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Article

Laura Jacobs and Richard Shuker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the treatment experiences of adult male perpetrators of filicide within prison therapeutic communities (TCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the treatment experiences of adult male perpetrators of filicide within prison therapeutic communities (TCs).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants took part in semi-structured interviews in order to capture their treatment experiences. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Five superordinate themes (therapeutic process; acceptance; insight; relationships; and barriers) and ten subordinate themes were identified. All themes were pertinent to understanding the participants’ experiences of TC treatment. The discussion provides reflections about the findings, contrasts them to psychological literature, along with suggestions for clinical practice and future research.

Originality/value

This research addressed a dearth of published literature within the area of male filicide and available treatment interventions.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article

Anne Leena Marika Kauppi, Tuija Vanamo, Kari Karkola and Juhani Merikanto

A parent who continuously physically abuses her/his child doesn't aim to kill the child but commits an accidental filicide in a more violent outburst of anger. Fatal abuse…

Abstract

A parent who continuously physically abuses her/his child doesn't aim to kill the child but commits an accidental filicide in a more violent outburst of anger. Fatal abuse deaths are prevented by recognition of signs of battering in time. Out of 200 examined intra-familial filicides, 23 (12%) were caused by child battering and 13 (7%) by continuous battering. The medical and court records of the victim and the perpetrator were examined. The perpetrator was the biological mother and the victim was male in 69 per cent of the cases. The abused children were either younger than one year or from two-and-a-half to four years old. Risk factors of the victim (being unwanted, premature birth, separation from the parent caused by hospitalization or custodial care, being ill and crying a lot) and the perpetrator (personality disorder, low socioeconomic status, chaotic family conditions, domestic violence, isolation, alcohol abuse) were common. The injuries caused by previous battering were mostly soft tissue injuries in head and limbs and head traumas and the battering lasted for days or even an year. The final assault was more violent and occurred when the parent was more anxious, frustrated or left alone with the child. The perpetrating parent was diagnosed as having a personality disorder (borderline, narcissistic or dependent) and often substance dependence (31%). None of them were psychotic. Authorities and community members should pay attention to the change in child's behavior and inexplicable injuries or absence from daycare. Furthermore if the parent is immature, alcohol dependent, have a personality disorder and is unable to cope with the demands the small child entails in the parent's life, the child may be in danger.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Book part

Melissa J. Tetzlaff-Bemiller

Purpose – This chapter aims to present an overview of what constitutes child murder, including definitions, history, prevalence, risk factors, offender motivations, and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to present an overview of what constitutes child murder, including definitions, history, prevalence, risk factors, offender motivations, and theoretical understanding.

Design/methodology/approach – The author uses secondary data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System, Uniformed Crime Reports, and Vital Statistics to show comparisons with previously conducted research. This allows for an overview of child murder.

Findings – There are numerous inconsistencies due to methodological issues. It is hard to find studies where a large sample was used. Definitions of child vary between studies, as does the age categories used. In addition, child homicide is predicted to be grossly underrepresented due to lack of communication between agencies, lack of formalized training, lack of a formalized classification system, and lack of reporting.

Originality/value – Research on child homicide can be instrumental in many areas including policy creation, implementation, and evaluation. It can serve as a benefit for those attempting to provide preventative measures. It may also help law enforcement with investigation. It is only through continued analysis of these types of cases and vigilant research, policy, and practice that society can more effectively protect young children from exposure to potentially murderous outcomes.

Details

Homicide and Violent Crime
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-876-5

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Article

Nicole Jansen van Rensburg, Ruan Spies and Lelanie Malan

This study aims to synthesise the available literature on the phenomenon of infanticide within the context of postpartum psychosis from a novel perspective using critical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to synthesise the available literature on the phenomenon of infanticide within the context of postpartum psychosis from a novel perspective using critical interpretive synthesis (CIS). The study placed its focus on the environmental aspects involved in the phenomenon of postpartum psychosis where the outcome was infanticide, as well as the chosen method of inflicting death.

Design/methodology/approach

CIS is a reviewing method that synthesises existing literature into a coherent frame with the exploration of literature at its core. CIS results in a natural critique of the body of literature and was critical to the study and its findings. The study ultimately found five synthetic constructs related to environmental aspects and method of inflicting death.

Findings

These included prior psychiatric history and care, demographics of perpetrators, perceptions on motherhood, profile on victims such as age and the method of death and, finally, the presence of “warning behaviour”. Reflections on the current state of the literature formed an important part of the study and enabled the authors to make recommendations for future research.

Research limitations/implications

The age of the literature acts as a limitation to the study, there is a need for updated to research to inform our current historical context. In addition, most of the included studies was based in developed countries which may impact on generalisability. The aim of he study was not to include an exhaustive body of literature, thus other relevant literature may have not been included. Some included studies did not solely focus on the concept of infanticide within the context of postpartum psychosis. Although efforts were made to ensure rigour, it is accepted that different researchers may come to different conclusion in inherently qualitative means of enquiry such as CIS. These included prior psychiatric history and care, demographics of perpetrators, perceptions on motherhood, profile on victims such as age and the method of death and, finally, the presence of “warning behaviour”. Reflections on the current state of the literature formed an important part of the study and enabled the authors to make recommendations for future research.

Originality/value

The study has not been published previously and all sources are credited. This study made a contribution by indicating important misconceptions about motherhood and the demography associated with infanticide in postpartum psychosis. It also highlighted the need for updated empirical research that may have implications for policy and practice

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Abstract

Details

The Cultural and Economic Context of Maternal Infanticide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-327-4

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Abstract

Details

The Cultural and Economic Context of Maternal Infanticide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-327-4

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Abstract

Details

The Cultural and Economic Context of Maternal Infanticide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-327-4

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Abstract

Details

The Cultural and Economic Context of Maternal Infanticide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-327-4

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Article

Thomas E. Joiner, Amy Lieberman, Ian H. Stanley and Mark A. Reger

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has prompted concerns about an increased risk for psychological distress, broadly and suicide mortality, specifically; it is, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has prompted concerns about an increased risk for psychological distress, broadly and suicide mortality, specifically; it is, as yet, unclear if these concerns will be realized, but they are plausible.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors demonstrate why researchers, clinicians, policymakers and other public health stakeholders should be vigilant to the potential increases in murder-suicide in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been reports of increased gun sales, alcohol sales, intimate partner violence and child neglect/abuse. These factors give one serious pause regarding the potential for murder-suicide, especially in the context of other pandemic-related stressors (e.g. loneliness, economic stress, health anxiety).

Originality/value

This paper highlights pandemic-related factors that might spur increased murder-suicide and encourages murder-suicide prevention efforts to take place alongside other pandemic-related public health interventions.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article

Jason Roach and Robin Bryant

In England and Wales, on average one child every week is a victim of homicide. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether different victim-risk profiles and suspect…

Abstract

Purpose

In England and Wales, on average one child every week is a victim of homicide. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether different victim-risk profiles and suspect variables can be differentiated for specific victim ages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a preliminary analysis of more than 1,000 child homicides committed in England and Wales between 1996 and 2013, from data provided through the Homicide Index. Statistical techniques such as cluster analysis were used to identify specific victim-risk profiles and to analyse suspect variables according to the age of victim.

Findings

The findings present a clearer picture of the risk-age relationship in child homicide, whereby several specific risk profiles are identified for specific child ages, comprised of crime variables including; likely victim and suspect demographics, the most likely circumstances of the homicide and methods of killing. Using similar techniques, a number of tentative clusters of suspects implicated in child homicide are also described and analysed, with suggestions of further analysis that might prove of value.

Practical implications

The practical implications cannot be understated. For those professionals working in the fields of child protection and criminal investigation the identification of risk profiles promises to provide a back-cloth with which to practice when confronted with complex and distressing child homicide scenarios. This research promises most to those currently training in related professions.

Originality/value

Although the statistical level of risk has been linked with the age of a child (with younger children being most vulnerable to killing by a parent or step-parent and older children most vulnerable to killing by acquaintances and strangers), extant research is yet to progress beyond the identification of broad age-risk categories. The paper concludes with a discussion of the likely implications for those charged with reducing and investigating child homicide and outlines the possibility of future research.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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