Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Lucy Benge and Andreas Neef

‘Planned relocation’ has emerged in the international climate policy arena as an ‘adaptation’ solution with the potential to enhance resilience, address underdevelopment…

Abstract

‘Planned relocation’ has emerged in the international climate policy arena as an ‘adaptation’ solution with the potential to enhance resilience, address underdevelopment and debunk age-old narratives around migration as a risk to peace and security. In 2018, Fiji became one of the first countries to develop Planned Relocation Guidelines, with upwards of 80 villages thought to require relocation over the coming years due to the impact of climate change. Through interviews carried out with representatives from organisations involved in planning for community relocations in Fiji, this chapter explores the creation of planned relocation as a form of climate change adaptation and development. Looking specifically at the value-based challenges of implementation in Fiji, this research provides insight into what happens when dominant international policy narratives play out in practice. Through the presentation of culturally nuanced ways of understanding the problem of climate-induced migration, this chapter invites policymakers to seek out these voices when devising displacement solutions.

Details

Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Suzanne C. Hopf, Sharynne McLeod and Sarah H. McDonagh

Fiji is a multicultural and linguistically multi-competent country. Historical ethnic divisions have socialised students into language friendships based around common…

Abstract

Purpose

Fiji is a multicultural and linguistically multi-competent country. Historical ethnic divisions have socialised students into language friendships based around common languages. Recent changes to educational policy, specifically the mandating of students learning all three of the Standard languages of Fiji (Fijian, Hindi, and English), have been introduced in hope that cross-linguistic understanding will encourage a greater sense of national identity amongst all Fijians regardless of ethnicity. This study explores one multilingual school environment considering students’ language use, attitudes and friendships in light of these policies.

Methodology/approach

A convergent mixed-methods research design using surveying, artefact collection, students’ drawing and observation was employed.

Findings

The majority of students reported some proficiency in the language of their inter-ethnic peers; however, students’ inter-ethnic friendships predominantly relied on English language use. It was observed that most friendships amongst these Fijian primary school students were still established according to main language use at home; however, inter-ethnic peer interaction in English was observed to be friendly and respectful. These language use patterns and friendship behaviours were potentially reinforced by individual and societal multilingualism, in addition to the school environment.

Originality/value

The chapter presents the first research linking Fijian primary school students’ language choices and friendship development.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2011

Parmod Chand and Chris Patel

The globalization of the world's economies has inevitably brought with it moves to establish a single set of financial reporting standards. Prima facie, the formulation…

Abstract

The globalization of the world's economies has inevitably brought with it moves to establish a single set of financial reporting standards. Prima facie, the formulation and promulgation of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) is concealed behind reified icons of “relevance.” This chapter adds a new dimension to the international accounting debate by discussing themes of regulation, public and private interests, from a critical perspective. Specifically, this chapter examines the reasons for the willingness to accept IFRS in Fiji. A critical conception of “relevance” and “accountability” is developed to demonstrate how the needs of private interests' are met in adopting the IFRS. This study demonstrates that in this process of convergence, the influence of these private interests – multinational enterprises and large international accounting firms – can lead to a transfer of economic resources in their favor, wherein the public interests are usually ignored. The study offers suggestions on how public interest might be best served within the current financial reporting system and how, in principle, the needs to report both globally and locally can be reconciled.

Details

Achieving Global Convergence of Financial Reporting Standards: Implications from the South Pacific Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-443-6

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2022

Partha Gangopadhyay, Rina Datt and Siddharth Jain

This chapter seeks to assess if there is any evidence that overseas development assistance (ODA), through its influence upon the climate-resilient grants and development…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to assess if there is any evidence that overseas development assistance (ODA), through its influence upon the climate-resilient grants and development grants, has impacted Fiji's developmental goals and climate resilience as a Small Island Development State (SIDS). To broaden the framework, it develops and applies two indicators of development and climate resilience for Fiji and seeks to establish – from the time series analysis – if these indicators bear a long-term and equilibrium relationship with the ODA for Fiji. By exploiting a suitable data set, it brings three important insights into the literature on climate shocks from global warming for SIDS. There are three critical elements found from the study: first, ODA did not play any role in reducing underdevelopment (DVIT) in Fiji. Secondly, ODA played an important role in increasing sustainability, or resilience, in Fiji: an increase in ODA by 1% increased sustainability, or resilience measured by the sustainability index SUS, by 0.24% at 1% level of significance. Finally, it is noted that oil price hikes compromised Fiji's resilience or sustainability. In the short-run, both ODA and OILP compromised the sustainability of Fiji.

Details

Globalization, Income Distribution and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-870-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Patricia Loga, Andrew Cardow and Andy Asquith

Violent geo-political conflicts are on the rise across the globe, particularly within fragile states. Using path-dependency theory, this paper aims to explore Fiji in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Violent geo-political conflicts are on the rise across the globe, particularly within fragile states. Using path-dependency theory, this paper aims to explore Fiji in the context of its public administrative history examining the legacies of history that have contributed to its ongoing conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

An archival document analysis along with a theoretical thematic analysis was used to collect and assess data. Themes were identified that explain how and when the conflict became path-dependent.

Findings

Analysing conflict as path-dependent demonstrates how indirect rule while Fiji was under colonial rule, and the short time it has taken for the nation to transition from a colony to an independent State contributed to the eruption of conflicts in Fiji.

Originality/value

The research makes two key contributions, namely, it develops a theoretical understanding of conflict using path-dependency theory and it uncovers legacies of colonialism that have shaped conflict in Fiji.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Mohsin Khan, Rup Singh, Arvind Patel and Devendra Kumar Jain

This paper aims to assess the equilibrium house price in the city of Suva (Fiji) and to analyse the house price bubble in the Fiji housing market.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the equilibrium house price in the city of Suva (Fiji) and to analyse the house price bubble in the Fiji housing market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a time series approach to determine the presence of house price bubbles in Fiji over the period from 1988 to 2018.

Findings

The findings suggest that real income, land cost, building material price, inflation rate, volatility, household size and wealth have a positive impact on house prices, whereas user cost of capital and political disturbances have a negative impact. The findings further indicate that the Fijis’ housing market does not constitute any house price bubble.

Practical implications

This paper draws policy implications for a small developing state (Fiji) and other similar economies.

Originality/value

The price bubble in the Fiji housing market is analysed for the first time. This paper develops a comprehensive empirical approach to assess the equilibrium-housing price in Fiji.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 30 September 2015

The economic outlook for Fiji.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB205645

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Paresh Kumar Narayan, Seema Narayan, Sagarika Mishra and Russell Smyth

The purpose of this paper is to examine the monetary policy transmission mechanism for the Fiji Islands using a structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) model for the…

1230

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the monetary policy transmission mechanism for the Fiji Islands using a structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) model for the period 1975 to 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

The SVAR model investigates how a monetary policy shock – defined as a temporary and exogenous rise in the short‐term interest rate – affects real and nominal macro variables; namely real output, prices, exchange rates, and money supply.

Findings

The results suggest that a monetary policy shock statistically significantly reduces output initially, but then output is able to recover to its pre‐shock level. A monetary policy shock generates inflationary pressure, leads to an appreciation of the Fijian currency and reduces the demand for money. The paper also analysed the impact of a nominal effective exchange rate (NEER) shock (an appreciation) on real output and found that it leads to a statistically significant negative effect on real output.

Practical implications

The findings of this study should be of direct relevance to the research and policy work undertaken at the Reserve Bank of Fiji.

Originality/value

For a small economy, such as Fiji, where monetary policy is key to sustainable macroeconomic management, this is the first paper that undertakes a dynamic analysis of monetary policy transmission. The paper uses time series data over three decades and builds a structural VAR model, rooted in theory. This paper will be of direct relevance to the Reserve Bank of Fiji. The approach and model proposed will also be useful for applied monetary policy researchers in other developing countries where inflation rate targeting is a key element of the monetary policy setting.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Jessie Lin

This paper explores the institutional challenges and opportunities in Fiji's integration into the global value chain. Fiji is naturally endowed with coconut palms across…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the institutional challenges and opportunities in Fiji's integration into the global value chain. Fiji is naturally endowed with coconut palms across its many islands. However, the coconut sector remains rudimentary with little value-addition. Coconut products of high-value are now being produced and exported throughout the world. While many coconut producing countries have benefitted from this coconut demand surge, Fiji has been unable to benefit from the international market.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a mixed-methods approach to analyze the challenges and opportunities. First, an analysis is done on a macro-level at the link between institutional quality and Fiji's export of coconut products. Then, primary data is collected with semi-structured interviews with key stakeholder groups in regions of Fiji. The goal is to gain an understanding of the perceived challenges and opportunities from each actor.

Findings

The empirical results show that institutional quality matters for Fiji's coconut exports. Increased scores in the government effectiveness and voice and accountability indicators enhance coconut exports from Fiji, suggesting that domestic institutions play an important role. Interviews with key actors reveal that communications among each stakeholder group are fragmented. The main institutional actors and the producers have different perceptions of the industry's challenges, thus resulting in different ideas on how to address the issues.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the data availability of coconut production and trade volume of more specific products. Furthermore, due to the transportation and weather constraints during our visit to Fiji, certain parts of the island were not accessible.

Originality/value

This paper uses a mixed-methods approach to assess a specific case study.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Umesh Sharma and Stewart Lawrence

This paper aims to extend the literature on public sector reforms in less‐developed countries in the Pacific. It seeks to examine the roles of accounting and control…

1569

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the literature on public sector reforms in less‐developed countries in the Pacific. It seeks to examine the roles of accounting and control systems in the reforming of two public sector organisations in Fiji: a process that was demanded by international financial agencies. The impacts of the reforms on the local population are also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method is employed. The empirical evidence is interpreted using Laughlin's, and Greenwood and Hinings's frameworks. The empirics are used to flesh out the skeletal model with specific cultural and political issues particular to Fiji.

Findings

Empirical evidence from two public sector organisations in Fiji that underwent structural reforms is used to illustrate the difficulties of transformation; and how the Fijian people's needs were not met for the purpose for which the organisations were established.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study is limited to two public sector enterprises in Fiji, it provides valuable insights into one country's public sector enterprises, and offers a platform for similar studies in other countries.

Practical implications

The case studies show the limitations of the introduction of private sector managerialism into state‐sector organisations. There are implications for state sector organisations in Fiji and elsewhere in the Pacific.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the literature of developing countries. There are cultural and political influences specific to Fiji that trigger resistance to change from public service values to commercial business norms. Such cultural and political influences may not be so pertinent in western industrialised countries.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000