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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

A number of subject-orientated and general websites have emerged to host academic resources. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the uptake of such services in order…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of subject-orientated and general websites have emerged to host academic resources. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the uptake of such services in order to decide which depositing strategies are effective and should be encouraged.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the views and shares of resources in the generic repository Figshare by subject category and resource type.

Findings

Figshare use and common resource types vary substantially by subject category but resources can be highly viewed even in subjects with few members. More active subject areas do not tend to have more viewed or shared resources.

Research limitations/implications

The view counts and share counts analysed may reflect author accesses or may be spammed.

Practical implications

Limited uptake of Figshare within a subject area should not be a barrier to its use. Several highly successful innovative uses for Figshare show that it can reach beyond a purely academic audience.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of the uptake and use of a generic academic resource sharing repository.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Zeynep Burcu Acunaş Karagöz, Selman Demirtaş, Hakan Kaleli, Levent Yüksek and Emre Çıtak

This study aims to find out friction and wear characteristics of graphene and graphene coating deposited by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process on Honda GX270…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find out friction and wear characteristics of graphene and graphene coating deposited by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process on Honda GX270 engine (nodular cast iron) piston rings experimentally investigated under boundary lubricated conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study consists of two stages: tribotest and engine tests. First test was conducted through a reciprocating tribotest machine and second test was conducted through an engine bench with a duration of 75h. Engine piston ring was coated with graphene by two different methods: transfer method and direct CVD method.

Findings

Graphene has been demonstrated to be a potential and promising candidate for wear- and scratch-resistant coating because it is the thinnest, lightest and strongest known nanomaterial. In this case, the ability of a mono-layer graphene film to withstand high pressure differences (6 atm) indicates its mechanical robustness. It can effectively prevent or reduce mechanical failure by strengthening and toughening the loaded surface as well as by transferring the stress throughout the structure. The positive tribological outcomes of the graphene reinforced material under various dynamic loads revealed the potential of graphene-based coatings in macro - and micro-tribology.

Originality/value

This study fulfils an identified need to study for automotive industry a coating which is wear and scratch resistant.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Jane Cho

Based on the data from Figshare repositories, the purpose of this paper is to analyze which research data are actively produced and shared in the interdisciplinary field…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the data from Figshare repositories, the purpose of this paper is to analyze which research data are actively produced and shared in the interdisciplinary field of library and information science (LIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Co-occurrence analysis was performed on keywords assigned to research data in the field of LIS, which were archived in the Figshare repository. By analyzing the keyword network using the pathfinder algorithm, the study identifies key areas where data production is actively conducted in LIS, and examines how these results differ from the conventional intellectual structure of LIS based on co-citation or bibliographic coupling analysis.

Findings

Four major domains – Open Access, Scholarly Communication, Data Science and Informatics – and 15 sub-domains were created. The keywords with the highest global influence appeared as follows, in descending order: “open access,” “scholarly communication” and “altmetrics.”

Originality/value

This is the first study to understand the key areas that actively produce and utilize data in the LIS field.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Lutz Bornmann

– The purpose of this case study is to investigate the usefulness of altmetrics for measuring the broader impact of research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to investigate the usefulness of altmetrics for measuring the broader impact of research.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study is based on a sample of 1,082 the Public Library of Science (PLOS) journal articles recommended in F1000. The data set includes altmetrics which were provided by PLOS. The F1000 data set contains tags on papers which were assigned by experts to characterise them.

Findings

The most relevant tag for altmetric research is “good for teaching”, as it is assigned to papers which could be of interest to a wider circle of readers than the peers in a specialised area. One could expect papers with this tag to be mentioned more often on Facebook and Twitter than those without this tag. The results from regression models were able to confirm these expectations: papers with this tag show significantly higher Facebook and Twitter counts than papers without this tag. This clear association could not be seen with Mendeley or Figshare counts (that is with counts from platforms which are chiefly of interest in a scientific context).

Originality/value

The results of the current study indicate that Facebook and Twitter, but not Figshare or Mendeley, might provide an indication of which papers are of interest to a broader circle of readers (and not only for the peers in a specialist area), and could therefore be useful for the measurement of the societal impact of research.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Kasper Abcouwer and Emiel van Loon

Low read rates are a general problem in library inventories. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that contribute to the success of library inventory by…

Abstract

Purpose

Low read rates are a general problem in library inventories. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that contribute to the success of library inventory by means of a radio-frequency identification (RFID) inventory taker. The factors investigated were tag position, tag orientation, book thickness, tag density (related to thickness of a sequence of books) and position on the shelf.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 210 books were placed in eight random permutations on three fixed book shelves. For each configuration, the RFID tags were read forty times. The resulting data were analysed by means of a generalized linear model, relating the combined contribution of tag position, tag orientation, book thickness and position on the bookshelf to the read rate.

Findings

The tags positioned directly next to the spine were always read, but those near the opening of the book (far from the spine and inventory reader) were not always read. Considering only books with tags near the opening, tag orientation and position on the shelf appeared not to be related to the read rate, while book thickness, thickness over three books and spine tag density appeared to have a small positive contribution to the read rate.

Practical implications

Low read rates during a library inventory can be prevented by placing the tags near the book spine – the other book specific factors (listed in the previous paragraph) are of little influence. When not scanned during a first sweep, repeated scanning can increase the read rate with 0.15.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to analyse the influence of tag location and book specific factors on the read rate of RFID tags in library books. The experimental approach sets an example for future work.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Mike Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha

Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Data sharing mandates are increasingly being adopted by journals and the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Data sharing mandates are increasingly being adopted by journals and the purpose of this paper is to assess whether they work.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines two evolutionary biology journals, Evolution and Heredity, that have data sharing mandates and make extensive use of Dryad. It uses a quantitative analysis of presence in Dryad, downloads and citations.

Findings

Within both journals, data sharing seems to be complete, showing that the mandates work on a technical level. Low correlations (0.15-0.18) between data downloads and article citation counts for articles published in 2012 within these journals indicate a weak relationship between data sharing and research impact. An average of 40-55 data downloads per article after a few years suggests that some use is found for shared life sciences data.

Research limitations/implications

The value of shared data uses is unclear.

Practical implications

Data sharing mandates should be encouraged as an effective strategy.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of the effectiveness of data sharing mandates.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2017

Libby Bishop and Daniel Gray

The focus of this chapter is the intersection of social media, publication, data sharing, and research ethics. By now there is an extensive literature on the use of social…

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is the intersection of social media, publication, data sharing, and research ethics. By now there is an extensive literature on the use of social media in research. There is also excellent work on challenges of postpublication sharing of social media, primarily focused on legal restrictions, technical infrastructure, and documentation. This chapter attempts to build upon and extend this work by using cases to deepen the analysis of ethical issues arising from publishing and sharing social media data. Publishing will refer to the presentation of data extracts, aggregations, or summaries, while sharing refers to the practice of making the underlying data available postpublication for others to use. It will look at the ethical questions that arise both for researchers (or others) sharing data, and those who are using data that has been made available by others, emphasizing the inherently relational nature of data sharing. The ethical challenges researchers face when considering sharing user-generated content collected from social media platforms are the focus of the cases. The chapter begins by summarizing the general principles of research ethics, then identifies the specific ethical challenges from sharing social media data and positions these challenges in the context of these general principles. These challenges are then analyzed in more detail with cases from research projects that drew upon several different genres of social media. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for practical guidance and considers the future of ethical practice in sharing social media data.

Details

The Ethics of Online Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-486-6

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Bryan G. Cook, Lydia A. Beahm, Anna Moriah Myers, Victoria J. VanUitert and Sarah Emily Wilson

Scientific research provides a reliable means for developing and accumulating knowledge bases to guide policy and practice. However, evidence from meta-research and…

Abstract

Scientific research provides a reliable means for developing and accumulating knowledge bases to guide policy and practice. However, evidence from meta-research and large-scale replication projects suggests that the published research base likely reflects bias, which threatens the validity and credibility of research-based recommendations. Moreover, there is limited accessibility to research reports, which limits the impact and application of scientific research. In this chapter, we propose that open-science reforms, which aim to make the research process as open and transparent as possible, can be applied to help address these issues. We describe and discuss four open-science practices – preregistration and Registered Reports, open data and materials, open peer review, and open access and preprints – and propose that they may become one of the next big things in special education research.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

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