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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Mohammad G. Nejad

The financial industry offers a unique setting to study innovations. Financial innovations have fueled the growth of economies, markets and societies. The financial

Abstract

Purpose

The financial industry offers a unique setting to study innovations. Financial innovations have fueled the growth of economies, markets and societies. The financial industry has successfully become the breeding ground for innovative services, processes, business models and technologies. This study seeks to provide a holistic view of the literature on financial innovations, synthesize the research findings and offer future directions for research in light of three market developments that are disrupting the industry and opening up a new era for the financial services industry. Disruptions from within and outside the industry offer new generations of radically innovative services. Moreover, new generations of consumers differ from previous generations in their needs and wants and look for innovative ways to handle their financial needs. Finally, significant developments related to financial innovations have emerged in Asia and developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study systematically reviews the academic research literature on financial innovations in two phases. The first phase provides a quantitative review of 546 journal articles published between 1990 and 2018. In the second phase, the study synthesizes the extant research on financial innovations and maps them in five research areas: firms' introduction and adoption of FIs, financial innovation development, the outcomes of financial innovations, regulations and intellectual property, and consumers.

Findings

The analysis found that disciplines differ with regard to the employed research methodologies, the units of analysis, sources of data and the innovations they examined. A positive trend in the number of published articles during this period is observed. However, studies have primarily focused on the USA and Europe and less so on other parts of the world. The literature synthesis further identifies research gaps in the available research that highlight future research opportunities in light of the three market disruptions. The financial services industry is on the brink of a new era due to disruptions from within and outside the industry and the entrance of new generations of consumers. Moreover, the financial industry has successfully become the breeding ground for innovative services, processes and business models. Therefore, financial innovations offer promising opportunities for bridging the gap between research on product and service innovations.

Research limitations/implications

The work provides a holistic and systematic overview of extant research on financial innovations and highlights future research opportunities in light of the three disruptive market developments. It helps researchers take advantage of the opportunities in studying financial innovations while maintaining industry relevance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to review and synthesize the academic research literature on financial innovations across marketing, finance and innovation disciplines. In addition, the study highlights three primary disruptive forces in the financial industry and identifies future research directions in light of these disruptive forces.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Pamela A. Kennett, George P. Moschis and Danny N. Bellenger

The aging population in the United States makes skill in marketingto the mature consumer increasingly important. The biophysical andpsychosocial aging process creates a…

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Abstract

The aging population in the United States makes skill in marketing to the mature consumer increasingly important. The biophysical and psychosocial aging process creates a need for specific strategies to address the changes brought on by age. Attempts to ascertain the degree to which the financial services industry recognizes some of the needs of the elderly market and the degree to which marketing programs are addressing these needs. The results show that financial services marketers have been slow in implementing strategies which might help them better attract and serve the mature consumer, when compared with other industries. While this industry has done an excellent job in developing products which appeal to older consumers, they appear to be lacking in special assistance to mature consumers and training to support such assistance. Provides managerial implications stressing specific areas for improvement.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

O. Sallyanne Decker

This paper argues that when corporate social responsibility (CSR) is conceptualised pragmatically as a response by businesses to society's concerns it acts as an element…

9768

Abstract

This paper argues that when corporate social responsibility (CSR) is conceptualised pragmatically as a response by businesses to society's concerns it acts as an element of structural change with implications for the strategies of firms and ultimately for industry structure. Furthermore, industry specific aspects of CSR are important and governmental influences and financial regulation provide an added dimension to the impact of CSR on the financial services industry. As an element of structural change, CSR acts as an environmental discontinuity and forces firms to realign their positions within their operating environment. A structural change paradigm is developed to examine trends which are emerging within retail banking as a result of CSR. In the UK retail banking sector, the impact of CSR is increasingly manifest in the efforts to create a competitive advantage out of CSR strategies, the growing prominence of mutual financial institutions in government policy and collaborative efforts between a range of financial institutions.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Kenneth Andrew

This monograph covers a number of key articlesand presentations by the author over the lastdecade. The points contained in them reflect aclear belief based on experience…

Abstract

This monograph covers a number of key articles and presentations by the author over the last decade. The points contained in them reflect a clear belief based on experience of creating significant cultural change so that banks become more market‐driven and customer‐orientated. Many of the forecasts made in the articles have become a reality in the marketplace. This monograph begins with a description of changes over the last decade: the introduction of the marketing function into banks, consumer responses, new competitors, technological developments, and the impact of Government. Marketing has faced many difficulties in the banking industry and competitive breakthroughs have not been easy to achieve. Many leaders in the industry believe in business/marketing strategy evolving in close association with IT planning – this is the second topic, IT support may be crucial. The importance of advertising and management of agency relationships is the subject of Chapter 3 – how can it be effectively used? Chapter 4 looks at the ways in which the consumer is presently getting a better deal; Chapter 5 describes the marketing success of the NatWest Piggy Bank within the context of a changing marketing culture. A wider repertoire of marketing techniques are used in the USA (Chapter 6) but if they are to be used in the same way here then the situation will need to approximate more closely to that of the USA – credit and credit cards are the particular focus and the US market is more aggressive. Chapters 7‐9 look at the future of financial services marketing from the retailer′s perspective – the retailer′s detailed approach to a possible new business has distinctive strengths, but their actual opportunities in this market may be restricted to an extent by, for example, inexperience and so lower credibility as vendors of some specialised services like investment management. Chapter 10 appraises the value and strategic nature of market research. Chapter 11 considers the movement of building societies into the wider personal financial services marketplace, the product′s role in the marketing mix, and the impact of the Single Market in Europe. Chapter 12 singles out the cost‐effective technique of automated vetting of customers′ creditworthiness from the special viewpoint of the building society. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the changing market and future prospects: the world of finance is no longer simple; money is no longer the common denominator; the consumer is now the focus; competition to provide services is fierce; the future is exciting!

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Manuchehr Shahrokhi

This purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the status of e‐finance and discuss related issues and challenges. Provides data about growth of e‐finance in the…

14671

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the status of e‐finance and discuss related issues and challenges. Provides data about growth of e‐finance in the last decade. Introduces advances and innovations in e‐finance and challenges facing the financial services and IT industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the archival method of reviewing related literature (theoretical, applied and empirical) and organizing and presenting the topics to provide an overview of e‐finance status.

Findings

The major contributions and finding of this paper include all areas of e‐finance, application of technology to e‐finance, growth of the e‐finance in the financial services industry.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides areas of e‐finance that face many different challenges and calls for further research in a number of areas related to e‐finance technology and the interface of financial services and IT.

Practical implications

The paper brings all scattered information and data about e‐finance under one umbrella that would make scholars and practitioners aware of advances in e‐finance and applications of innovations and new technology to financial services provided.

Originality/value

The main value or contribution of this paper is bringing together most of available literature, advances, innovations, application of IT in the financial services industry and showing how organizations could benefit from such innovations. It also provides ideas to scholars for further research in this area.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Surianom Miskam, Abdul Monir Yaacob and Romzie Rosman

The global Islamic financial landscape is changing with rapid advances in technology. The increasingly tech-savvy demography is presenting both opportunities and…

Abstract

The global Islamic financial landscape is changing with rapid advances in technology. The increasingly tech-savvy demography is presenting both opportunities and challenges to the industry. With the advances in e-finance and mobile technologies, financial technology (Fintech) innovations emerged by combining the e-finance, Internet, social networking services, social media, artificial intelligence (AI) and big data analytics. Fintech promises to reshape the Islamic financial landscape by improving processes’ efficiencies, cost-effectiveness, increased distribution, Sharīʿah compliance and financial inclusion. As far as the Islamic fund management industry is concerned, AI seems to be the keyword. Islamic fund managers have recently started to incorporate AI and big data analytics into their strategy in the process of making accurate decisions based on facts and figures, which eliminates any biases and personal intuition. This disruption in status quo is raising new issues, new concerns and new exciting opportunities. While disruption may carry negative connotations, the industry players have been embracing the innovation and potential revolution the technology could offer. Thus, the objective of this chapter is to discuss legal aspects of Fintech and its impact on the Islamic fund management industry in Malaysia. This chapter introduces a historical overview of Fintech and its evolution in the Islamic fund management industry. This chapter further provides an overview of the legal and regulatory aspects of Fintech with regards to the industry. Finally, legal issues and challenges are identified and discussed. Being a legal research, this chapter adopts a qualitative method by analysing the relevant literatures on the subject. This chapter is expected to provide an insight into the application of Fintech and its impact on the Islamic fund management industry in Malaysia.

Details

Emerging Issues in Islamic Finance Law and Practice in Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-546-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Namrata Sandhu

This study aims to enlist the red flag behaviors exhibited in financial services frauds.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enlist the red flag behaviors exhibited in financial services frauds.

Design/methodology/approach

A pluralistic mixed methodology was adopted in this study. Data collected via semi-structured interviews were coded, quantified and subjected to descriptive analysis to identify the most frequently exhibited red flag behaviors in financial services frauds. The relative risk of exhibition of the identified red flag behaviors was assessed by intuitively comparing the red flag behaviors identified in financial services frauds (experimental group, n = 24) with the red flag behaviors identified in a heterogeneous control sample of non-financial services frauds (control group, n = 28).

Findings

This study identifies six red flag behaviors likely to be more frequently exhibited in financial services frauds than in non-financial services frauds.

Practical implications

Results of this study can be used to develop a typical behavioral profile of a financial services fraud perpetrator. Active communication of this profile in fraud awareness training can help make fraud conspicuous in the financial services industry.

Originality/value

This study is unique because human behavior as a possible fraud indicator is an under-researched area. Further, this study examines first level of evidence and attempts an ex-post analysis of actual red flag behaviors exhibited in acknowledged fraud cases in which the perpetrator/perpetrators has/have been clearly identified.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Heather S. Knewtson and Zachary A. Rosenbaum

The purpose of this study is to define FinTech, differentiating it from financial technology and use the definition to develop an industry framework.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to define FinTech, differentiating it from financial technology and use the definition to develop an industry framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the existing literature on FinTech and incorporating these contributions into a traditional financial structure, characteristics are outlined and placed into a framework that describes the FinTech industry.

Findings

FinTech is a specific type of Financial Technology, defined as technology used to provide financial markets a financial product or financial service, characterized by sophisticated technology relative to existing technology in that market. Firms that primarily use FinTech are classified as FinTech firms. Using these definitions, the paper provides a structure for the FinTech industry, classifying each type of FinTech firm by FinTech characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Research that would inform the economic importance of FinTech would be served with an increased understanding of FinTech firms and the FinTech industry.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by defining FinTech and developing a comprehensive framework to describe the emerging FinTech industry.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Richard Brophy

The purpose of this paper is to chart the development of financial services education from its origins in the insurance industry to the current offering for people who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to chart the development of financial services education from its origins in the insurance industry to the current offering for people who wish to work in the life and non-life insurance industry. Financial services education within Ireland has evolved over time. Originally perceived to be an outpost of the British Insurance Institute, it is the responsibility of a variety of institutes that operate in the financial sectors, covering a range which includes insurance, banking and credit unions. Where tertiary education was optional, it is now a requirement of the regulator that people working in this sector have achieved at least this standard. Additionally, specialist qualifications for those working in the industry are being developed with academic involvement, as the institutes work to provide professional qualifications.

Design/methodology/approach

To compare and contrast the Irish regulatory requirements, an analysis of other European Union (EU) national requirements was conducted, illustrating differences in education and current certification requirements.

Findings

Educational requirements in Ireland go a long way in terms of ensuring that workers in financial services are adequately skilled in terms of academic, professional, ethical and continuous professional development (CPD). The Irish system covers a lot of aspects of financial services minimum competency code that is implemented in other EU jurisdictions, and in some cases, it has a unique approach in CPD.

Practical implications

Serves as a comparable study of minimum competency requirements of EU for financial services employees and highlights differences in requirements across borders.

Originality/value

This is a unique study of minimum competency code that has been implemented by financial regulators across EU member states and its impact in the industry in terms of raising the requirements of people involved in the sector.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 115000