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Article

Mo Chen, Yiqin Wang, Shijiu Yin, Wuyang Hu and Fei Han

The organic food sold in China can bear organic labels from different countries/regions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the trust and preferences of consumers for…

Abstract

Purpose

The organic food sold in China can bear organic labels from different countries/regions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the trust and preferences of consumers for tomatoes carrying these different labels.

Design/methodology/approach

The data came from real choice experiments conducted in Shandong Province, China. A mixed logit model was used to analyze consumer willingness to pay (WTP).

Findings

Results indicated that, among the four organic labels considered in this study, the highest WTP was expressed for organic label from the European Union, followed by Hong Kong’s organic label, Japanese organic label and, lastly, by the Chinese mainland organic label. Consumer trust has a positive effect on their WTPs for the four organic labels. Providing consumers with information on organic can significantly lift their WTPs, and reduce the gaps between WTPs for different organic labels.

Originality/value

This research is of academic value and of value to food suppliers. International food marketers are recommended to equip their products with proper organic labels and initiate additional consumer education.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Yadong Luo

In the aftermath of the global economic crisis, the pursuit of new perspectives and different growth models is imperative. One of the most significant trends of our time…

Abstract

In the aftermath of the global economic crisis, the pursuit of new perspectives and different growth models is imperative. One of the most significant trends of our time is the rise of Asia in the world economy. After centuries of Western economic dominance, China, India, and the rest of the East, alongside emerging economies more broadly, are beginning to challenge the West for positions of global industry leadership and underlying managerial philosophies and perspectives. In this paper, I review some key philosophical insights from Asia that have underpinned the success of many Asian businesses for generations, hoping that it will encourage more efforts – conceptually, theoretically, and empirically – leading the discourse on fresh new perspectives on business in emerging economies in general, and on Asian management in particular.

Details

Multidisciplinary Insights from New AIB Fellows
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-038-4

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Article

Siegfried G. Karsten

The People’s Republic of China, as a progressively developing economy, is subject to dynamic structural changes, which are potentially de‐stabilizing in nature. Since the…

Abstract

The People’s Republic of China, as a progressively developing economy, is subject to dynamic structural changes, which are potentially de‐stabilizing in nature. Since the end of the 1970s China had abandoned Mao Zedong’s socioeconomic theories and policies and instituted profound socioeconomic reforms. Her more pragmatic approach has increasingly emphasized economic freedom and individualism. The pursued “pragmatism” involves a revolutionary mixture of both a planned and a market economy with greater economic but not political freedom. Essential socioeconomic reforms were not complemented by requisite political reforms. According to Walter Eucken’s “instability thesis,” this may de‐stabilize China’s socioeconomic and political structures. The challenge which China continues to face is how to reconcile two sets of conflicting principles, economic freedom and Marxist‐Leninist‐Maoist control of politics and society, resolving Eucken’s hypothesis of potential long‐term instability. This paper addresses this challenge in terms of ethical and economic perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Fumin Song, Lianyu Fu and Fei Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to present and describe a solution of aluminum substrate drilling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and describe a solution of aluminum substrate drilling.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of LED and printed circuit board with metal substrate are reviewed first. Then the challenges of drilling metal substrate, particularly the aluminum substrate, are described. To find the solution, coated micro drill bit with optimized helix angle is developed. The performance of developed micro drill bit is examined via drilling force investigation. Finally, the drilling tests are conducted to verify the solution of aluminum substrate drilling.

Findings

Coated drill bit is a very good choice to solve the problems of drilling burr and chip clogging in aluminum substrate drilling. The reason is that the drilling force can be obviously reduced by using a coated drill bit. The drill bit with medium helix angle is beneficial to prevent chip clogging. A satisfactory solution of aluminum substrate drilling can be achieved by applying coated drill bit with medium helix angle together with appropriate entry board.

Originality/value

The paper presents a satisfactory solution of aluminum substrate drilling. By employing the presented solution, the problems of drilling burr and chip clogging can be avoided in aluminum substrate drilling.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article

Cao Yang

Egoism as a moral philosophy of market economy in Adam Smith’s system is rational not ultra. It benefits not only other people but also the society led by an invisible…

Abstract

Egoism as a moral philosophy of market economy in Adam Smith’s system is rational not ultra. It benefits not only other people but also the society led by an invisible hand. The Chinese traditional culture dominated by Confucianism, which denied gain‐seeking actuated by human selfish motives, as a whole, may be incompatible with the development of a market economy. Without rational egoism, the market economy would not exist. Meanwhile, ultra‐egoism which benefits oneself at the expense of others has also deformed the market economy. If it runs wild, the market economy would take the road to its doom.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 23 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Weizhong Dai, Fei Han and David Hui

Studying hydrogen absorption/ desorption in metal-H2 reactors is important for the usage and commercialization of hydrogen energy. In this article, we present a numerical…

Abstract

Studying hydrogen absorption/ desorption in metal-H2 reactors is important for the usage and commercialization of hydrogen energy. In this article, we present a numerical method for simulating hydrogen absorption in a cylindrical LaNi5-H2 reactor. The method is obtained based on the modified heat and mass transfer model for the absorption of hydrogen, and its finite difference approximation in a staggered mesh. As a result, the numerical scheme is unconditionally stable and the solution is second-order accurate. Numerical results including gas and solid densities, gas velocity, gas and solid temperatures are obtained.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article

Fei Han and Haihong He

The purpose of this paper is to examine the cost of equity capital for foreign firms listed in the US stock exchanges during 2004‐2009, a period that the Securities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the cost of equity capital for foreign firms listed in the US stock exchanges during 2004‐2009, a period that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) shifted from requiring foreign issuers to comply with the US GAAP reconciliations to permitting the choice of IFRS in financial reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The cost of equity of foreign firms in the IFRS reporting period was compared to that in the US GAAP reconciliation period. Also, the cost of equity of foreign firms was compared to that of matched US firms during the two periods.

Findings

The results show that the cost of equity in foreign firms is higher during the IFRS reporting period (2007‐2009) than the US GAAP reconciliation period (2004‐2006); foreign firms exhibit a constantly higher cost of equity than that of matched US firms in both periods; and the size of cost of equity difference remains the same with respect to the regulatory change. Further, it is shown that the change in foreign firms' cost of equity is affected by their home country's IFRS use.

Originality/value

Bonding theory suggests a reduced cost of capital for foreign firms cross‐listed in the USA because US listings require more substantial disclosure. The paper finds evidence that the SEC's waiver of US GAAP reporting does appear to reduce the bonding benefits for cross‐listed foreign firms, particularly those from IFRS adoption countries.

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Article

Balbir S. Sihag

Sages and seers in ancient India specified dharma, artha, kama and moksha as the four ends of a moral and productive life and emphasised the attainment of a proper balance…

Abstract

Sages and seers in ancient India specified dharma, artha, kama and moksha as the four ends of a moral and productive life and emphasised the attainment of a proper balance between the spiritual health and the material health. However, most of their intellectual energy was directed towards the attainment of moksha, the salvation from birth‐death‐rebirth cycle. Kautilya, on the other hand considered poverty as a living death and concentrated on devising economic policies to achieve salvation from poverty but without compromising with ethical values unless survival of the state was threatened. Kautilya's Arthashastra is unique in emphasising the imperative of economic growth and welfare of all. According to him, if there is no dharma, there is no society. He believed that ethical values pave the way to heaven as well as to prosperity on the earth, that is, have an intrinsic value as well as an instrumental value. He referred the reader to the Vedas and Philosophy for learning moral theory, which sheds light on the distinction between good and bad and moral and immoral actions. He extended the conceptual framework to deal with conflict of interest situations arising from the emerging capitalism. He dedicated his work to Om (symbol of spirituality, God) and Brihaspati and Sukra (political thinkers) implying, perhaps, that his goal was to integrate ethics and economics. It is argued that the level of integration between economics and ethics is significantly higher in Kautilya's Arthashastra than that in Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations or for that matter in the writings of Plato and Aristotle.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article

Anton Kriz

China has become an economic powerhouse in historic terms but there are a number of challenges to its continued prosperity. The aim of this paper is to more fully…

Abstract

Purpose

China has become an economic powerhouse in historic terms but there are a number of challenges to its continued prosperity. The aim of this paper is to more fully understand China's propensity for creative innovation, which is seen as an important next stage in its continued development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual but uses historical and secondary data to support its assumptions. The paper was written in conjunction with the 1st Global Peter F. Drucker Forum (celebrating 100 years since his birth) and attempts to continue his challenge of “the hard work of thinking”.

Findings

China has a long history of successful innovation. However, Confucian belief, a single despot and a closing off to the rest of the world have thwarted its innovative edge. The key to rekindling the entrepreneurial spirit is seen largely as an internal battle based on the state's ability to balance the institution of government with the needs of a burgeoning prospective creative class. This paper identifies that much of this change will rely on quality‐related developments rather than simply investments of financial capital.

Originality/value

The ability to create new things is a challenge to developing economies that rely on low cost and imitation. China's success in innovation will have substantial implications for developed nations both economically and geo‐politically. China wants to be a significant player on a global scale and this paper sheds light on its potential to achieve such an objective. Through traversing China's innovative landscape, this paper also enlightens the field of management on key aspects of China's innovative past, present and future.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Paul Herbig and Alain Genestre

Identifies and analyses the magnitude of cultural factors determining the motivation and implication of the workforce in the corporate strategy. Establishes a general…

Abstract

Identifies and analyses the magnitude of cultural factors determining the motivation and implication of the workforce in the corporate strategy. Establishes a general hierarchy of human needs shaping organizational cultures and individual behaviours in the work setting.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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