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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Bo Xu, Huaqing Min and Fangxiong Xiao

This article aims to provide a brief overview of the field now known as “evolutionary developmental robotics (evo-devo-robo)”, which is based on the concept and principles…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide a brief overview of the field now known as “evolutionary developmental robotics (evo-devo-robo)”, which is based on the concept and principles of evolutionary and development principles such as evolutionary developmental psychology, evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) and evolutionary cognitive neuroscience.

Design/methodology/approach

Evo-devo-robo is a new field bringing together developmental robotics and evolutionary robotics to form a new research area. Basic concepts and the origins of the field are described, and then some basic principles of evo-devo-robo that have been developed so far are discussed.

Findings

Finally, some misunderstand concepts and the most promising future research developments in this area are discussed.

Originality/value

Basic concepts and the origins of the field are described, and then some basic principles of evo-devo-robo that have been developed so far are discussed. Finally, some misunderstood concepts and the most promising future research developments in this area are discussed.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Kate Letheren, Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Lucas Whittaker, Stephen Whyte and Uwe Dulleck

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a critical literature review that examines the origins and development of research on service robots in organizations…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a critical literature review that examines the origins and development of research on service robots in organizations, as well as the key emotional and cognitive issues between service employees, customers, and robots. This review provides a foundation for future research that leverages the emotional connection between service robots and humans.

Design/Methodology/Approach A critical literature review that examines robotics, artificial intelligence, emotions, approach/avoid behavior, and cognitive biases is conducted.

Findings – This research provides six key themes that emerge from the current state of research in the field of service robotics with 14 accompanying research questions forming the basis of a research agenda. The themes presented are as follows: Theme 1: Employees have a forgotten “dual role”; Theme 2: The influence of groups is neglected; Theme 3: Opposing emotions lead to uncertain outcomes; Theme 4: We know how robots influence engagement, but not experience; Theme 5: Trust is necessary but poorly understood; and Theme 6: Bias is contagious: if the human mind is irrational…so too are robot minds.

Practical Implications – Practically, this research provides guidance for researchers and practitioners alike regarding the current state of research, gaps, and future directions. Importantly for practitioners, it sheds light on themes in the use of AI and robotics in services, highlighting opportunities to consider the dual role of the employee, examines how incorporating a service robot influences all levels of the organization, addresses motivational conflicts for employees and customers, explores how service robots influence the whole customer experience and how trust is formed, and how we are (often inadvertently) creating biased robots.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Lorella Gabriele, Assunta Tavernise and Francesca Bertacchini

Educational Robotics is a research field aimed at promoting an active engaging learning through the artifacts students create and the phenomena they simulate. In fact…

Abstract

Educational Robotics is a research field aimed at promoting an active engaging learning through the artifacts students create and the phenomena they simulate. In fact, designing, building, and programming a small robot, users discover and learn in a playful and joyful way. Moreover, the constructivist approach fosters the development of creative and critical skills, as well as problem-solving, communication skills, cooperation, and teamwork. This chapter presents the results of a research with university students, carried out at the Università della Calabria (Italy): an Educational Robotics laboratory has been integrated in a Cognitive Psychology Course in order to examine the kind of learning, workgroup retention, and engagement. Outcomes show that engaging experiences can remarkably enhance students’ learning efficiency and retention of the acquired materials. Moreover, a rich interaction can provide entertaining and appealing experiences capable of promoting learning and understanding.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Immersive Interfaces: Virtual Worlds, Gaming, and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-241-7

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Vincent Wing Sun Tung and Rob Law

The purpose of this study is to review recent work in the robotics literature and identify future opportunities for consumer/tourist experience research in human-robot…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review recent work in the robotics literature and identify future opportunities for consumer/tourist experience research in human-robot interactions (HRIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by covering the framework of robotic agent presence and embodiment that are relevant for HRI. Next, the paper identifies future opportunities for hospitality and tourism scholars to undertake consumer/tourist experience research in HRIs.

Findings

The result of this study provided potential directions for advancing theoretical, methodological and managerial implications for tourism experience research in HRI.

Research limitations/implications

Concepts from robotics research are diffusing into a range of disciplines, from engineering to social sciences. These advancements open many unique, yet urgent, opportunities for hospitality and tourism research.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates the speed at which robotics research is progressing. Moreover, the concepts reviewed in this research on robotic presence and embodiment are relevant for real-world applications in hospitality and tourism.

Social implications

Developments in robotics research will transform hospitality and tourism experiences in the future.

Originality/value

This research is one of the early papers in the field to review robotics research and provide innovative directions to broaden the interdisciplinary perspective for future hospitality and tourism research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

H. Schempf, E. Mutschler, B. Chemel, S. Boehmke, C. Piepgras and W. Crowley

The big‐on‐asbestos (BOA) system is a mobile pipe‐external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos‐containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from…

Abstract

The big‐on‐asbestos (BOA) system is a mobile pipe‐external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos‐containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the Department of Energy (DoE) weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Joanne Pransky

The purpose of this article is to present a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of the Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of the Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a prominent, robotic industry engineer-turned entrepreneur regarding the evolution, commercialization and challenges of bringing a technological invention to market.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Professor Moshe Shoham, Director of the Robotics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. Professor Shoham is also the Founder of Mazor Robotics Ltd. and the co-founder of Microbot Medical. As a pioneer of new and developing fields in medical robotics, Shoham describes his major advancements and innovative approaches.

Findings

Professor Moshe Shoham has BSc in Aeronautical Engineering, MSc and DSc in Mechanical Engineering from Technion, where he has been teaching for the past nearly 30 years, and is currently the Tamara and Harry Handelsman Academic Chair in the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering. The Technion is renowned for the ingenuity of its graduates, who comprise 70 per cent of Israel’s founders and managers of high-tech industries, making Israel the greatest concentration of high-tech start-up companies anywhere outside of Silicon Valley, California, USA. Along with Technion’s expert faculty, students and facilities, Professor Shoham founded Mazor Robotics in 2001 and co-founded Microbot Medical Ltd. in 2010.

Originality/value

Professor Shoham, a worldwide acclaimed authority in the field of robotics whose life work is dedicated to developing technologies that improve patient care, is the inventor of the first commercially available mechanical guidance system for spine surgery, the Mazor Robotics Renaissance™ Guidance System. He is also the visionary and creator of the unprecedented Microbot ViRob, an Autonomous Advancing Micro Robot, <1 mm in diameter, which has the ability to crawl within cavities/lumens, allowing physicians to target a disease site with exquisite precision. His latest work includes a revolutionary swimming Micro Robot and the new Mazor Renaissance® Brain Surgery. Professor Shoham holds 30 patents and more than a dozen awards, including the recent prestigious 2013 Thomas A. Edison Patent Award and the election into the National Academy of Engineering.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Joanne Pransky

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The following paper is a “Q&A interview” conducted by Joanne Pransky of Industrial Robot Journal as a method to impart the combined technological, business and personal experience of a robotic industry engineer-turned-innovator regarding the challenges of bringing technological discoveries to fruition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The interviewee is Tony Koselka, Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer, Vision Robotics Corporation (VRC). In this interview, Koselka shares how he first got started in the robotics field along with his experiences in running his start-up.

Findings

Koselka earned a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from MIT. Prior to his work at VRC, he successfully co-founded and sold his first start-up, CyberGear. VRC was formed in 1999 with the goal to develop autonomous robotic solutions that focused on vision-based mapping. With strategic partners, the team began work on consumer applications that enabled the company to create a uniquely robust and cost-effective approach to robotics. It entered the agricultural market in 2004 with a feasibility study for harvesting oranges. While waiting for picking-hand technology to catch up with the machine vision, the initial concept transformed into a deployable crop-load estimation system for tree fruit. In 2011, VRC was approached by lettuce growers to develop a lettuce thinner. In a few months, the company built its lettuce thinner, which was released in 2012 and since then has collectively thinned hundreds of thousands of acres.

Originality/value

Koselka is an award-winning design engineer who holds 21 US patents. He has managed the design of all the mechanical systems of his start-up, VRC, including those on the lettuce thinner and the grapevine pruner, which enable robots to intelligently and accurately perform myriad tasks, including pruning, weeding and thinning.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Mads Hvilshøj, Simon Bøgh, Oluf Skov Nielsen and Ole Madsen

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investigates the missing links and gaps between the research and developments efforts and the real‐world application requirements, in order to bring the AIMM technology from laboratories to manufacturing environments. The investigation is based on 12 general application requirements for robotics: sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot‐robot interaction, human‐robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties.

Findings

The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry) with a quick and gentle overview of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper identifies key open issues and promising research directions to realize real‐world integration and maturation of the AIMM technology.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the interdisciplinary research field, autonomous industrial mobile manipulation (AIMM).

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Siwalik Mishra and Sonali Bhattacharya

The purpose of this study is to identify and understand key strategies relating to the staffing, employee experience and employer branding of an inventive startup in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify and understand key strategies relating to the staffing, employee experience and employer branding of an inventive startup in robotics training and consumer robotics manufacturing space, keeping in mind the constraints and challenges faced by the company right from the beginning to date.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-based method approach has been used. The Founder-Chief executive officer was interviewed multiple times. Interviews were transcribed for further analysis. Data was also sourced from the company website, news and digital media reports.

Findings

Human resource strategies used by the company in venturing out in this niche market were explored and linked to the concepts of staffing, employee experience and employer branding. This case can be used for teaching the human resource challenges of a growing start-up.

Practical implications

With the help of this case, readers may be able to appreciate the practice of critical concepts of staffing and employee experience in a growing startup.

Originality/value

The premise of a budding start-up in a niche industry, such as robotics training in educational institutions and manufacturing of small-scale consumer robotics, adds to the novelty of the case.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Emerson Hilker

We have long been obsessed with the dream of creating intelligent machines. This vision can be traced back to Greek civilization, and the notion that mortals somehow can…

Abstract

We have long been obsessed with the dream of creating intelligent machines. This vision can be traced back to Greek civilization, and the notion that mortals somehow can create machines that think has persisted throughout history. Until this decade these illusions have borne no substance. The birth of the computer in the 1940s did cause a resurgence of the cybernaut idea, but the computer's role was primarily one of number‐crunching and realists soon came to respect the enormous difficulties in crafting machines that could accomplish even the simplest of human tasks.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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