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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Gregory Berry and Kareem M. Shabana

Traditional feasibility analysis is focused on the immediate and urgent needs of a new venture start-up. All four parts of the feasibility analysis (product/service…

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Abstract

Purpose

Traditional feasibility analysis is focused on the immediate and urgent needs of a new venture start-up. All four parts of the feasibility analysis (product/service, industry/market, organizational, and financial) are valuable and essential, but what is missed is a part that provided attention to the longer-term requirements for success and sustainability. A fifth strategic feasibility analysis is needed, focused on the long-term sustainability of the new venture. This strategic/contingent context-dependency lens considers the organization's long-term survival, confirming that organizational success depends on the new venture's ability to emphasize its uniqueness and fit with its external environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes advantage of the decades-long literature review in Strategy to combine known data with entrepreneurial practice in undertaking the feasibility analysis.

Findings

This enhanced feasibility analysis adds a strategic lens beyond the traditional four-part feasibility analysis, resulting in identifiable value-added benefits and awareness of potential opportunities or threats in the longer term.

Research limitations/implications

This research is conceptual and theoretical at this point, without field implementation.

Practical implications

New venture failure is an ongoing concern for many. This suggested strategic lens, especially the sustainability aspect (beyond the “what-do-we-need-to-do-to-open-the-doors” of much feasibility analysis) may prove very useful. Competitive advantage is examined in the traditional feasibility analysis, but this strategic lens suggests a longer term examination, and engages with competitor response.

Social implications

If adopted, this enhanced analysis may lead to greater success for new venture start-ups, thus less wasted time, energy and money.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt at adding a focused strategic lens to the traditional entrepreneurial feasibility analysis. This may seem like a simple and elementary shift of perspective, but the implications are huge, and take advantage of the decades-long research stream in strategic thinking and planning.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Gregory R. Berry

This article explores the value of feasibility analysis for the pre-launch nonprofit enterprise. Similarities and differences between for-profit entrepreneurial ventures…

2185

Abstract

This article explores the value of feasibility analysis for the pre-launch nonprofit enterprise. Similarities and differences between for-profit entrepreneurial ventures and nonprofit entrepreneurial ventures are outlined, and then the traditional format of feasibility analysis used by the entrepreneurial for-profit start-up is reviewed and analyzed. This four-stage analysis is then adapted to the needs of the nonprofit new venture enterprise. The benefits of doing a feasibility analysis for the nonprofit enterprise start-up are identified, and guidelines are suggested. An underpopulated research stream is identified and explained in this article for the start-up and early developmental phases of the nonprofit enterprise.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Emil Malizia

Applies, modifies and extends the basic taxonomy ProfessorGraaskamp developed for feasibility studies to present a framework forunderstanding how market analysis and…

Abstract

Applies, modifies and extends the basic taxonomy Professor Graaskamp developed for feasibility studies to present a framework for understanding how market analysis and feasibility research are carried out. Situations are modified and the relevant actors and feasibility problems applicable to each situation are identified and discussed. Finally makes explicit the role of the developer in the context of the development process and the nature of feasibility analysis that is the most appropriate for developers as clients.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Marie Ingrid Herman and Minh Thi Thai

Over the last decade, value chain for development has shown its bias towards global value chain approaches. This article proposes a holistic framework to carry out…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last decade, value chain for development has shown its bias towards global value chain approaches. This article proposes a holistic framework to carry out feasibility analysis for the establishment of a value chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was used to collect and analyse data from a wide range of stakeholders potentially involved in establishment of a global cut-foliage value chain based on wild harvesting of ornamental ferns in New Caledonia.

Findings

Multiple feasibility analyses revealed issues that need to be addressed, priorities for different stakeholders and possible ways forward in the establishment of a value chain.

Research limitations/implications

The framework supports businesses, entrepreneurs, investors, donors and governments in proceeding with value chain establishment with significant consideration of social, economic and environmental drivers for sustainability.

Originality/value

Relevant concepts in several fields are integrated into a single framework that can guide feasibility analysis of value chain establishment.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

David G. Carmichael and Maria C.A. Balatbat

The paper looks at the influence of adding more projects on overall investment feasibility under conditions of uncertainty, and how far into the future the project cash…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper looks at the influence of adding more projects on overall investment feasibility under conditions of uncertainty, and how far into the future the project cash flows should be relied upon, given that the project owner expects a reasonable level of feasibility attached to the investment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a formulation for the feasibility of the multi‐project case under uncertainty. A second order moment analysis method is adopted. Existing theory is extended to take into account the presence of multiple projects with a requirement imposed on feasibility by the project owner. In tandem with the theoretical development, example case study numerical results are presented.

Findings

With a conventional deterministic discounted cash flow analysis, the feasibility calculations change little in going from one to many projects. However with uncertainty attached, the feasibility calculations need to be reworked and become more complex, the issue of feasibility becomes less transparent on going from one to many projects, distinct feasibility transition points disappear, and feasibility is found to vary over the projects' time horizons.

Practical implications

The need for the analysis given in this paper resulted from an actual investment decision. The paper formulation provides interesting insight into feasibility calculations, and will be of use to practitioners engaged in front‐end project investment risk work.

Originality/value

The paper provides original commentary on the feasibility of multiple projects and the time‐variant nature of feasibility.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2021

George Papageorgiou and Alexander N. Ness

Many good sustainability entrepreneurial ideas and projects fail to reach their objectives due to problems with feasibility. This chapter investigates the effectiveness of…

Abstract

Many good sustainability entrepreneurial ideas and projects fail to reach their objectives due to problems with feasibility. This chapter investigates the effectiveness of methods used to evaluate the feasibility of entrepreneurial ventures in the context of sustainable urban development. Traditional methods and tools based on cost–benefit analysis could provide some guidance for entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs when evaluating sustainability strategies. Yet, such methods rely on restrictive assumptions, which cast doubt on their suitability for real-world sustainability applications. Traditional methods are far from really enabling entrepreneurs to make informed optimal decisions. New integrated methods are necessary for drawing conclusions vis-a-vis the practicality of entrepreneurial ideas by quantifying and analyzing the benefits and costs of all options in a given scenario. This chapter evaluates the effectiveness of current feasibility study methods and their suitability for sustainable urban planning and development. It surmises that caution is advised concerning their reflection of real-life applications, given the complexity and dynamicity of solving sustainability-related problems. It is shown that such methods can arguably be a useful tool when evaluating the viability of investing in innovation and sustainability if they are enriched with advanced modelling techniques, such as system dynamics and optimization methods. For this purpose, an entrepreneurial venture for promoting sustainable mobility via information and communication technology (ICT) is used as a case study. The proposed integrated ‘Sustainability Entrepreneurship’ approach for evaluating feasibility can prove to be very useful for entrepreneurs when assessing the efficacy of complex sustainable-related ventures.

Details

Entrepreneurship, Institutional Framework and Support Mechanisms in the EU
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-982-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Preliminary Feasibility for Public Research and Development Projects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-267-7

Abstract

Details

Preliminary Feasibility for Public Research and Development Projects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-267-7

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Matthew Moorhead, Lynne Armitage and Martin Skitmore

The purpose is to examine the risk management processes and methods used in determining project feasibility in the early stages of the property development process by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to examine the risk management processes and methods used in determining project feasibility in the early stages of the property development process by Australia/New Zealand property developers, including Monte Carlo simulation, Bayesian models and real option theory embedded in long-term property development and investment decision-making as instruments for providing flexibility and managing risk, uncertainty and change.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey of 225 Australian and New Zealand trader developers, development managers, investors, valuers, fund managers and government/charities/other relating to Australia/New Zealand property development companies' decision-making processes in the early stages of the development process prior to site acquisition or project commencement – the methods used and confidence in their organisations' ability to both identify and manage the risks involved.

Findings

Few of the organisations sampled use sophisticated methods; those organisations that are more likely to use such methods for conducting risk analysis include development organisations that undertake large projects, use more risk analysis methods and have more layers in their project approval process. Decision-makers have a high level of confidence in their organisation's ability to both identify and manage the risks involved, although this is not mirrored in their actual risk management processes. Although the majority of property developers have a risk management plan, less than half have implemented it, and a third need improvement.

Practical implications

Property development organisations should incorporate more modern and sophisticated models of risk analysis to determine the uncertainty of, and risk in, a change of input variables in their financial viability appraisals. Practical application includes using such multiple techniques as what-if scenarios and probability analysis into feasibility processes and utilise these specific techniques in the pre-acquisition stages of the property development process and, specifically, in the site acquisition process to support decision-making, including a live risk register and catalogue of risks, including identification of and plans for mitigation of project risks, as a form of risk management.

Originality/value

First study to examine the extent of the decision-making methods used by property developers in the pre-acquisition stage of the development process.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Preliminary Feasibility for Public Research and Development Projects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-267-7

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