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Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2017

Qiongwei Ye and Baojun Ma

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insight and analysis into E-commerce in China and how it has revolutionized and

Abstract

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insight and analysis into E-commerce in China and how it has revolutionized and continues to revolutionize business and society. Split into four distinct sections, the book first lays out the theoretical foundations and fundamental concepts of E-Business before moving on to look at internet+ innovation models and their applications in different industries such as agriculture, finance and commerce. The book then provides a comprehensive analysis of E-business platforms and their applications in China before finishing with four comprehensive case studies of major E-business projects, providing readers with successful examples of implementing E-Business entrepreneurship projects.

Internet + and Electronic Business in China is a comprehensive resource that provides insights and analysis into how E-commerce has revolutionized and continues to revolutionize business and society in China.

Details

Internet+ and Electronic Business in China: Innovation and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-115-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Rexford Abaidoo

This study examines dynamics of global and regional financial market efficiency; and how specific features of the market and other conditions influence variability in such…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines dynamics of global and regional financial market efficiency; and how specific features of the market and other conditions influence variability in such efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs fixed effects statistical approach in its examination of how specific features of financial markets influence variability in its efficiency.

Findings

This study finds that individual IMF defined economic regions tend to exhibits significantly different financial market efficiency characteristics given specific market features and conditions. In regional level comparative analysis (e.g. Europe, Africa, Asia–Pacific etc.) this study finds that incidence of financial market uncertainty is the dominant condition with significant effect on financial market efficiency across all the IMF regions. In the global level analysis, empirical estimates presented suggest that financial market uncertainty, financial institutional depth and financial institutional efficiency tend to have significant positive influence on global financial market efficiency all things being equal. In the same analysis however, this study finds that financial market and financial institutional access growth has significant negative impact on financial market efficiency.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study compared to related ones found in the literature stems from its focus on financial market efficiency at the global, and IMF defined regional block level instead of on a specific economy as often found in the literature. Additionally, in contrast to other related studies, this study further examines the role of global financial market uncertainty in its financial market efficiency analysis. Financial market uncertainty variable may be unique to this study because the variable is derived through an econometric process from a base variable.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 36 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

DeokJong Jeong and Sunyoung Park

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze the effect of the increasing connectedness among financial institutions in the Korean financial market, as it affects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze the effect of the increasing connectedness among financial institutions in the Korean financial market, as it affects the market microstructure in the stock market. Thus this work, first, analyzes the trend and characteristics of connectedness in the Korean financial sector. This work then demonstrates the impacts of connectedness on volatility and price discovery in the stock market.

Design/methodology/approach

The entire Korean financial sector is analyzed from January 1990 to July 2015, including the periods of the 1997 Asian crisis and the 2007/2008 global financial crisis. This paper quantifies the connectedness between financial institutions using network methodology. Densely connectedness specifically refers to the cases in which a node experiences strong-lagged return spillover from and/or to itself.

Findings

Connectedness is established as an important determinant of stock price discovery. This paper illustrates that connectedness increases on significant economic events such as the 1997 Asian crisis and the 2007/2008 global financial crisis. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates that the more densely connected a particular financial institution, the more volatile the stock price and the less accurate the stock price quality.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding the financial system from a network perspective has been on the rise after the 2007/2008 global financial crisis. This work helps regulators and policy makers understand the full implications of introducing new policies that can more closely connect financial institutions.

Originality/value

This paper precisely captures financial institutions’ connectedness by including all types of financial institutions at the micro level. Additionally, this paper links connectedness to market microstructure in the stock market.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

Richard J. Briston and Richard Dobbins

Institutional investors—insurance companies, pension funds, investment trust companies and unit trusts—have increased significantly and persistently their ownership of…

Abstract

Institutional investors—insurance companies, pension funds, investment trust companies and unit trusts—have increased significantly and persistently their ownership of British industry. At the end of 1977 they owned approximately 46 per cent of the ordinary shares in UK quoted companies and in recent years have accounted for over 50 per cent of stock market turnover in UK equities. Their presence in the stock market has been associated with their ability to influence share prices, decide the outcome of takeover battles, and trade outside the London Stock Exchange. As major shareholders in public companies they have been encouraged to participate in managerial decision‐making. For corporate management, the growth of institutional shareholdings provides opportunities to utilise their voting power in takeover situations, encourage their support for the market value of the company, and use financial institutions as sources of new capital.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Gregory J McKee and Albert Kagan

The purpose of this paper is to assess product and service arrays of community banks within competitive markets that are impacted by varying sized financial institutions

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess product and service arrays of community banks within competitive markets that are impacted by varying sized financial institutions. A cost efficiency model is used to understand the relationship of product offerings and business cycle response upon bank performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A cost efficiency model is used to understand the relationship of product offerings and business cycle response upon bank performance. Markets comprised of alternate size and type of financial institutions are compared.

Findings

Greater values of X_EFF i when institutions compete are observed in this analysis. Cost efficiency is lowest when community banks are the only institution in the market, and second lowest when credit unions are the only competing institutions. Call report data are analyzed from 1994 to 2013. The number of big banks increases community bank efficiency and efficiency of large banks. Also, the number of community banks does affect big bank cost efficiency. The magnitude of the effect pertaining to the number of community banks upon big bank efficiency is much smaller than that of the number of big banks on community bank efficiency.

Originality/value

This study considers cost efficiency and profitability as measures of institution on the performance of a competing institutional type. The modeling approach uses cost efficiency as a method of observing the performance of financial institutions and an explanation of how firms persist, grow, and respond to changes in technology or regulation. The effects of the presence of each type of financial institution on the performance of another type are compared. Situations in which any number of one or more institutional types is present in a market are considered for analysis purposes.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Robert A. Eisenbeis and Richard J. Herring

The purpose of this paper is to examine the events leading up to the Great Recession, the US Federal Reserve’s response to what it perceived to be a short-term liquidity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the events leading up to the Great Recession, the US Federal Reserve’s response to what it perceived to be a short-term liquidity problem, and the programs it put in place to address liquidity needs from 2007 through the third quarter of 2008.

Design/methodology/approach

These programs were designed to channel liquidity to some of the largest institutions, most of which were primary dealers. We describe these programs, examine available evidence regarding their effectiveness and detail which institutions received the largest amounts under each program.

Findings

We argue that increasing financial fragility and potential insolvencies in several major institutions were evident prior to the crisis. While it is inherently difficult to disentangle issues of illiquidity from issues of insolvency, failure to recognize and address those insolvency problems delayed necessary adjustments, undermined confidence in the financial system and may have exacerbated the crisis.

Research limitations/implications

Disentangling issues of illiquidity from issues of insolvency is inherently difficult and so it is not possible to specify a definitive counterfactual scenario. Nonetheless, failure to recognize and address the insolvency problems in several major institutions until more than a year after the crisis had begun delayed the necessary adjustment and undermined confidence in the financial system.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to analyze data showing the amounts of lending and the distribution of these loans across institutions under the Fed’s special liquidity facilities during the first 18 months of the financial crisis.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Shatha Qamhieh Hashem and Islam Abdeljawad

This chapter investigates the presence of a difference in the systemic risk level between Islamic and conventional banks in Bangladesh. The authors compare systemic…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the presence of a difference in the systemic risk level between Islamic and conventional banks in Bangladesh. The authors compare systemic resilience of three types of banks: fully fledged Islamic banks, purely conventional banks (CB), and CB with Islamic windows. The authors use the market-based systemic risk measures of marginal expected shortfall and systemic risk to identify which type is more vulnerable to a systemic event. The authors also use ΔCoVaR to identify which type contributes more to a systemic event. Using a sample of observations on 27 publicly traded banks operating over the 2005–2014 period, the authors find that CB is the least resilient sector to a systemic event, and is the one that has the highest contribution to systemic risk during crisis times.

Details

Management of Islamic Finance: Principle, Practice, and Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-403-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Abstract

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Central Bank Policy: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-751-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Walid Abdmoulah

This study aims to shed new light on the nexus between market competition and financial development (FD), using the new FD index developed by the IMF, covering financial

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to shed new light on the nexus between market competition and financial development (FD), using the new FD index developed by the IMF, covering financial institutions and markets access, depth and efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses panel data from 140 countries over 2000–2014 period and a dynamic generalized method of moments (GMM) model, along with a sensitivity analysis over 2008 financial crisis.

Findings

Strong evidence of the positive impact of market competition, as measured by Boone index, on financial institutions and markets development is found, whereas banks concentration has a damaging effect on FD. Commonly used Lerner index is found to be irrelevant. Interestingly, none of the competition indexes in this study affects financial institutions returns, which hold even over 2008 financial crisis, likely at the expense of depth and access in developing countries. Institutions, as proxied by control of corruption, have broader positive impact on FD, particularly on financial markets. These findings have important implications for developing countries keen to foster the development of their financial system.

Practical implications

Policymakers should take into consideration that FI are unlikely to undertake deep improvements in terms of credit allocation depth and inclusion on a volunteer basis, unless constrained by regulations. When promoting bank competition, it is recommended to diversify methods targeting market competition, notably by promoting financial business diversification and intermediary efficiency, and tackling collusion arrangements or interest groups influence. Second, it is important to support households and small and medium enterprises’ access to finance. Third, it is highly recommended to promote good institutions given their overall beneficial role in promoting the financial system as a whole, notably financial markets.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this study is the first to fully use the new IMF Financial Development index. It covers financial institutions and markets access, depth and efficiency, whereas most of previous findings focus on access to credit or cost of credit. Besides, the study uses a larger panel data from 140 countries over 2000–2014 period and a dynamic GMM estimator, along with a sensitivity analysis over (2007–2009) crisis. By exploring the impact of three different competition indicators, namely, Boone, Lerner and banks concentration indexes, the study responds to the concerns regarding the limitations of each of them.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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