting to promote school connectedness.

Originality/value

This paper draws together substantial bodies of evidence and makes a persuasive case for the contribution of the health‐promoting school approach to building school connectedness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Fiona McFadzean and Elspeth McFadzean

To examine the literature on employee morale and to construct a model of this area pertaining to nurses. This framework seeks to present morale in a holistic manner…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the literature on employee morale and to construct a model of this area pertaining to nurses. This framework seeks to present morale in a holistic manner, illustrating the causal factors that influence nursing morale, the changes that occur in morale when these input variables are altered, and the consequences to patient care and individual and group nursing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of published works on morale, its causal factors and resulting consequences are critiqued. The findings from this literature review are used to develop a framework for nursing morale.

Findings

The paper presents a definition of morale and, from the literature review, concludes that previous models on morale are fragmented; only tending to explore the variables that influence the employees' emotional state. Consequently, a framework of nursing morale is constructed in order to illustrate this topic from a holistic point‐of‐view.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a number of management and research implications. The management implications consist of a number of useful suggestions for senior nurses to enhance the morale within their units.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified gap in the literature, namely the lack of a holistic model of nursing morale, and offers practical help to senior nurses so that they can initiate processes within their wards that can improve their subordinates' morale.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Jan Lees, Fiona Lomas and Rex Haigh

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the expert by experience, and its benefits and challenges.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the expert by experience, and its benefits and challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of the relevant literature and a case study has been performed.

Findings

The role of the expert by experience is fluid and complex. Staff need to understand the ambiguities of the role.

Practical implications

Experts by experience (XBXs) play an important role in TC practice. They need support and supervision. Staff need to learn about the complexities and fluidity of the role, and to be aware of its transitional position between service user and staff member.

Social implications

XBXs challenge the binary notion of staff and service user. The role calls for a different relational rather than procedural conceptualisation.

Originality/value

This is the first description of the lived experience of an expert by experience, working in a therapeutic community setting, with the analysis of the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the role.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article

Fernando Martín Alcázar, Pedro Miguel Romero Fernández and Gonzalo Sánchez Gardey

Workforce diversity is considered one of the main challenges for human resource management in modern organizations. Despite its strategic importance, the majority of…

Abstract

Purpose

Workforce diversity is considered one of the main challenges for human resource management in modern organizations. Despite its strategic importance, the majority of models in this field implicitly consider workforce as a generic and homogeneous category, and do not take into account cultural differences among employees. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic review of the literature on diversity among employees in strategic human resource management (SHRM). The objective of this conceptual analysis is to identify limitations in previous research and unresolved issues that could drive future research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop this conceptual analysis, the paper reviews previous literature on SHRM, drawing on the distinction between the universalistic, contingent and configurational perspectives. Each of these approaches is explored, looking for the way in which they have treated workforce diversity and cross‐culturality.

Findings

The paper concludes that managing a heterogeneous workforce requires a holistic transformation of human resource strategies. Nevertheless, efforts to define cross‐cultural and diversity‐oriented models still remain undeveloped. Limitations of previous research in the diversity‐SHRM field are indentified in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

Drawing on the limitations of the treatment given to diversity in SHRM research, the paper identifies four research questions that still need to be addressed: deeper analysis of the concept of diversity, introduction of psychological processes mediating the diversity‐performance relationship, development of diversity oriented SHRM typologies and redefinition of performance indicators to measure the effects of diversity.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a theoretical model to illustrate present state of the art and future research lines in the fields of diversity, cross‐cultural management and SHRM.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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