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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Paul Mukucha and Felix Chari

The study sought to determine the possibility of supplier development in the form of contract farming as a determinant of supply chain resilience in fast-food outlets…

Abstract

Purpose

The study sought to determine the possibility of supplier development in the form of contract farming as a determinant of supply chain resilience in fast-food outlets. This is against the background of the restaurant having been designated as one of the industries that remained operational when the other industries were affected by the two-decade-long economic meltdown and more recently COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using questionnaires from the consenting restaurants with the most senior procurement personnel in target restaurants as the informants and analysed using analysis of moment structures (AMOS) software.

Findings

The results revealed that indeed supplier development in the form of contract farming leads to supply chain resilience as indicated by improved supply chain visibility, supply chain flexibility, and supply chain redundancy. Fast-food restaurant businesses that have not yet adopted supplier development in the form of contract farming are therefore encouraged to adopt it as a way of enhancing their resilience to traditional supply chain disruptions such as transport shortages, droughts, and more recently COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

It is to the best knowledge of these researchers, that no studies have attempted to analyse the three drivers of supply chain resilience, namely supply chain redundancy, supply chain flexibility, and supply chain visibility in a single study and link them to a single antecedent.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Felix Chari, Bethuel Sibongiseni Ngcamu and Cawe Novukela

The rising threat of tropical cyclones in Zimbabwe is of great importance in establishing the general sources of humanitarian supply chain risks and assessing their…

Abstract

Purpose

The rising threat of tropical cyclones in Zimbabwe is of great importance in establishing the general sources of humanitarian supply chain risks and assessing their negative impact on relief operations. There is a scarcity of studies that collate such evidence toward enhanced humanitarian supply chains in Southern Africa. With this in mind, this study explored scattered evidence on supply chain risks in the delivery of humanitarian aid to victims of Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe.

Design/methodology/approach

This reflective study evaluates supply chain risks associated with Cyclone Idai humanitarian relief operations through qualitative in-depth interviews with relevant actors in the field. The data were triangulated with secondary information from associated publications, blogs and newspapers to reflect the truth about the phenomena under investigation.

Findings

The results show that Cyclone Idai disaster response operations were adversely affected by social, economic and political/governmental risk factors. In the same breath, poor or inadequate infrastructure and environmental factors were also contributing factors toward the futility of humanitarian relief operations.

Practical implications

This study is significant as it endeavors to contribute toward humanitarian supply chain management, specifically in assisting humanitarian organizations with suggested strategies that would work toward making humanitarian relief supply chains more resilient. However, more research needs to be done toward optimized implementation strategies for the suggested framework.

Originality/value

It is to the best knowledge of these researchers that this is a unique study carried out to examine humanitarian supply chain risk factors in Cyclone Idai relief operations in Zimbabwe.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Takayoshi NAKATA and Koji FUJIWARA

Benchmark problem 13 of the TEAM Workshop consists of steel plates around a coil (a nonlinear magnetostatic problem). Seventeen computer codes developed by twelve groups…

Abstract

Benchmark problem 13 of the TEAM Workshop consists of steel plates around a coil (a nonlinear magnetostatic problem). Seventeen computer codes developed by twelve groups are applied, and twenty‐five solutions are compared with each other and with experimental results. In addition to the numerical calculations, two theoretical presentations are given in order to explain discrepancies between the calculations and the experiment.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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