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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Femi Olubodun

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable primary causes of defects in local authority housing stock with the view to…

1471

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable primary causes of defects in local authority housing stock with the view to identifying which groups of building components are associated with one another. It is primarily based on responses to a questionnaire from building surveyors who were involved in the day‐to‐day diagnosis of defects of a large local authority housing stock. The intercorrelations among the primary defect‐causing factors demanded the application of principal component analysis to determine the factors affecting deterioration of the building fabric. This resulted in the extraction of nine significant factors which combine to exert their influence on the building.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Femi Olubodun and Trevor Mole

This paper sets out to analyse and interpret factors which bear upon building components and to explore underlying relationships among the number of building components…

1878

Abstract

This paper sets out to analyse and interpret factors which bear upon building components and to explore underlying relationships among the number of building components forming a construction entity. The research hypothesis was set as follows: building surveyors do not agree in assessing the strength of each of design, construction, age, changing standards and vandalism as a causative factor for defects on building components. Previous studies have established the factors pertaining to defects in the building structure. What is in dispute is the extent to which these factors are important in causing defects. The objective of the study presented in this paper is therefore to assess the impact of each of five key factors ‐ design, construction, standards, vandalism and age ‐ on 28 selected building components with the aid of questionnaire information provided by 45 local authority building surveyors involved in the day‐to‐day diagnosis of defects in public housing stock. In so doing, the tangible influence of the factors in terms of how they affect defect causation in building components for the sample is established.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper seeks to explore the satisfaction rating associated with the repair and maintenance of 34 most occurring house defects remedied by owner‐occupiers selected from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the satisfaction rating associated with the repair and maintenance of 34 most occurring house defects remedied by owner‐occupiers selected from a stratified random sample.

Design/methodology/approach

The study targeted over 1,200 owner‐occupiers from 12 local authority wards; these were identified on the basis of the Ward Index of Multiple Deprivation. The sample also included some neighbourhoods recently designated for improvement under the Urban Renewal's Single Regeneration Budget initiative within the Northwest of England.

Findings

Through the use of nonparametric statistical techniques, the paper argues that owner‐occupiers' expectation of the quality of maintenance works is a derivative dichotomy of unrelated decision constructs: on the one hand is the prior knowledge of the severity of house defects which, in turn, impacts on the follow‐on repair strategies and maintenance quality expectations. On the other hand are the projected improvements as perceived in terms of the added value to a dwelling vis‐à‐vis the principal methods of remediation enshrined within the broader renewal initiatives.

Originality/value

Overall, the results suggest that expectations on maintenance quality ought to be defined as owner‐occupiers' perception of desired standard of work relative to the projected market value of their property. The study further concludes that, when all the notable variations in the satisfaction rating on follow‐on maintenance strategies and expectations are considered together, it is the perceived increase in the value of a property – following improvement works under the urban renewal programme – that stands out as the main influencing criterion.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

The purpose of this paper is to espouse Triggernomic Repair Process Analysis (TRAP), a nonlinear theoretical methodology employed to stress the importance of an informed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to espouse Triggernomic Repair Process Analysis (TRAP), a nonlinear theoretical methodology employed to stress the importance of an informed approach to the diagnosis and prognosis of structural building defects at the owner‐occupier level.

Design/methodology/approach

TRAP analysis focuses on the diagnosis limitations relating to house repair and maintenance among owner‐occupiers in the UK, based on a stratified random survey of owner‐occupiers' maintenance decisions.

Findings

It is concluded that lack of technical skills‐knowledge awareness is one of the main deterrents to efficient defect diagnosis. The failing on defect diagnosis is broadly defined as resulting from Chronic Deficiency of Defects Diagnosis (CD3). CD3 is furthermore conceptualised as a theoretical dichotomy construct which persists due to Chronic Diagnosis Failure (CDF) and Chronic Misapplication of Maintenance Remedies (CMMR).

Originality/value

The constructs identified help to explain why owner‐occupier housing disrepair remains high and a source of concern among practitioners in the UK. A pro‐maintenance housing regeneration agenda is imminent in order to promote technical skill‐knowledge awareness and the effectiveness of the maintenance decision making among owner‐occupiers.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper sets out to explore and detect underlying causes to increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account…

Abstract

This paper sets out to explore and detect underlying causes to increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account of owner‐occupiers' experience on the standards of work they encounter with small‐scale domestic traders. Part I, in a previous issue, focused on the consensus ranking of 13 building maintenance standards or attributes that owner‐occupiers expect from builders (Xbmas) while part II focuses on the contrast between expectations and the actual maintenance setbacks observed from builders (Obmas) and which are a source of displeasure among owner‐occupiers. The application of nonparametric statistical techniques enabled the study to detect consensus on what defines expectations and how these differ from observed standards. An understanding of this disparity could be essential information for existing builders, new entrants into the home maintenance sector and inform housing regeneration professionals and agencies involved in the architecture and management of schemes for small‐scale builders.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Joseph Kangwa, Femi Olubodun and Margaret‐Mary Nelson

This study undertakes to examine the perceived barriers to effective management of live city‐centre building refurbishment projects in the UK. Currently a school of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study undertakes to examine the perceived barriers to effective management of live city‐centre building refurbishment projects in the UK. Currently a school of thought posits that refurbishment projects are more unpredictable than new builds. The aim of the study is to identify how, against myriad logistical constraints of city‐centre refurbishment projects, managers endeavour to complete their projects on time.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 38 project managers responsible for large and medium‐scale city‐centre refurbishment projects in Manchester, Preston, Liverpool, Leeds, Sheffield and Nottingham were targeted as participants for the study. The projects were selected on the basis of location. Only live and active projects within a busy shopping centre of a city were targeted.

Findings

The study identified, using SPSS and non‐parametric statistical techniques, that the chance of success of planning for live city‐centre projects (LCCP) is impacted by economics, micro traffic flow, the experience of project managers, the share scale of the building form, the availability of specialist refurbishment trades, and how the project itself is linked to the feeder routes to and from the main active shopping areas (MASA). The study concludes that auxiliary skills remain critical to successful project completion; among these is the relationship between local authority agencies and the project team.

Originality/value

The study is unique as it seeks to identify which refurbishment dimensions and challenges are relevant and exclusive to live city‐centre refurbishment projects.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper sets out to detect and explore underlying causes of increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account…

Abstract

This paper sets out to detect and explore underlying causes of increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account of owner‐occupiers' experience on the standards of work they encounter with small‐scale domestic traders. Part I of the study focuses on the consensus ranking of 13 building maintenance standards or attributes that owner‐occupiers expect from builders (Xbmas) whilst part II focuses on the contrast between expectations and the actual standards that owner‐occupiers observe from builders (Obmas). The application of nonparametric statistical techniques enabled the study to discover a consensus on what defines expectations and how these differ from observed standards. The final inventory generated on standard attributes is an essential information for existing builders, new entrants in the domestic sector and can be used to inform housing regeneration professionals and agencies involved in the design and management of schemes for small‐scale builders.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable attributes that are influential to successful outcomes of home maintenance activities…

1287

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable attributes that are influential to successful outcomes of home maintenance activities. The study's approach is to identify, from the perspective of owner‐occupiers, the attributes that are influential on the successful outcomes of home maintenance activities. The study is primarily based on 186 questionnaire responses from a stratified random sample of owner‐occupiers taken from 12 local authority wards identified on the basis of a Ward Index of Multiple Deprivation. The intercorrelations among the attributes influential to the outcomes of home maintenance activities demanded the application of principal component analysis to determine the factors perceived to dictate home maintenance outcomes. This resulted in the extraction of nine significant factors, which combine to exert their influence on the quality of the maintenance activities in the owner‐occupied sector.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Femi Olubodun, Joseph Kangwa, Adebayo Oladapo and Judith Thompson

Life cycle costing (LCC) is a means of comparing design options on the basis of their whole life cost with the objective of providing value for money for the life of the…

4041

Abstract

Purpose

Life cycle costing (LCC) is a means of comparing design options on the basis of their whole life cost with the objective of providing value for money for the life of the asset. The process involves estimating all the cost elements of the particular subject and translating them into a cost at a particular point in time, the present, enabling comparison. Despite being in theory, a useful tool LCC appears to experience varied levels of usage. Varied opinions have been expressed about the level to which LCC is used but there is no doubt that private finance initiatives and public‐private partnerships procurement routes have seen an increase in the use of the technique. The paper aims to appraise levels of application within the construction industry, in particular the paper will evaluate the existence of motivators and barriers which affect the decision to undertake LCC analysis in order to identify what actions can be taken to increase usage levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review, empirical research was undertaken to collect data from construction professionals regarding their views, opinions and experiences of LCC. In total, 100 questionnaires were sent to construction and professionals in the North West of England.

Findings

The paper suggests that whilst just over 50 per cent of the sample implemented LCC the data also identified the lack of understanding of the technique and the absence of a standardised methodology as key limiting factors to wider implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations in both the data collection strategy and sample size raise the issue that the results obtained cannot necessarily be deemed to be representative of the construction industry as a whole but merely of the sample and further research is recommended.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that continued professional development for construction professionals and clients alike together with the development of standardised procedures may enhance usage levels.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Femi Olubodun

This paper sets out to develop a bridge for the existing gap in knowledge by exploring the characteristics of the tenants of some LA housing estates and how they affect…

Abstract

This paper sets out to develop a bridge for the existing gap in knowledge by exploring the characteristics of the tenants of some LA housing estates and how they affect maintenance need. Without the proper integration of information relating to property and the users of the dwelling, the phenomenon of housing maintenance need prediction will remain an intractable problem for housing managers. The paper therefore explores the hypothesis that dwellings within the same estate and having every conceivable architectural attribute in space and time in common will exhibit different maintenance need profiles as a result of differences in tenants’ characteristics.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13