Search results

1 – 10 of over 27000
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2022

Ileana Zeler, Cristina Fuentes-Lara and Ángeles Moreno

This paper aims to explore the position of women in the communication management sector in Spain from their own experiences. The study examines female communication and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the position of women in the communication management sector in Spain from their own experiences. The study examines female communication and leadership styles, emphasising the cost of leadership in which they are leaders or led.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative methodology based on in-depth interviews with 22 women actively working in top companies and agencies: female communication directors, female employees with a female leader and female employees with a male leader. Data were analysed through thematic analysis.

Findings

Results show mixed communication and leadership styles. In addition, the high level of self-demand of female communication managers stands out, making it challenging to achieve a work-life balance and the implementation of successful role models.

Social implications

Exploring the factors of female leadership remains necessary to understand and make their situation in various industries and positions visible. It also helps remove barriers to leadership, guide organisations in addressing gender discrimination issues and develop mechanisms for the internal promotion of female professionals.

Originality/value

To the best of authors' knowledge, this is the first study exploring the leadership and communication styles of women in the Spanish Public Relations (PR) and communication management industries. It also highlights the aspects influencing the cost of leadership.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2022

Amir Khushk, Zhang Zengtian and Yang Hui

This study aims to explore how female leadership contributes to corporate innovation through a systematic literature review. The authors provide a framework based on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how female leadership contributes to corporate innovation through a systematic literature review. The authors provide a framework based on empirical studies to provide a broader perspective of corporate innovation based on female leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the most recent developments in leadership, a thorough literature study is carried out to discover the antecedents of women’s leadership and their contribution to corporate innovation, with an emphasis on literature published between 2013 and 2022. An intensive research plan was developed, and 1,120 outcomes were obtained. Finally, 35 studies met the criteria for inclusion in the study. A comprehensive and systematic approach is followed, with the goal of not just summarizing current empirical studies on the subject, but also including an aspect of analytical critique besides organizational policies.

Findings

The findings show that organizations with female chief executive officers (CEOs) are more likely to innovate. When female CEOs come on board, organizations are more likely to engage in creative activities. Research also reveals that female CEOs who head organizations are more likely to engage in new and creative business practices that are environment friendly. Moreover, developing nations are encouraged to accelerate the adoption of structural transformation initiatives that would provide women with access to information and technologies.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to literature published between 2013 and 2022.

Practical implications

It is important to select the organizational response to board female representation institutional logic to reflect the intended sort of performance. Organizational stakeholders were unfavorable to female leadership, implying that such perceptions harm women but benefit men. Prior research emphasizes distinctions in leadership effectiveness between males and females, diverting attention elsewhere from examining the reasons that generate differences among executives in organizations. For policymakers to promote more women in top positions based on female knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs), they need to understand how firms deviate from traditional standards. In addition, it is crucial to pay attention to how male and female leaders are supported by their followers.

Social implications

This research offers organizations a holistic view regarding female leadership and helps them understand their contribution in innovation.

Originality/value

In modern, dynamic and technological landscapes, female participation is one of the key aspects that corporates consider to sustain and drive growth. That is why, modern societies without women’s contribution to economic growth and innovation are deemed incomplete. The current study highlights their contribution to the economy. Literature also indicates that the presence of female leadership on boards impacts corporate innovation, as well as financial performance and contextual factors.c

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Christabel L. Rogalin

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the engineering of groups such that group success under female leadership is a likely outcome?

Design/methodology/approach

In this chapter, I draw on identity control theory (Burke & Stets, 2009; Stets & Burke, 2005) and role congruity theory (Eagly, 2003) to discuss the implications for female leaders of the discrepancy between the female gender identity and the leader identity. Next, I draw upon status characteristics theory (Berger et al., 1972) to further illustrate the negative consequences of being a female leader. Then, drawing on group processes research, I make the explicit link between the negative expectations for female leaders on group performance through the endorsement of group members. Finally, I utilize innovative research using institutionalization of female leadership to propose a possible solution for improving group performance.

Research implications

I present nine testable hypotheses ready for empirical test.

Social implications

I propose that training materials underscoring the skills that females have as leaders can subvert the development of conflictual expectations facing female leaders, thus removing the deleterious effects on group performance. That is, if group members receive training that emphasizes the competencies and skills women bring to the group’s task and to the leadership role, then group performance will not be threatened.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

Robyn Dunlop and Caren Brenda Scheepers

The purpose of this study is investigating the influence of leadership on work engagement. The definition of leadership is primarily couched in culturally masculine terms…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is investigating the influence of leadership on work engagement. The definition of leadership is primarily couched in culturally masculine terms (and known as an agentic leadership style) that disfavours women, who are often perceived as being communal leaders who are compassionate and humble. The research gap addressed is whether communal and agentic leadership styles of female leaders have positive associations with work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was undertaken by applying purposive non-probability sampling and using an online survey with screening questions to ensure the respondent reported to a senior female manager. The survey consisted of reliable and valid Likert scales: agentic and communal leadership styles were assessed using the Agency-Communion-Inventory (AC-IN) scale with 20 questions and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9) with three sub-scales: vigour, dedication and absorption. The 153 usable responses in this study were used to conduct validity and reliability tests and to apply multiple regression to test associations.

Findings

Both agentic and communal leadership have a positive impact on work engagement when exhibited by a female. Although agentic leadership had an influence on all the elements of work engagement, communal leadership had a far stronger impact.

Originality/value

Female managers with communal leadership styles need to realise that they have more influence on their employees’ emotional, physical and cognitive connections to their work than female managers with agentic leadership styles. Those with agentic leadership styles need to exhibit a communal style as well, so as to enhance the influence they have on their employees’ work engagement.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2018

Larissa von Alberti-Alhtaybat and Salwa Aazam

Female leadership is a still largely unexplored aspect of the higher education (HE) field. While it is known that barriers to entry exist, few studies have addressed female

Abstract

Purpose

Female leadership is a still largely unexplored aspect of the higher education (HE) field. While it is known that barriers to entry exist, few studies have addressed female leadership and have investigated what makes a female academic seek leadership, what their experiences are and how they perceive their positions and the associated responsibilities. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this lacuna as it provides a qualitative account of female academic leaders’ perceptions regarding their positions in the Middle East (ME) context. It also outlines their main tasks as administrative and academic leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection and analysis took place according to grounded theory principles, as outlined in this study. Participants were selected according to theoretical sampling principles, access and willingness to participate.

Findings

The findings illustrate a core concept, the female academic leadership mindset in the ME, and three emergent concepts that address the main shared perceptions, which are leadership experiences and expectations, differential treatment and work-life balance. The first discusses the different types of leadership and how female leaders experienced their positions, the second addresses the perceived differential treatment female leaders experience and the last addresses the dual pressure of work and home responsibilities that many female leaders have to deal with. Interestingly, several participants felt that fellow females were often unsupportive, which might also provide an explanation as to why women still experience obstacles.

Originality/value

This study provides in-depth exploratory accounts of female leaders in various Middle Eastern HE sectors, and gives insight into leadership-related perceptions. Furthermore, it explores the effect of the Middle Eastern cultural context on aspects of female leadership.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Hans‐Joachim Wolfram and Gisela Mohr

Meta‐analytic evidence exists that the numerical dominance of one gender group among employees can affect the behaviour of female and male leaders. The purpose of this…

1667

Abstract

Purpose

Meta‐analytic evidence exists that the numerical dominance of one gender group among employees can affect the behaviour of female and male leaders. The purpose of this paper is to hypothesis that leaders will show more transformational behaviour when they hold a minority status. Transformational behaviour might help to mitigate discrepancies between male leaders' gender and the feminine context, as well as between female leaders' gender and the masculine leadership role.

Design/methodology/approach

N1=455 team members answered questionnaires about their work satisfaction and their team leaders' transformational leadership, whilst N2=142 team leaders answered questions regarding their teams' goal fulfillment.

Findings

Female and male leaders are rated more transformational in economic sectors and working groups where they hold a minority status. The paper finds a positive interrelation between transformational leadership and followers' work satisfaction for male leaders, but not for female leaders.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should compare female and male leaders from extremely gender‐typed economic sectors and from higher levels of the organisational hierarchy. This would provide evidence whether the findings could be generalised to other samples.

Practical implications

The findings point to the potential advantage of being a high‐transformational male leader in female‐dominated contexts. Irrespective of the numerical dominance of one gender group, followers of low‐transformational female leaders are more satisfied than those of low‐transformational male leaders.

Originality/value

The paper uses sector‐level (gender‐typicality of economic sectors) as well as group‐level data (gender‐composition of working groups) to account for the numerical dominance of female and male employees.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Suwon Yim, Minyoung Kim and Yoonhee Park

The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural relationships between clan culture, perceived supervisor support, leadership competencies and subjective career…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural relationships between clan culture, perceived supervisor support, leadership competencies and subjective career success among South Korean female managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation modeling was used to analyze the sixth wave of data from the Korean Women Manager Panel (KWMP) survey by the Korean Women’s Development Institute in South Korea. The panel respondents were 1,384 female managers in tenured positions at South Korean companies.

Findings

The results showed that clan culture and perceived supervisor support directly influenced female managers’ subjective career success and indirectly affected their subjective career success through leadership competencies at the same time.

Research limitations/implications

The respondents’ self-report can be a limitation as it can result in inflated outcomes in research findings. Even though no common method bias was found using Harmans’ single-factor test, the bias might not be removed completely. The study’s limitation includes the panel data and measures from KWMP, which constrained attempts to create constructs for measuring variables more precisely.

Originality/value

There is little research on the relationships between leadership competencies and other variables of female managers. The current study expanded the research on female managers’ leadership competencies by verifying that the leadership competencies play an important role in the relationships between clan culture, perceived supervisor support and subjective career success. The findings highlight that it is essential for female managers in South Korea to have supportive environments to receive fair treatment, demonstrate leadership competence in organizations and perform challenging tasks.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Janet L. Nixdorff and Theodore H. Rosen

As of 2007, there were an estimated 10.4 million businesses in the United States that were owned and operated by women. The number of women-owned firms has continued to…

2915

Abstract

As of 2007, there were an estimated 10.4 million businesses in the United States that were owned and operated by women. The number of women-owned firms has continued to grow at around twice the rate of all firms for the past two decades (Center for Women℉s Business Research, 2008). On the other hand, women comprise only 15.4 percent of corporate officers in Fortune 500 companies (Catalyst, 2007b) and, in 2003, held only 14.8 percent of board seats in the Fortune 500 (Catalyst, 2007a).To better understand the glass ceiling faced by both female entrepreneurs and women leaders, the research on women℉s issues is examined from a number of different vantage points. Women℉s entrepreneurship and women℉s leadership research on leadership, decision-making, and gender differences was examined to discover commonalities. Then female single-sex education literature was reviewed for insights on developmental issues that might influence future women entrepreneurs and leaders. In this exploration of research, it was found that both women entrepreneurs and women leaders in the corporate environment tend toward the same leadership styles and ways of interacting with others; they also experience a lack of role models and possible lack of self-efficacy.The literature on single-sex education provides observations that young women may thrive in environments in which there are fewer male competitors, hold less stereotyped views on gender, hold higher aspirations, may have greater opportunities for training of leadership skills, and may have increased self-confidence that may be the result of exposure to successful women role models. Implications for future research are explored and suggestions are provided to meet the needs of developing women entrepreneurs.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Chin‐Chung (Joy) Chao

The present study aims at contributing to the knowledge of organizational communication and cross‐cultural leadership by examining the relationship between cultural values…

3177

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims at contributing to the knowledge of organizational communication and cross‐cultural leadership by examining the relationship between cultural values and expected female leadership styles in non‐profit organizations in Taiwan and the US.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 307 Rotarians in Taiwan and the US completed a survey meant to reveal their cultural values and expected female leadership styles. In addition, the method of semi‐structured interviews was used to raise the participants' consciousness of and critical reflections upon social practices regarding female leadership.

Findings

The research results are threefold. First, among the three major leadership styles, Rotarians in both countries expect female leaders to display transformational leadership. Second, laissez‐faire leadership style can be better explained by the variables of cultural values and country than transformational and transactional leadership styles. Finally, to successfully confront gender discrimination, female leaders need to oftentimes behave much more progressively and actively and sometimes make necessary compromises of their female qualities to overcome the barriers just like climbing over the Himalayas.

Practical implications

The research findings imply that national culture is not the only factor to account for the expected female leadership styles. Future studies of leadership concepts and styles should include more variables such as organizational culture, political system, language, and feminine or masculine characteristics. Based on the results, the so‐called “glass‐ceiling effects” have been broken bit by bit; yet, female leaders still need to “climb over the Himalayas” and pass through a tortuous, demanding, and exhausting path in order to move upward.

Originality/value

As the first study of its kind, this study has filled the gap by expanding leadership studies to cross‐cultural contexts, thus contributing to the body of human knowledge of cross‐cultural leadership in non‐profit organizations of Rotary Clubs.

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Anke Esser, Marion Kahrens, Yusra Mouzughi and Ester Eomois

The purpose of this paper is to develop a competency framework that incorporates the key leadership competencies required of female leaders working in male-dominated…

3854

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a competency framework that incorporates the key leadership competencies required of female leaders working in male-dominated industries by putting particular emphasis on the male leaders’ point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research combines a thorough literature review on important leadership competencies with ten in-depth, semi-structured interviews with male leaders from the Telecommunication and ICT industry, two typically male-dominated industries in Germany. All the interviews were transcribed and analysed through qualitative content analysis based on Mayring.

Findings

Findings revealed that success of female leaders within male dominances is shaped by not only their exceptional professional expertise but also the complex mix of behaviours on a professional and interpersonal level.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the academic debate on why only a few women reach the top of organisations in male-dominated industries by considering the perspective of male leaders. A competency model is proposed that incorporates both professional competencies and expected behaviours on a personal and interpersonal level and therefore enables leadership professionals to better understand the male leaders point of view on the complex mix of competencies expected from female leaders operating in male-dominated industries.

Originality/value

The need for more women in leadership has become a global business imperative, yet little is known about the competencies required to succeed in environments shaped by male leadership styles and the understanding that women are less capable leaders. Assessing the point of view of male leaders, who dominate these working environments, provides new and valuable insights into the complex issue of women in leadership for the academic debate and the practitioners’ point of view.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 27000