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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Yudi Fernando, Ika Sari Wahyuni-T.D., Anderes Gui, Ridho Bramulya Ikhsan, Fineke Mergeresa and Yuvaraj Ganesan

This paper aims to investigate the adoption barriers of Industry 4.0 in the Indonesian manufacturing supply chains.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the adoption barriers of Industry 4.0 in the Indonesian manufacturing supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed method was deployed to validate the findings. First, the qualitative study was conducted based on the interviews. Then, the companies were approached using filter questions on the involvement in adopting industry 4.0 and its impact on the supply chain.

Findings

Based on the qualitative study, nine main barriers were found in the thematic analysis. Thus, to get a consensus on the barriers in the industry, the barrier indicators were tested using a structural equation model retrieved from 173 small and medium Indonesian manufacturing firms. Results indicate that five main barriers (e.g. unclear Industry 4.0 policy, higher-risk investment, insecure data sharing, lack of expertise and lack of incentive) are confirmed as the adoption barriers.

Practical implications

The successful adoption of supply chain integration with Industry 4.0 technology can strengthen the manufacturing sector and competitiveness. Therefore, this study can be a complimentary assessment to evaluate the Indonesia Industry 4.0 Readiness Index (INDI 4.0) and the effectiveness of the government support program.

Originality/value

The results can be used as the framework to foresee the successful implementation of smart manufacturing supply chain management and its integration. Therefore, the authors proposed the framework to foresee the successful implementation of smart manufacturing, supply chain management and integration.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2024

Yudi Fernando, Fineke Mergeresa, Ika Sari Wahyuni-TD and Nurul Sabrina Hazarasim

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first objective is to examine the impact of the halal beauty supply chain (HBSC) on sustainable operational excellence (SOE). The second…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first objective is to examine the impact of the halal beauty supply chain (HBSC) on sustainable operational excellence (SOE). The second objective is to investigate Post-SARS-CoV-2 mitigation strategies executed by halal beauty companies in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire was distributed via an online survey, and data were analyzed from 143 beauty firms and their supply chains. This study used a structural equation modeling technique to test the validity of the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

This study found that halal transportation, halal manufacturing, halal packaging and post-SARS-CoV-2 mitigation strategies had a significant and direct effect on SOE. The halal procurement was the only predictor that affected the SOE when the post-SARS-CoV-2 mitigation strategy was computed as a moderator in the research model.

Practical implications

Consumers have the right to determine what is a good product by researching it before purchase and consumption. Muslim customers must pay attention and seek information on how the product is manufactured and distributed using sustainable materials according to Shariah law. This is because consumers are responsible for both themselves and others. Companies must view consumer awareness of product qualities as a business opportunity. Halal beauty companies should frequently execute risk mapping and mitigation strategies to decrease risk, improve revenues and attain sustainable business objectives.

Originality/value

Although the HBSC encompasses numerous complicated areas, such as strategic marketing, operations, as well as behavioral and Shariah compliance, there is a deficiency of literature on how firms mitigate risk in the halal supply chain. This study proposes a framework for a HBSC that achieves and leverages SOE.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2022

Yudi Fernando, Ika Sari Wahyuni-TD, Ahmed Zainul Abideen and Fineke Mergeresa

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of Halal traceability technology usage on Halal logistics performance with a Halal logistics brand as a mediator.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of Halal traceability technology usage on Halal logistics performance with a Halal logistics brand as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to gather responses from logistics service providers (LSPs), including strategic logistics units (manufacturing/brand owners) in Malaysia, which offer Halal logistics services.

Findings

Halal traceability technology system and Halal traceability training are two critical domains to strengthen market recognition of Halal logistics brand for LSPs. The study found that the Halal logistics brand played a mediating role in connecting the usage of Halal traceability technology and logistics performance.

Practical implications

The logistics industry needs to focus on Halal logistics services as a unique proposition. The ability of LSPs to build a Halal logistics brand thru traceability technology had created positive impressions for clients. LSPs must consistently engage in Halal training and remain technologically alert to build Halal brand value. Halal-based strategic branding will assist an LSP to stand out among its competitors.

Originality/value

Even though Halal branding has been studied widely, little attention has been given to how the usage of Halal traceability technology can improve Halal logistics branding and logistics operational performance. The result suggests that LSPs need to build a Halal logistics brand and design a proper logistics business strategy to target Sharia compliance-oriented consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Yudi Fernando, Muhamad Fairuz Ahmad Jasmi, Ika Sari Wahyuni-TD, Fineke Mergeresa, Kamarul Azman Khamis, A. Fakhrorazi and Rusdi Omar

Halal frozen meat product returns are major challenges in the halal frozen meat supply chain because of the sheer volume and processing costs of returns. The purpose of this paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

Halal frozen meat product returns are major challenges in the halal frozen meat supply chain because of the sheer volume and processing costs of returns. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of integrated halal supply chain (IHSC) strategies on effective product returns with halal logistics (HL) as an interceding variable.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used the cross-sectional technique to select samples from a population that revolved around the halal food industry in Malaysia. Data collected from halal service providers who handle halal frozen meat product returns provided insightful findings.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate that the IHSC dimensions, such as interactive fairness, procedural fairness and service coverage, are positively associated with effective product returns. It also shows that HL plays a mediating role between the IHSC and effective product returns.

Practical implications

From a practical viewpoint, this paper suggests that an effective return service system can be designed to emphasise the category of interactive and flexible justice services through refunds or product replacement, depending on customer's demand.

Originality/value

The result of this paper provides insights into how logistics service provider managers effectively and efficiently handle the halal supply chain network when involving product returns.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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