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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Shih-Chuan Chen

This study aims to explore the information-seeking behavior of female patients engaged in doctor shopping. An investigation was conducted on the following aspects: the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the information-seeking behavior of female patients engaged in doctor shopping. An investigation was conducted on the following aspects: the reasons for doctor-shopping behavior (DSB), patients’ information needs and sources, patients’ use of the obtained information and the degree of satisfaction with the information collected.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted in this study. In total, 30 female participants who lived or worked in the Taipei metropolitan area, Taiwan, were recruited.

Findings

Dissatisfaction with treatment, confirmation of illness conditions, inconvenient treatment locations and hours and dissatisfaction with doctor’s attitude were the main reasons for DSB. Family members, friends, the internet and mass media were sources of information for participants when they sought second and successive doctors. In most cases, the degree of satisfaction toward the obtained information increased after each visit to a doctor during the doctor-shopping journey. However, not all participants shared information with doctors. The participants suggested that detailed explanations provided by doctors and better communication with doctors may reduce the occurrence of doctor shopping.

Originality/value

The findings of this study help medical personnel better understand DSB. The findings revealed the significance of information to patients and indicated that the information collected during doctor shopping is beneficial for patients.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Eli Sumarliah, Safeer Ullah Khan and Ikram Ullah Khan

This paper aims to explore the effects of the Coronavirus outbreak and the subjective norm and attitude on shopper’s intentions to purchase Hijab online. It hypothesises…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of the Coronavirus outbreak and the subjective norm and attitude on shopper’s intentions to purchase Hijab online. It hypothesises the influences of the Coronavirus outbreak as situational determinants, which include the place accessibility (e.g. the shutting of physical Hijab stores) and stores environment (e.g. well-being risks in physical shops, online shopping movement and extra marketing attempts from online Hijab stores through the outbreak).

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were retrieved from 366 female Muslim shoppers, both wearing and not wearing Hijab. ADANCO 2.0.1 programming and PLS-SEM were applied in empirical investigation.

Findings

The results on direct relationships reveal that the Coronavirus outbreak situational determinants including place accessibility (ACCESS) and store environment (ENVIRO) and shopper’s attitude towards online Hijab purchase (ATTITU) are strong predictors of online Hijab purchase intention (ONLINE). At the same time, the subjective norm (SUBJEC) predicts ATTITU. The indirect mediation between SUBJEC on ONLINE was also confirmed.

Practical implications

These discoveries would help the Hijab business players, i.e. online sellers, retailers and marketers to increase their web pages’ quality and marketing efforts.

Originality/value

The research is an initial concept and empirical evidence investigating the Coronavirus outbreak’s situational influences and the effects of attitude and subjective norm on shoppers’ intentions to purchase Hijab online.

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Ruamsak Veerasoontorn and Rian Beise‐Zee

The purpose of this paper is to propose a general model that examines the contextual factors underlying the decision‐making process of international hospital outshopping.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a general model that examines the contextual factors underlying the decision‐making process of international hospital outshopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Patients who chose medical treatment abroad were selected to analyze the drivers of internationalization in medical services. A total number of 27 international patients who traveled from developed countries to receive medical treatment at the largest hospital in Thailand were interviewed and their responses assessed through narrative analysis.

Findings

The narrative analysis reveals that while high costs and the deteriorating conditions of health care in developed countries are initially driving consumers to leave their local service area and choose foreign service providers, pull factors such as innovation, organizational efficiency, emotional service quality and patient‐doctor relationships in service encounters are nurturing a real preference for choosing foreign health care providers.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory study is limited to the largest hospital in South East Asia. Future research could expand upon its findings and comparisons be made with other different foreign health care providers.

Practical implications

In order to attract foreign customers a personal service, such as medical treatment, must be based on and sustained by continuous innovation in service quality.

Originality/value

The paper is the first empirical in‐depth study that examines the factors underlying the decision‐making process of international hospital outshopping.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Muhammad Ahsan Sadiq, Balasundaram Rajeswari and Lubna Ansari

The purpose of the paper is to segment and profile the Indian shoppers in the context of organic foods in India. It proposes to use a healthy lifestyle (HL) as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to segment and profile the Indian shoppers in the context of organic foods in India. It proposes to use a healthy lifestyle (HL) as a segmenting variable and to use a factor-cluster analysis approach to achieve the same. The current study is expected to add a substantial base to the segmentation literature in marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Food stores in Indian metropolitan city Chennai are sampled, and data is collected in the form of a mall intercept survey method. In total, 441 usable structured questionnaires are filled by the respondents which are subjected to suitable statistical analysis.

Findings

Three significantly different consumer segments emerged from the given sample of respondents, which shows uniqueness concerning consumer’s, HL features, demographics and the variables of the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Research limitations/implications

Clustering method used to segment the potential shoppers of organic foods is an exploratory technique only. It cannot be treated or generalized to the population like those of inferential techniques. The researcher suggested testing the same with a larger sample size and in a different context. It is limited to urban and suburban facets of the metropolitan city in India.

Originality/value

The study will be helpful to marketers and decision makers to target the potential organic foods consumers.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Matthew Kelly, Sam-ang Seubsman, Cathy Banwell, Jane Dixon and Adrian Sleigh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the food retail transition underway in Thailand, a transitional middle-income setting, is associated with increased…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the food retail transition underway in Thailand, a transitional middle-income setting, is associated with increased consumption of processed foods high in fat, salt and energy. Such “problem foods” are important risks for avoidable cardio-vascular disease and diabetes burdens.

Design/methodology/approach

The source population were members of the nationwide Thai Cohort Study (TCS) followed since 2005 (n=87,151) for a study of the health-risk transition. For this report we used a multi-region sub-sample (n=1,516) of TCS members responding to an additional questionnaire about food environments, shopping patterns and food consumption. By using a TCS sub-sample we gained access to four years (2005-2009) of longitudinal observations on a wide array of variables related to health and wellbeing from an informative group.

Findings

Overall 85 per cent of the sample now have access to supermarkets; ten years ago the figure was 47 per cent, and when aged ten years, 5 per cent. Now half the participants regularly visit supermarkets and convenience stores, especially urban dwellers with higher incomes. Frequent shopping at supermarkets and convenience stores associated with consumption of six “problem foods” (soft drinks, snack foods, processed meats, western style bakery items, instant foods and deep fried foods). Frequent fresh market shopping was associated with increased vegetable intake. There was no association between food shopping and body mass index , diabetes or hypertension but supermarket shopping was related to hyperlipidaemia.

Research limitations/implications

Modernization of food retailing is changing Thai diets and creating diet-related health risks.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a knowledge gap on links between modernizing food retail in Asia and consumption of unhealthy foods, revealing strong linkage in transitional Thailand.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Varsha Jain, Mika Takayanagi and Edward Carl Malthouse

The purpose of this study if to investigate the effects of show windows on shopping behaviour among female consumers to provide insights that a manager can use to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study if to investigate the effects of show windows on shopping behaviour among female consumers to provide insights that a manager can use to encourage purchase behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of 20 in-depth interviews, we developed a survey, which we administered to female consumers (n = 209). The survey was based on a stimulus–organism–response framework. Each respondent was exposed to an image of a show window (images were taken from apparel departments of well-known department stores) and rated her perceptions of the window and intentions to purchase items sold in the store.

Findings

Using factor analysis, we identify five components of the show window: social, hedonic, informational, image and “feel-good” factors. The first four factors are aggregated into a “show window” metric, which is shown to influence purchase intentions; this influence is fully mediated by the feel-good factor. The image factor and the social and hedonic factors each significantly influence the feel-good factor.

Practical implications

When developing show windows, brand managers should aim to touch on all factors of the show window to make shoppers “feel good”; these positive feelings might intensify shoppers’ purchase intentions.

Originality/value

This study identifies five factors that make up consumers’ perceptions of show windows. It shows that exposure to a show window affects consumers’ purchase intentions, and that this influence is determined primarily by the extent to which consumers “feel good” about the store.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Simone Pettigrew, Katherine Mizerski and Robert Donovan

The senior market is becoming more attractive as older consumers come to comprise a greater proportion of the population and control a greater proportion of national…

Abstract

Purpose

The senior market is becoming more attractive as older consumers come to comprise a greater proportion of the population and control a greater proportion of national assets. The purpose of this study was to examine older shoppers' experiences in Australian supermarkets to identify the three issues of most concern to seniors and provide practical recommendations to managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Six focus groups yielded the three major issues which were then tested via a national telephone survey (n=505).

Findings

The major issues identified included the demeanour of supermarket employees, the functionality of shopping equipment (i.e. trolleys and baskets), and the appropriate placement of products on supermarket shelves. Respondents considered these issues to be personally relevant and important to seniors in general.

Practical implications

Supermarket managers should develop strategies to ensure staff are recruited and trained in such a fashion as to enable them to engage in satisfying interactions with older customers. Other areas requiring attention include thorough product stocking to prevent over‐reaching and the provision of well‐designed and functioning shopping aids in the form of trolleys and baskets. Further issues raised in the focus groups that are worthy of consideration by supermarket managers and other retailers are merchandise quality, adequate access to and within the store, in‐store amenities, home delivery options, seniors' discounts, and avoiding extended queuing. These service aspects appear to be of particular importance to older shoppers.

Originality/value

The findings support previous research that has highlighted the need for retailers to take seniors' needs into consideration in service provision.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

David Yoon Kin Tong, Kim Piew Lai and Xue Fa Tong

The purpose of this paper is to examine ladies' buying behaviour during shoes sales promotions in Malaysia, using the highly validated Belk's Model.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine ladies' buying behaviour during shoes sales promotions in Malaysia, using the highly validated Belk's Model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using this validated model, the main research framework consists of Social Surroundings (SS), Temporal Perspective (TP), Task Definition (TD), Physical Surrounding (PS), used as predictors for Sales Promotion Purchase (SPP). Ethnic groups are used as a moderator for this study.

Findings

The results identify few key predictors during shoes sales promotion. Ladies expressed the importance of first day sales for first buyer's advantage, and they preferred large shops with music. Moreover, due to the multi‐racial society in the country, ethnic group interaction on the model did not indicate impact of consumer differences affecting the sales promotion purchase. That is, during a specific festive season sale, all ethnic groups take full advantages of the sale.

Research limitations/implications

This implies that Belk's Model is still applicable even in multi sales promotions for a specific product – shoes. However, the study may have the slight possibility of biases due to the retrospective accounts of recalling purchase involvement in retails shop(s) during sale promotions. Nevertheless, it is assumed that these biases are minimal as there are six sales per year in the country, averaging one sale per two months.

Originality/value

This study provides an insight of ladies' purchasing behaviour and their preferred types of retail outlets, which contributes to retail owners' sales promotional strategies to attract consumers during festive seasons.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

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