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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Sharmila Pudaruth, Thanika Devi Juwaheer and Yogini Devi Seewoo

This paper aims to explore the factors influencing the purchasing patterns of eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products among female customers in Mauritius. It also…

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6106

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the factors influencing the purchasing patterns of eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products among female customers in Mauritius. It also investigates upon the relative significance of these factors in predicting the preference to buy and recommend eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products to others.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies the data reduction technique by using exploratory factor analysis on a sample of 150 female consumers and condenses a set of 35 attributes into a list of eight comprehensible factors influencing the purchasing patterns of eco-friendly and beauty care products among females in Mauritius. Multiple regression analysis was also conducted to investigate upon the importance of the eight dimensions in influencing the behavioural intentions of females to purchase eco-friendly products and their likeliness to engage in referral for eco-friendly products.

Findings

The factor analysis identified that the purchasing patterns for eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products is influenced by a combination of eight factors namely: “women lifestyles, self-image health and economic considerations”, “ethical consumerism among females”, “pharmacological essence of green cosmetics and beauty care products”, “visual appeal and physical cues in cosmetic stores”, “price-conscious decisions and effective promotion”, “belief on ethical claims in green messages”, “brand image and usage experience” and “sales representatives and social influences”. The results of the regression analysis have also suggested that the behavioural intention and referral of female customers is primarily derived from one predictor factor related to “women lifestyles, self-image, health and economic conditions”.

Practical implications

In terms of marketing strategies, cosmetic and beauty care organisations should promote greater ethical concerns among female customers through effective green advertising messages. Greater emphasis should be placed on the pharmacological essence of green advertising. Cosmetic executives should also focus on health-related benefits while marketing cosmetics and beauty care products.

Originality/value

The paper aims to fill up the significant gap in the literature on purchasing patterns for eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products among female customers. This study remains one of few research work designed to address different factors influencing the purchasing patterns for green cosmetics and beauty care products in the context of developing countries such as Mauritius. Yet, it would serve as a roadmap for cosmetics and beauty care companies to understand the factors impacting on purchasing patterns of eco-friendly cosmetics and beauty care products in similar contexts.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Dilini Edirisinghe, Alireza Nazarian, Pantea Foroudi and Andrew Lindridge

The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate how young female customers establish psychological relationships with small- to medium-scale retail stores over…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate how young female customers establish psychological relationships with small- to medium-scale retail stores over time forming purchase intentions, actual purchase patterns and repurchase behaviour. Role of various customer typologies was also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was implemented to collect and analyse data, where data was collected from 20 young female customers and ten clothing retailers using purposive sampling via semi-structured interviews. Interviews with customers were conducted in a place of their choice such as in a coffee shop, whereas data from retailers were collected in the retail stores. Both online and offline retail patronage was considered to incorporate the growing tendency towards online shopping. Results were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

This study managed to reveal a number of interesting findings on how female customers form and develop psychological relationships with clothing retailers over time that ultimately builds customer loyalty. Customer behaviour in pre-purchase, purchase and re-purchase stages can significantly vary according to their individual perceptions, whereas they have a few favourite clothing brands that they frequently shop for. Preference for online shopping was found to be minimal, most of them enjoying in store experiences. Further, word of mouth and unique designs emerged as key contributors in establishing retail brand loyalty.

Practical implications

This paper provides better insights for clothing retailers and industry practitioners in understanding how customer perceptions affect clothing purchase decisions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the retail literature by emphasizing on various elements that should be amalgamated through proper synthesis to serve customers. The research is unique as it analyses customer behaviour using a recreational activity model as opposed to marketing models to demonstrate how customers develop relationships with retail brands overtime.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Suraiya Ishak, Ahmad Raflis Che Omar, Kartini Khalid, Intan Safiena Ab. Ghafar and Mohd Yusof Hussain

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential…

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2069

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey on a sample of female consumers from four higher education institutions in the urban area of Bangi Selangor, Malaysia. From their respective institutions, 150 respondents were selected through the purposive sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire has been used to gather information from the respondents. The survey data were analyzed using descriptive, t-test and correlation analyses to accomplish the study objectives.

Findings

The study indicates that millennial Muslim cosmetic purchase behavior falls under the “Limited Decision Making” classification. The classification is due to the pattern of pro-active behaviors exhibit through the information search for details about ingredients, halal clue, countries of origin, health safety guarantee and the benefits of the cosmetic products. Young, educated female consumers adore branded cosmetic items and show willingness to accept higher prices for the branded items. Despite brand consciousness, they demonstrate a relatively high concern on the halalness of the product. Based on the correlation analysis, all variables were found to be significant and the most significant of them was brand.

Research limitations/implications

Millennial consumers are information technology savvy and have access to vast information about products. As a result, the findings reiterate that millennial consumers demonstrate different purchase behavior, which is worth exploring by future researchers. In addition, other latent antecedents such as religiosity and world view are worth including in future studies.

Practical implications

Cosmetic manufacturers and marketers must ensure that their products signal positive images to fit the expectations of young and educated Muslim consumers. Although brand conscious, such consumers demonstrate prudent behavior in terms of searching for halalan and toyyiban products.

Originality/value

This study adds value in the area of halal product marketing because of two unique focuses. First, it examines the purchase of cosmetic products, which are relatively understudied compared to halal food. Second, it considers the perspectives of educated Muslim millennials, who are expected to demonstrate more specific purchase behaviors than a generalized millennial group. Therefore, the originality of this study revolves around the consideration of these two aspects, which are relevant to contemporary business marketing discussions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Philippa Ward and Fiona Sturrock

This paper provides an exploratory examination of the purchasing patterns, selection procedures and risk‐reducing mechanisms employed by female consumers making joint…

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2622

Abstract

This paper provides an exploratory examination of the purchasing patterns, selection procedures and risk‐reducing mechanisms employed by female consumers making joint purchase decisions with their male partners within the furniture and carpet sectors of the home improvement market. It focuses on two main areas: female consumer purchase selection processes and the impact of female consumer risk reduction strategies (RRSs) on this process. These issues are explored by considering female consumer buyer behaviour in relation to joint purchase decisions regarding “high‐involvement and high‐risk” household products at three stages of the selection and purchase process: pre‐purchase, consumption and post‐purchase ‐ as defined in the services consumer behaviour model.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2018

Addie Martindale and Ellen McKinney

The purpose of this paper is to explore garment consumption decision processes of female consumers when they have the option to sew or purchase their clothing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore garment consumption decision processes of female consumers when they have the option to sew or purchase their clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research study presents a segment of the findings from a larger qualitative grounded theory study on women who choose to sew clothing for themselves (Martindale, 2017). This research analyzed the interview data pertaining to the unique sew or purchase decision-making process in which these consumers undertake as well as the related control over ready-to-wear consumption that sewing provides them.

Findings

The ability to sew resulted in a unique consumer decision-making process in regard to the clothing purchases due to the control it provided them over their ready-to-wear consumption. The women developed factors that they used to make the decision to sew or purchase. Over all the ability to sew provided them the option to sew or purchase clothing, allowing the women more control over their clothing selection specifically in regard to the garments body fit.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to English-speaking women living in the North America. The qualitative data collected are specific to this sample which cannot be generalized to all female home sewers. Research involving a larger population of women from a larger geographic area is needed.

Practical implications

The newly developed sew or purchase model provides an understanding of the control that having the option to sew or purchase provides female consumers. The findings offer apparel industry professionals a new perspective on ready-to-wear consumer dissatisfaction. The investment that is made when a garment is sewn instead of purchased has the potential to increase wardrobe sustainability as the consumer experiences more attachment to the clothing they have made. The model serves a starting point for further exploration into other craft-related consumer decision behaviors.

Originality/value

Purchasing decisions of this nature have yet to be considered in published research. Exploring these women’s decisions who operate outside of typical consumer culture and developing a model for this consumer behavior explains a phenomenon not yet addressed by existing consumer consumption research.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Yukie Ide

The paper studies the relative use of a variety of distribution channels by Japanese consumers when purchasing clothing. In this way it aims to illustrate the potential of…

Abstract

The paper studies the relative use of a variety of distribution channels by Japanese consumers when purchasing clothing. In this way it aims to illustrate the potential of various channels for the sale of a range of garment types by three groups of consumers and, therefore, provided guidance to potential entrants to the Japanese market. The study was carried out by means of a convenient sample and covered the years 1990–93. The three groups of consumers covered were female students, their mothers and their fathers. A total of 46 articles of female clothing and 32 articles of male clothing were covered in the survey. The results suggested that in the case of some garments consumers did not appear to distinguish clearly between channels of distribution as forward methods of purchase. This was particularly true of male consumers. Many items were habitually purchased, however, via only one channel — this was especially the case with women consumers. Males made very little use of mail order but much greater use of department stores and specialty stores.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Arbindra P. Rimal, Wanki Moon and Siva Balasubramanian

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the role of consumers’ perceived risks and benefits of agro‐biotechnology in shaping the purchase pattern for organic food among…

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4745

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the role of consumers’ perceived risks and benefits of agro‐biotechnology in shaping the purchase pattern for organic food among UK consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

An on‐line household survey of UK consumers was conducted using household panels maintained by the National Panel Diary (NPD) group. The data included organic food purchase pattern, perceived risks and benefits of agro‐biotechnology, and socio‐demographic information about the respondents. A regression model was used to examine the impact of consumers’ general purchase behavior, perceived risks and benefits of GM technology, and socio‐demographic on organic food purchase.

Findings

Only 4 percent of the respondents purchased organic foods all the time, while 26 percent never purchased. Perceived risks of agro‐biotechnology played a dominant role in influencing organic food purchase decisions. As the risk perception increased consumers were likely to buy organic food more often. Although premium prices of organic foods were of concern to many consumers, food safety was the most important consideration when making organic food purchase decisions. Household income positively influenced consumers’ likelihood of buying organic food. Female respondents were likely to purchase organic foods more often than their male counter parts. Older respondents were less likely to buy organic foods compared to younger respondents.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide valuable information in formulating short and long‐term marketing programs for organic producers. Following the study results, food safety concern and perceived risks of GM food products need to be the overall theme of marketing programs for organic products.

Originality/value

The study uses a large sample size in examining the relationship between perceived risks of agro‐biotechnology and organic food purchase. The results are more robust and representative.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Michel Laroche, Gad Saad, Mark Cleveland and Elizabeth Browne

Examines the underlying determinants of in‐store information search for a Christmas clothing gift, specifically focusing on gender differences. Two non‐personal (general…

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9253

Abstract

Examines the underlying determinants of in‐store information search for a Christmas clothing gift, specifically focusing on gender differences. Two non‐personal (general and specific) and one personal (sales clerk assistance) in‐store information search domains were obtained from the results of a survey of actual consumers carried out shortly after the Christmas season. Consistent with the predictions of the selectivity model, females appeared to comprehensively acquire in‐store information, whereas males appeared to heuristically limit their search to a smaller subset of in‐store information. More specifically, females scored significantly higher than males on indices of both general and specific information search. Females, compared to males, were also found to start Christmas shopping much earlier, purchase more gifts, and embark on a greater number of shopping trips. Other observed gender differences are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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