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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

James A. Hunt

The aim of this paper is to provide an update on the status of current fieldbuses and high‐speed Ethernet technologies for industrial automation.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide an update on the status of current fieldbuses and high‐speed Ethernet technologies for industrial automation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides information on the various fieldbus technologies for industrial automation connectivity and examines high‐speed deterministic Ethernets for automated manufacturing and assembly plant.

Findings

The paper finds that the standards issue has still not been fully resolved, that Ethernets reduce manufacturing costs compared with conventional fieldbuses, that most effort has gone into making Ethernets work deterministically, rather than concentrating on IT and enterprise resource planning (ERP) integration, and that the internet will increasingly feed real‐time data to ERP levels.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on recent developments in Ethernet technologies.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Donal Heffernan and Paula Doyle

In industrial distributed control environments for automation technology, Ethernet network based solutions are gaining prominence in the traditional fieldbus application…

Abstract

In industrial distributed control environments for automation technology, Ethernet network based solutions are gaining prominence in the traditional fieldbus application areas with the promise of standardised solutions that can support real‐time operation to a resolution of less than 1 μm. However, there are no formal standards for a real‐time Industrial Ethernet. This paper looks at some of the emerging de facto solutions and describes a novel project where clusters of real‐time transducer networks are developed and the control is tightly synchronised using the IEEE 1588 clock synchronisation standard, realising a “Time‐triggered Ethernet” solution.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Richard Piggin

Safety‐related fieldbus is now being employed in many varied applications. Developments in fieldbus technology and programmable systems, coupled with developments in…

Abstract

Safety‐related fieldbus is now being employed in many varied applications. Developments in fieldbus technology and programmable systems, coupled with developments in International and European Standards have created the opportunity for widespread use. Performance, equipment availability, flexibility, diagnostics and reduced cost of ownership are the principal reasons for rapid growth in safety‐related networking. The use of programmable safety systems has fundamentally have changed the way in which safety is now being engineered in the manufacturing plant. New devices provide direct connectivity to safety‐related networks, increasing the scope and changing the architecture of safety systems far beyond conventional expectations. Technological developments, application and benefits of safety‐related networking in industrial automation systems are shown. Criteria for safety network selection are highlighted.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

R.S.H. Piggin

Ethernet continues to evolve as a viable fieldbus technology for industrial automation. This paper seeks to discuss the development of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP…

Abstract

Purpose

Ethernet continues to evolve as a viable fieldbus technology for industrial automation. This paper seeks to discuss the development of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) for Ethernet and standards with particular reference to time synchronisation, real time motion control and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The CIP is introduced, with an overview of four network adaptations: CompoNet, DeviceNet, ControlNet, and EtherNet/IP. Developments in the EtherNet/IP implementation are discussed, along with key features. These include CIP Safety to meet the requirements for safety‐related control, CIP Sync for time synchronisation across CIP networks and CIP motion for real‐time closed loop motion control.

Findings

Standard, unmodified Ethernet will support time synchronisation, real time motion control and safety‐related applications with the CIP adaptation EtherNet/IP. The CIP enables complete integration of control with information, multiple CIP networks and internet technologies. CIP provides seamless communication from the plant floor throughout the enterprise, with a scalable and coherent architecture, incorporating functionality, such as safety, time synchronisation and motion control, hitherto only available with specialised or incompatible networks.

Practical implications

The implementations of CIP Sync, CIP Motion and CIP Safety and the corresponding standards provide functionality and flexibility not available from disparate specialist networks. The ability to fully integrate internet technologies and safety, synchronisation, motion and safety together is a distinguishing feature. Industrial Ethernet technologies vary in the ability to integrate to the same level of functionality and offer similar flexibility.

Originality/value

The development of CIP technology and the use of open standards are described. The opportunity to use the combination of an established automation protocol and standard, unmodified Ethernet provides potential cost benefits, flexibility, and innovative solutions, whilst providing integration, performance and cost advantages.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Donal Heffernan and Don Murphy

The hardware and software development of a remotely controlled hydraulic valve assembly is described. The valve becomes a dedicated server in a distributed control…

Abstract

The hardware and software development of a remotely controlled hydraulic valve assembly is described. The valve becomes a dedicated server in a distributed control environment. The communication system is an Ethernet network supporting the UDP/IP communications protocol. A client/server application model is developed that allows a client to specify a desired control position for a valve spool. The solution is being proposed as an alternative to a formal fieldbus solution, where precision real‐time operation is not required. The performance of the valve is measured under different configurations considering both open loop and closed loop models. The justification for selecting the UDP/IP protocol is stated. The resulting hydraulic valve control system is efficient, accurate and flexible.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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