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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Macarena Sacristán-Díaz, Pedro Garrido-Vega and José Moyano-Fuentes

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationships between the different dimensions of supply chain integration (SCI). First, the sequence in which these dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationships between the different dimensions of supply chain integration (SCI). First, the sequence in which these dimensions should be implemented and some possible mediating effects are investigated. Then, relationships are examined more closely to observe whether they present more complex non-linear forms than those usually analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

Required information was gathered from a sample of 477 Spanish industrial companies (23.4 per cent response rate). PLS structural equation modelling was applied to capture non-linear relationships between SCI dimensions.

Findings

The results indicate that internal integration leads to external integration and that within external integration, information flow integration provides the basis for financial flow integration and physical flow integration. Thus, the results suggest the existence of a logical sequence to achieve SCI. In addition, clearly different non-linear relationships are observed between the analysed variables.

Practical implications

It seems that a sufficient minimum value has to be reached for internal integration to have a positive effect on external information and financial integration. In addition, a higher degree of information integration appears to facilitate financial and physical integration, although a medium degree of information integration results in a lower degree of financial integration. Therefore, managers should not expect that efforts made to increase one integration dimension will always produce the same effect on the other dimensions.

Originality/value

An empirical contribution is made to knowledge of the logical SCI sequence. This contribution is not only important for academia, but also for managers seeking to improve supply chain performance through integration.

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Rhian Silvestro and Paola Lustrato

The financial supply chain, running parallel to the flow of goods and information, is common to all economic supply networks, and its integration with the physical supply…

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5771

Abstract

Purpose

The financial supply chain, running parallel to the flow of goods and information, is common to all economic supply networks, and its integration with the physical supply chain is therefore a critical and ubiquitous aspect of supply chain integration (SCI) largely ignored in the literature. This paper aims to develop a model of physical and financial SCI, which is based on a process view from both buyers' and suppliers' perspectives, and explores the role of banks in enabling SCI.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports an exploratory study of the role of banks in improving SCI, by presenting a case study analysis of two international banks.

Findings

The findings show that banks can support buyers and suppliers by contributing to the enablers of SCI, namely coordination, collaboration, information sharing and information visibility.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in that it is explorative; further studies are required in order to quantify the impact of banks' interventions on SCI.

Practical implications

Improved SCI requires an understanding of the flow of physical and financial resources across supply networks. Banks can help buyers and suppliers develop a more holistic understanding of the supply chain, thus improving integration and optimising working capital.

Originality/value

The paper presents a process model of physical/financial SCI which uniquely recognises the role of banks in enabling buyers and suppliers to improve SCI, synchronisation and performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Artur Swierczek

The purpose of this paper is to explore the link between interorganizational integration with respect to its intensity and span, as well as the propagation and

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1305

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the link between interorganizational integration with respect to its intensity and span, as well as the propagation and amplification of disruptions alongside a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using a survey of companies. In order to extract the constructs manifesting the span and intensity of integration between companies in supply chains, the principal component analysis was employed. The obtained factor scores were then used as classification criteria in the cluster analysis. It enabled to include similar organizations in terms of intensity and span of supply chain integration. In order to validate the obtained results, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted and regression models were developed.

Findings

The findings of the study show that there is a relationship between the intensity and span of supply chain integration and the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions. The obtained findings show that the span of supply chain integration is negatively associated with the strength of the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions. In addition, the results suggest that more intense supply chain integration contributes to the “snowball effect” in material flows in the forward and backward transmission of disruptions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the current study investigates the intensity and span of integration within the basic, extended and ultimate supply chain structure, it still lacks the broader analysis of the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions. The study investigates this phenomenon only within the basic supply chain structure, constituted by the primary members. Another challenge is to examine if the effects of external risk factors (e.g. natural disasters) may also be transferred to other links in the supply chain structure, and what are the similarities and differences (if any) between the mechanism of propagation and amplification of disruptions elicited by internal and external risk factors. Another future direction of study is to define other ways of identification and measurement of the “snowball effect” in order to make cross-industrial and international comparisons of disruptions amplified in the transmission more standardized and objective. In the current study, the phenomenon of the “snowball effect” is anchored in the subjective opinions of managers who may view the problem from different angles. Consequently, the study is limited to individual perceptions of the strength of disruptions affecting the solicited company, its customers and suppliers.

Practical implications

In practical terms, the findings provide crucial information for the framework of supply chain risk management and therefore enable its more efficient and effective implementation. The better the managers understand the nature of the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions, the easier it is for them to allocate resources and apply necessary managerial tools to mitigate the negative consequences of risk more effectively. The deliverables of the study also confirm that the interorganizational exchange of information accompanying the supply chain integration enables to mitigate the strength of the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions. Another important implication is the broadening of practical expertise concerning the use of integration not only as a means of obtaining and sustaining supply chain effectiveness and efficiency, but also as the way to mitigate the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions. Therefore, nowadays the supply chain managers are facing another challenging task – namely, how to balance supply chain integration in terms of span and intensity to ensure profits from integration and mitigate the negative risk consequences transmitted among the links in supply chains.

Originality/value

The paper elaborates on the underestimated issue of the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions and its drivers. In particular, the paper attempts at filling the gap in empirical studies concerning the relationships between the “snowball effect” in the transmission of disruptions and supply chain integration.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Judith Martin and Erik Hofmann

The purpose of this paper is the analysis of reasons to involve financial service providers (FSPs) in the integrated management of supply chain flows through supply chain…

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4336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the analysis of reasons to involve financial service providers (FSPs) in the integrated management of supply chain flows through supply chain finance (SCF) practices. In addition, service requirements are derived for FSPs in order to respond to company needs related to SCF practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The selected methodology represents a multi-method approach. First, a survey with 62 companies from Switzerland and ten expert interviews were applied to analyze company needs. Second, the study was complemented with a review of gray press, online offers and 11 expert interviews on the service offer of FSPs for managing supply chain flows.

Findings

The results derive company needs for an integrated management of supply chain flows. The company needs are matched with available service offer of FSPs. Based on this match quality gaps are identified and service requirements are derived. The results describe initial measures to close the quality gaps.

Research limitations/implications

This research primarily focuses on financial flows related to the working capital of companies thereby neglecting fixed assets.

Practical implications

The results provide companies with a structured process to analyze the value added of FSPs. FSPs can use the results to better match their service offer with company needs.

Originality/value

This research contributes to research on SCF by developing a structured process for analyzing the company needs for SCF practices as well as the value added of FSPs in offering these practices.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Hua Song, Kangkang Yu and Qiang Lu

Despite their crucial role in sustaining national economies, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are beset by the constraint of financing at better conditions. The purpose…

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3562

Abstract

Purpose

Despite their crucial role in sustaining national economies, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are beset by the constraint of financing at better conditions. The purpose of this paper is to compare supply chain finance (SCF) solutions provided by commercial banks and financial service providers (FSPs) that help SMEs access financing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at multiple case studies using in-depth interviews with focal firms (lenders) to answer the research questions. In-depth interviews were conducted with three Chinese FSPs and three commercial banks providing working capital to the same SMEs. The unit of analysis is SCF solutions that have made the companies competitive in the industry.

Findings

The case studies show that the acquisition of transaction information and business credit in SCF can reduce ex ante information asymmetry. SCF utilizing receivable transfers, closed-loop business, relational embeddedness, and a combination of outcome control and behavioral control can also reduce ex post information asymmetry. For these reasons, compared with commercial bank-dominated SCF, SCF adopted by FSPs in the supply chain can better reduce information asymmetry.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the emerging literature exploring the impact of SCF on SMEs accessing financing. In particular, this study provides supply chain management and operations insights on SCF and their consequent influence. Previous research has focused on the direct dyadic relationship between lenders and borrowers while neglecting supply chain effects. Uniquely, this study explores the different ways commercial banks and FSPs implement SCF solutions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Saurabh Tiwari

The current industrial revolution is powered by data, which is also referred as Industry 4.0. The Industry 4.0 has attracted significant attention from academia and the…

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1226

Abstract

Purpose

The current industrial revolution is powered by data, which is also referred as Industry 4.0. The Industry 4.0 has attracted significant attention from academia and the industry professionals. The supply chain integration (SCI) has played a significant role in enhancing supply chain performance and organizational performance. This study explores the relationship between Industry 4.0 and SCI via an extensive literature review to understand the various levels of integration with the supply chain processes and to identify missing links, through a framework, and suggest further research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we have used systematic literature review approach to identify the building blocks of the conceptual framework, which is the main contribution of the present study. We have used Scopus database to search literature using keywords.

Findings

The study offers some interesting insights that may help scholars to advance theoretical debates. Moreover, the study also provides interesting direction to the practitioners engaged in supply chain management in data-driven environment. In this study, we have proposed a conceptual framework for the adoption of Industry 4.0 and SCI.

Research limitations/implications

In this study we have proposed a conceptual framework. However, the framework is yet to be empirically tested. Hence, we caution readers to evaluate the findings of the present study in context to its limitations. This is an attempt to develop a conceptual framework which may be tested using longitudinal data.

Originality/value

The present work helps in integrating two independent subjects', i.e. Industry 4.0 and SCI. The theoretical framework presented here integrates Industry 4.0 and SCI which can be useful to the practitioners and policymakers engaged in implementing Industry 4.0.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Liukai Wang, Ji Yan, Xiaohong Chen and Qifa Xu

The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap in the literature on supply chain finance (SCF) by exploring the relationship between network capabilities and corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap in the literature on supply chain finance (SCF) by exploring the relationship between network capabilities and corporate financial performance (CFP) in financial supply chains (FSCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect panel data and adopt regression analysis to analyse the joint investment activities among 1359 manufacturing firms and 289 financial service providers in China to explore how network capabilities, both network power and network centrality, improve CFP in the FSCs.

Findings

Under the FSCs environments, network centrality (i.e. eigenvector centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality) raises CFP (ROA, ROE and Tobin's Q) and network power (node degree, clustering coefficient) also improves CFP. However, node strength from the network power stream has a negative effect on Tobin's Q, indicating that when the partner of a firm has an extremely strong influence in FSCs; this weakens the bargaining ability and flexibility of the focal firm, thus reducing its long-term financial performance.

Practical implications

The joint investment activities among supply chain partners and financial service providers help managers understand the advanced financing solutions generated by internal and external network organisations as well as be aware of network capabilities' impact on CFP in FSCs.

Originality/value

This study answers the call for more empirical research on SCF to provide a broader sample to examine financial supply chain management. This is one of the earliest studies to shed light on a new perspective – how network capabilities improve CFP in the FSCs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2017

Dilupa Nakandala, Premaratne Samaranayake, Henry Lau and Krishnamurthy Ramanathan

Despite much research on supply chain (SC) integration and the growing emphasis on recent information technology advancements as an enabler of improved performance, there…

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1638

Abstract

Purpose

Despite much research on supply chain (SC) integration and the growing emphasis on recent information technology advancements as an enabler of improved performance, there has been limited research focussed specifically on information integration in supply chains (SCs). The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the literature on information integration in the fresh food supply chain (FFSC) from a holistic perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review is done by systematically collecting and analysing the recent literature to identify various participant entities of the FFSC information network and their specific information needs.

Findings

The information needs of FFSC entities are diverse but the needs are common across multiple entities.

Research limitations/implications

This study only reviewed the FFSC-related literature; an extended study of the food industry may reveal a more comprehensive view.

Practical implications

These findings are useful for practitioners in understanding the participant entities in the information network and their information needs and for policymakers in formulating FFSC development initiatives.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of another study that investigates the FFSC in a holistic approach, one that identifies the actors, their interactions and information needs.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2020

Luciano Novais, Juan Manuel Maqueira Marín and José Moyano-Fuentes

With support from the dynamic capabilities theory, this paper examines the role of Cloud Computing technology use in logistics (Cloud-Supported Logistics) and its effect…

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1080

Abstract

Purpose

With support from the dynamic capabilities theory, this paper examines the role of Cloud Computing technology use in logistics (Cloud-Supported Logistics) and its effect on business results in Lean manufacturing management (Lean Production implementation) and Supply Chain Integration contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the survey method, a random sample of 260 companies in intermediate positions in their supply chains was gathered from a population of 1,717 Spanish companies and used to test five hypotheses. The data were collected by telephone survey using a computerised system with a response rate of 15.6% (260 valid questionnaires). Structural equation modelling was used to test the five proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that Cloud-Supported Logistics use plays an important role in achieving better business results in Lean Production environments. Lean Production has been found to have both a direct effect and an even more powerful indirect effect on performance through the Cloud-Supported Logistics and Supply Chain Integration that these technologies produce. Supply Chain Integration is also found to have a mediating effect in the Cloud-Supported Logistics–performance relationship.

Originality/value

This study is valuable for academics and practitioners as it provides evidence of the relevant role played by Cloud-Supported Logistics in Lean Production implementation contexts. Cloud-Supported Logistics and Lean Production are strategically and operationally linked and their joint use results in Supply Chain Integration and better business performance.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Lara Schilling and Stefan Seuring

While the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on logistics and supply chain management (SCM) is recently much discussed, this is hardly linked to…

Abstract

Purpose

While the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on logistics and supply chain management (SCM) is recently much discussed, this is hardly linked to emerging economies and base of the pyramid (BoP) settings. The paper aims as offering a framework linking different conceptual elements to each other for explaining how ICT enables sustainable value creation in emerging economy supply chains (SCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on conceptual reasoning linking constructs from the different fields to each other.

Findings

Using conceptual reasoning linking constructs, six elements are identified: (1) SC flows, (2) BoP challenges and (3) ICT services as starting points, and environmental conditions driving sustainable value creation. The application of ICT within BoP SC operations drives the process of sustainable value creation by enabling new ways of (4) electronic business (e-business) transactions and (5) SSCM behaviors. This leads to (6) sustainable value for businesses using ICT applications and their respective stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical testing by collecting field data in emerging economy contexts would be demanded to address the limitation of building on conceptual reasonings.

Practical implications

The framework provides various SC-related measures driving e-business value creation for managers of businesses, charity organizations and policymakers in emerging communities.

Social implications

Understanding the use of smartphones and other mobile devices for businesses and their supply chains in emerging markets would have wide ranging social implication addressed in the sustainable value creation of the framework offered.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework brings different elements together offering insights into ICT applications in BoP SCs. Linking SCM, ICT and BoP to each other is a novel contribution having wider implications for the future development of emerging economies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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