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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

N.P. Mahalik and P.R. Moore

During recent years, in the field of real‐time instrumentation and process control, there has been a trend away from centralized control system. Distributed control by…

Abstract

During recent years, in the field of real‐time instrumentation and process control, there has been a trend away from centralized control system. Distributed control by using fieldbus technology is only the first step to application of intelligence in the field devices. Compares centralized systems with the distributed systems, differentiates the conventional LANs from the fieldbus technology and reviews the related technology and the current status of the international fieldbus standards. Describes some of the standard fieldbuses. Highlights the advantages of using fieldbuses in the real‐time process control and discusses what are the points to be considered before selecting a fieldbus. Highlights fieldbus‐based design development methodology involved in order to build a real‐time industrial distributed control system (RIDCS). Presents a case study with the LonWorks Technology; a fieldbus category system.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

N.P. Mahalik and S.K. Lee

Almost all industrial systems are distributed with multiple control points which interact to a limited extent, for which the idea of distribution of task at local (field…

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1267

Abstract

Almost all industrial systems are distributed with multiple control points which interact to a limited extent, for which the idea of distribution of task at local (field) level is emerging. As locally‐based application tasks can reduce control delays, a fieldbus‐based smart and reliable DCS solution is recognised as a leader for real‐time industrial automation. Advanced control system has turned itself towards the implementation of digital distributed control systems (DCS) from centralised control systems. The phenomenon is becoming very popular because of its advantages over the whole operating system. Presents a case study for realising manufacturing systems (production lines) with fieldbus technology. The local operating network (LON) fieldbus system was chosen for this purpose because of availability of a wide range of products. Emphasises the reliability aspects of the control systems. A representative of a conveyor system, integrated with field devices, was conceived as the target platform.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Peter Neumann

Discusses the distribution of application functions to process‐oriented field devices and process‐remote components in distributed automation systems. Describes the use of…

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436

Abstract

Discusses the distribution of application functions to process‐oriented field devices and process‐remote components in distributed automation systems. Describes the use of fieldbus systems, function block technology based on standardised function blocks and a suitable infrastructure to enable these function blocks to cooperate during run time.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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47

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Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Richard Piggin

Safety‐related fieldbus is now being employed in many varied applications. Developments in fieldbus technology and programmable systems, coupled with developments in…

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1065

Abstract

Safety‐related fieldbus is now being employed in many varied applications. Developments in fieldbus technology and programmable systems, coupled with developments in International and European Standards have created the opportunity for widespread use. Performance, equipment availability, flexibility, diagnostics and reduced cost of ownership are the principal reasons for rapid growth in safety‐related networking. The use of programmable safety systems has fundamentally have changed the way in which safety is now being engineered in the manufacturing plant. New devices provide direct connectivity to safety‐related networks, increasing the scope and changing the architecture of safety systems far beyond conventional expectations. Technological developments, application and benefits of safety‐related networking in industrial automation systems are shown. Criteria for safety network selection are highlighted.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Richard Piggin, Ken Young and Richard McLaughlin

This paper reviews current and proposed fieldbus standards that affect Europe. Relevant technologies and the formation of standards are shown. The initial goal of a single…

Abstract

This paper reviews current and proposed fieldbus standards that affect Europe. Relevant technologies and the formation of standards are shown. The initial goal of a single global standard and the recognition of a number of emerging de facto standards are discussed, as is the potential future standardisation of fieldbus technology.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

James A. Hunt

The aim of this paper is to provide an update on the status of current fieldbuses and high‐speed Ethernet technologies for industrial automation.

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1121

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide an update on the status of current fieldbuses and high‐speed Ethernet technologies for industrial automation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides information on the various fieldbus technologies for industrial automation connectivity and examines high‐speed deterministic Ethernets for automated manufacturing and assembly plant.

Findings

The paper finds that the standards issue has still not been fully resolved, that Ethernets reduce manufacturing costs compared with conventional fieldbuses, that most effort has gone into making Ethernets work deterministically, rather than concentrating on IT and enterprise resource planning (ERP) integration, and that the internet will increasingly feed real‐time data to ERP levels.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on recent developments in Ethernet technologies.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Richard Piggin and Ken Young

Standards have restricted the use of networks and programmable electronics in safety‐related applications. New standards have released technology to enable improvements in…

Abstract

Standards have restricted the use of networks and programmable electronics in safety‐related applications. New standards have released technology to enable improvements in safety and ensure developments take place within an overall safety framework. Best practice in the additional protocol enhancements required is discussed. The installation of a safety‐related fieldbus, replacing conventional hardwiring in a machine safety system is used to illustrate the potential of the technology. The use of fieldbus in safety‐related applications is shown to reduce complexity and enhance functionality, whilst enabling significantly reduced ownership cost.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Conal Watterson, Donal Heffernan and Hassan Kaghazchi

To emphasise the need for remote fieldbus diagnostics and to show a technical solution based on industry standard approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

To emphasise the need for remote fieldbus diagnostics and to show a technical solution based on industry standard approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The design and approach takes a Profibus fieldbus, as an example candidate, and captures the diagnostic data using an OPC model and then uses a Java RMI object broker to develop/support the remote end clients.

Findings

The findings show, by an implementation example, that it is possible to implement remote diagnostics for a fieldbus network, without interfering with the operation of the network. The findings also highlight the need for security in such a solution.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation example is rather cumbersome, but the paper suggests that all the hardware and software could be implemented on a single embedded processor in a single box. The security issues are flagged as a possible limitation, but solution approaches are briefly suggested.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the lack of standardisation around fieldbus diagnostics. Even for the same fieldbus type, different manufacturers will use different diagnostic protocols and codes. This paper suggests a practical implementation, where the diagnostic codes can be interpreted a fixed stage and presented to an end client in a consistent manner.

Originality/value

This work is based on a two year original research project. The solution makes heavy use of industry standard protocols but the work is original.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Derek Paul Lane

Describes the modularity and flexibility of the WAGO I/O systems allowing connectivity of sensors and actuators to PLCs and PCs via the major fieldbus systems, and…

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181

Abstract

Describes the modularity and flexibility of the WAGO I/O systems allowing connectivity of sensors and actuators to PLCs and PCs via the major fieldbus systems, and concludes that a modular approach leads to a greater saving in installed costs, installation and commissioning times for factory automation projects.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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