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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Lancy Mac and Felicitas Evangelista

This study aims to gauge the interactive effect of export intensity and diversity on export performance among exporters in an emerging economy and explore the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to gauge the interactive effect of export intensity and diversity on export performance among exporters in an emerging economy and explore the moderating effect of export intermediaries on the internationalization–export performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was undertaken among a convenience sample of small and medium exporters located in Guangdong and Fujian Provinces in South China.

Findings

The results show that intensity and diversity interact negatively with export performance, whereas the use of export agents registered a positive effect. Exporters pursuing a strategy of high export intensity will achieve better performance provided that these exports are concentrated in a few countries. Using export agents can help in enhancing the intensity–performance relationship but not that for diversity–performance.

Practical implications

Chinese exporters are advised not to blindly pursue international expansion without regard to their own resources and capabilities. They should try to strike a balance between intensity and diversity and employ external agents when needed.

Originality/value

This research seeks to address the void in the literature on how export intensity and diversity should be balanced to create a positive effect on the performance of exporting ventures in an emerging economy, which is under-addressed in the literature. It is also found that employment of export intermediaries is not always good for export performance.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Farid Ahmed, Felicitas Evangelista and Daniela Spanjaard

Relationship marketing has been playing an important role in the development of marketing theory and practice. Though the concept has been extensively applied in…

Abstract

Purpose

Relationship marketing has been playing an important role in the development of marketing theory and practice. Though the concept has been extensively applied in international marketing in understanding the dynamics of exporter-importer relationships, few studies have looked at dyadic data to investigate the impact of mutuality of relational variables on the exporter-importer relationships. The objective of this study is to understand the impact of mutuality of key relational variables on exporter-importer relationship performance. A dyadic model of mutuality is proposed. The model highlights the impact of balance, level and quality of perceptual bi-directionality of relational variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using dyadic data collected from exporter-importer relationships involving Australian exporters and their Southeast Asian import partners through a cross-sectional, quantitative survey. Mutuality of relationship constructs was measured using the perceptual bi-directionality (PBD) method.

Findings

The results support the central hypothesis that mutuality of relational constructs has an impact on relationship performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to apply the perceptual bi-directionality method to measure mutuality of relational constructs in an exporter-importer setting. The study contributes to the general understanding of international business and exporter-importer relationship performance in particular.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Felicitas Evangelista, Brian Koon Low and Minh Thanh Nguyen

Despite huge investments within the modern trade arena, Vietnam remains a traditional trade retailing country. The purpose of this paper is to establish the combined…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite huge investments within the modern trade arena, Vietnam remains a traditional trade retailing country. The purpose of this paper is to establish the combined effects of motivation, store attributes and demographic factors on the predictive outcome of store format choice in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

A logistic regression model is used to determine the effect of these factors on the predictive outcome of traditional markets or supermarkets in purchasing non-food products or processed food products.

Findings

The dichotomy between what supermarkets and traditional markets have to offer is simple but effective. Utilitarian-motivated shoppers are more likely to shop at traditional markets. They emphasize the need to buy products quickly, find a good price, with less travel time and hence lower travel costs. Hedonistic shoppers are motivated by feelings of happiness; they shop to relieve stress and to keep up with trends. Significant difference in store choice also exists between older and higher income shoppers.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the sociocultural dimensions of shopping at traditional stores by exploring how such shopping relates to, and is embedded in, the formation and changes of individual identity, especially in communities outside of Ho Chi Minh City where shoppers are almost entirely dependent on traditional stores.

Practical implications

Traditional stores have the benefit of convenient location and savings in both time and travel costs. These benefits are being eroded as supermarkets and transnational retail corporations establish new stores close to the traditional stores.

Social implications

Shopping at traditional markets is part of the social culture and is embedded in individuals’ identity formation, despite increasing urbanization and shoppers’ higher incomes.

Originality/value

This study comprehensively explores the interactions between store choice and motivation, store attributes and demographic factors, taking into account contemporary and contextually relevant factors.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Nguyen Phong Nguyen, Felicitas Evangelista and Tai Anh Kieu

Drawing on equity theory, social exchange theory and goal setting theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the contingencies on the link between employees…

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2235

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on equity theory, social exchange theory and goal setting theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the contingencies on the link between employees’ budgetary participation and their work performance. Specifically, this study addresses the research questions: whether vertical information sharing and budget goal commitment mediate the relationship between employees’ budgetary participation and their work performance; and whether employees’ perceived budget fairness can strengthen the positive effects of budgetary participation on vertical information sharing and budget goal commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a sample of 556 low to middle level managers of business organizations in Vietnam. The research model and its hypotheses were tested using PLS-SEM. The standardized root mean squared residual value of the composite model was employed to assess model fit. Common method bias was also checked using the marker-variable approach.

Findings

This study has two key findings: both vertical information sharing and budget goal commitment partially mediate the positive effects of budgetary participation on work performance; and both dimensions of perceived budget fairness (distributive and procedural) elevate the positive relationships of budgetary participation – vertical information sharing and budgetary participation – budget goal commitment.

Practical implications

The findings could benefit businesses in Vietnam and similar market contexts. Specifically, top management needs to select a proper level of budgetary participation that can facilitate information sharing vertically within the organization and motivate their employees to be more committed to achieve budget goals. Besides, the top management also needs to ensure that their employees perceive the fairness in the budgeting process.

Originality/value

The study contributes a greater understanding as regards the mediating roles of vertical information sharing and budget goal commitment as well as the moderating role of perceived budget fairness on the relationship between employees’ participation in the budgetary process and their work performance, especially in the context of an emerging market – Vietnam. Overall, this study contributes to the management and accounting literature with insights concerning a more complex process explaining employees’ work performance and triggered by their budgetary participation.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Felicitas Evangelista and Lancy Mac

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relative importance of deliberate learning, learning from experience and relevant learning co-variates in pursuing market…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relative importance of deliberate learning, learning from experience and relevant learning co-variates in pursuing market learning, and to assess the impact of market learning on export performance in smaller firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model was initially developed and subsequently tested using survey data. The standard two step approach of first testing the measurement model and then estimating the structural model was adopted.

Findings

The results provide concrete evidence that among SMEs, deliberate learning has a greater impact on export market learning as compared to experience accumulation, and that market learning has a significant effect on export performance. The results also show that absorptive capacity and commitment to learning are significant co-variates of market learning.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the role of deliberate learning vis-a-vis learning by experience in achieving foreign market learning and export performance in smaller firms. It addresses a major limitation of organisational learning studies which tend to focus mainly on experiential learning and organisational learning in large organisations.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Irwin P. Levin, Gary J. Gaeth, Felicitas Evangelista, Gerald Albaum and Judy Schreiber

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing…

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906

Abstract

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing effect and the hypothesis identified by Leven et al (1998). Studies the reliability of these effects across samples of subjects in the USA and Australia. Shows that, for two of the three types, attribute framing and risky choice framing, the effects were strong and almost identical in the two samples. Highlights a significant effect for the US sample, but not the Australian sample, for the third type, goal framing. Discusses results in terms of the reliability of the effects and their potential for revealing cross‐cultural differences in values.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Patrick Poon, Felicitas Evangelista and Gerald Albaum

The purpose of this paper is to study the attitudes of Asian and Western migrants and native‐borns in Australia toward foreign‐made products and the impact of consumer…

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2913

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the attitudes of Asian and Western migrants and native‐borns in Australia toward foreign‐made products and the impact of consumer ethnocentrism on attitude formation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was designed as a personal interview survey using shopping mall intercepts. A total of 206 consumers were asked to indicate their preferences for foreign‐made versus Australian‐made products for five diverse products. Respondents also responded to a short version of the CETSCALE, a scale measuring consumer ethnocentrism. Respondents were classified as Australian‐born, Asian‐born migrants, or Western‐born migrants.

Findings

Consumer ethnocentrism is negatively related to attitudes toward foreign‐made products for both overseas‐born (Asian and Western) migrants and local‐born Australians. Asian‐born migrants reported a significantly lower level of consumer ethnocentrism than both of the other respondent groups. Within the Western migrant group, males had a significantly higher level of ethnocentrism than females; there was no significant difference between genders in the other two respondent groups. For migrants, the number of years living in Australia is positively related to ethnocentrism. Age is related to ethnocentrism for all sample groups.

Originality/value

The study contributes to knowledge about ethnic marketing to migrant groups and consumer ethnocentrism, especially for Australia, in which migrants represent a large share of its population. Thus, it could very well serve as a model of “things to come” in other countries that experience large immigration inflows. This is the first study to look at ethnocentrism and attitudes toward country‐of‐origin of products of migrants and locally‐born people.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Erik S. Rasmussan, Tage Koed Madsen and Felicitas Evangelista

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the…

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3549

Abstract

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the case studies of five Danish and Australian born global companies. Considers different global models and their limitations. Presents the findings of recent surveys in this area. Concludes that internationalization has not been the primary objective in the founding process and gives direction for further research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Aviv Shoham, Felicitas Evangelista and Gerald Albaum

This study adopts the Miles and Snow typology as a framework for analyzing export performance of manufacturing firms. The study investigates the role of distinctive…

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2522

Abstract

This study adopts the Miles and Snow typology as a framework for analyzing export performance of manufacturing firms. The study investigates the role of distinctive competence and various strategic responses of firms belonging to each strategic type on their foreign market performance. The results of this study show that a firm’s strengths and strategic responses are related and that the impact of strategic responses on export performance differs according to the firm’s strategic type. Based on these results, the strengths that defenders, prospectors and analyzers should build and maintain as well as the strategic responses that each should pursue are identified.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Felicitas Evangelista and Leonardo A.N. Dioko

This study seeks to examine the effect of two types of social influence, normative and informational, on travelers' perceptions of a destination's brand equity.

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3339

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the effect of two types of social influence, normative and informational, on travelers' perceptions of a destination's brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

A brand equity measurement model, previously developed for a tangible product brand, is applied and validated in the context of a destination brand. The structural model is then estimated to test the effects of normative and informational influence on brand equity.

Findings

Normative but not informational influence has a significant effect on brand equity perceptions.

Originality/value

The empirical results help to strengthen the claim that branding principles can be readily generalized to tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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