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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Anushree Tandon, Amandeep Dhir, Intesar Almugren, Ghada Naif AlNemer and Matti Mäntymäki

Research examining the “fear of missing out” (FoMO) is increasingly prominent, with a growing number of studies exploring this phenomenon. Despite the increased academic…

Abstract

Purpose

Research examining the “fear of missing out” (FoMO) is increasingly prominent, with a growing number of studies exploring this phenomenon. Despite the increased academic interest, no attempts have been made to synthesize extant knowledge on FoMO. There is limited holistic understanding of its conceptualization and operationalization. To address this gap, an exhaustive systematic literature review (SLR) on FoMO is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic review protocols and content analysis was used to analyze and synthesize insights from 58 empirical studies obtained from four academic databases: Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed and PsycINFO.

Findings

Significant diversity in prior research on FoMO was encapsulated in four themes. There are significant limitations in conceptualization of FoMO, along with narrow focus on geographic, methodological and contextual foci of prior studies. The authors propose a comprehensive framework and extensive gap-specific research directions to aid future research.

Research limitations/implications

The SLR is limited in its consideration of empirical studies published in academic journal articles obtained from four databases.

Social implications

The authors imply the critical need to ascertain motives for individuals' excessive engagement with social media and the subsequent impact on well-being indicators (e.g. sleep quality) and functional impairments (e.g. addiction).

Originality/value

This study magnifies and expands the intellectual boundaries of FoMO and suggests the adoption of a multidisciplinary perspective for further investigation. The use of novel theoretical lenses can further ascertain FoMO's effect on different cultures and social media users.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Laura Frances Bright and Kelty Logan

Social media usage has become ubiquitous in our society – consumers are spending upwards of 20 percent of their media time on social sites interacting with friends, family…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media usage has become ubiquitous in our society – consumers are spending upwards of 20 percent of their media time on social sites interacting with friends, family and brands (Adler, 2016) and all of this usage is driving fatigue. The purpose of this paper is to examine how advertising factors such as attitude and intrusiveness impact social media fatigue as well as two consumer behavior factors, fear of missing out (FOMO) and privacy.

Design/methodology/approach

A 190-item questionnaire was developed and administered to an opt-in subject pool recruited for web-based research (i.e. online panel). A representative sample of 750 US social media users was recruited for the survey of which 518 respondents were valid and usable.

Findings

Results indicate that FOMO has the greatest impact on social media fatigue, not advertising factors as predicted. In addition, privacy concerns continue to plague consumers and should be monitored by advertisers.

Research limitations/implications

With regard to limitation, the survey contained a variety of self-reported measures that can tend to be under-reported, especially when it comes to social media usage as evidenced in a recent study (Adler, 2016).

Originality/value

This research undertook an investigation of consumer perceptions of social media advertising and how those relate to social media fatigue and psychological factors such as privacy and FOMO. In looking at these constructs, a clearer picture of how consumer perceptions of advertising impact levels of social media fatigue has emerged. In addition, the results provide a better understanding of FOMO, a psychological factor that significantly contributes to social media fatigue.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2021

Vartika Pundir, Elangbam Binodini Devi and Vishnu Nath

This study aims to examine the collective impact of awareness and knowledge about fake news, attitudes toward news verification, perceived behavioral control, subjective…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the collective impact of awareness and knowledge about fake news, attitudes toward news verification, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, fear of missing out (FoMO) and sadism on social media users’ intention to verify news before sharing on social media.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study’s conceptual framework is developed by a comprehensive literature review on social networking and the theory of planned behavior. The data for samples were collected from 400 respondents in India to test the conceptual framework using the partial least square–structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The results show that awareness and knowledge, perceived behavioral control, attitudes toward news verification and FoMO are significant predictors of intention to verify news before sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The present study concludes implications for managers of social media companies and policy actors that want to take steps toward arresting the spread of fake news via social media.

Originality/value

Academic investigation on fake news sharing on social media has recently gained traction. The current work is unique because it uses the theory of planned behavior as a basis for predicting social media user’s intention to verify news before sharing on social media.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Aqdas Malik, Amandeep Dhir, Puneet Kaur and Aditya Johri

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate if different measures related to online psychosocial well-being and online behavior correlate with social media fatigue.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue, the stressor-strain-outcome (SSO) framework is applied. The study consists of two cross-sectional surveys that were organized with young-adult students. Study A was conducted with 1,398 WhatsApp users (aged 19 to 27 years), while Study B was organized with 472 WhatsApp users (aged 18 to 23 years).

Findings

Intensity of social media use was the strongest predictor of social media fatigue. Online social comparison and self-disclosure were also significant predictors of social media fatigue. The findings also suggest that social media fatigue further contributes to a decrease in academic performance.

Originality/value

This study builds upon the limited yet growing body of literature on a theme highly relevant for scholars, practitioners as well as social media users. The current study focuses on examining different causes of social media fatigue induced through the use of a highly popular mobile instant messaging app, WhatsApp. The SSO framework is applied to explore and establish empirical links between stressors and social media fatigue.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Heather J. Parker and Stephen Flowerday

Social media has created a new level of interconnected communication. However, the use of online platforms brings about various ways in which a user’s personal data can be…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media has created a new level of interconnected communication. However, the use of online platforms brings about various ways in which a user’s personal data can be put at risk. This study aims to investigate what drives the disclosure of personal information online and whether an increase in awareness of the value of personal information motivates users to safeguard their information.

Design/methodology/approach

Fourteen university students participated in a mixed-methods experiment, where responses to Likert-type scale items were combined with responses to interview questions to provide insight into the cost–benefit analysis users conduct when disclosing information online.

Findings

Overall, the findings indicate that users are able to disregard their concerns due to a resigned and apathetic attitude towards privacy. Furthermore, subjective norms enhanced by fear of missing out (FOMO) further allows users to overlook potential risks to their information in order to avoid social isolation and sanction. Alternatively, an increased awareness of the personal value of information and having experienced a previous privacy violation encourage the protection of information and limited disclosure.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into privacy and information disclosure on social media in South Africa. To the knowledge of the researchers, this is the first study to include a combination of the theory of planned behaviour and the privacy calculus model, together with the antecedent factors of personal valuation of information, trust in the social media provider, FOMO.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Meenakshi Handa and Parul Ahuja

Although there are many benefits that technological progress offers, there is also a dark side to several innovations. This study aims to examine smartphone usage amongst…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there are many benefits that technological progress offers, there is also a dark side to several innovations. This study aims to examine smartphone usage amongst young Indian adults and identify likely antecedents and consequences of addictive smartphone usage behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data, through an online structured questionnaire, was collected from 240 smartphone users. The survey was conducted among college students between 18-25 years of age. Structural equation modelling was used to test the proposed research framework.

Findings

The results show that almost 25 per cent of respondents had high scores on the smartphone addiction scale. The respondents spend most of their time on applications such as WhatsApp and other social networking sites. The findings indicate fear of missing out to be a predictor of problematic smartphone usage behaviour. Further, the study points to poorer quality of sleep as a consequence of high smartphone usage.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the findings of the study, the importance of digital detoxification has been highlighted. Further, recommendations have been made to discourage excessive smartphone usage and avoid the resulting negative consequences.

Originality/value

With the increasing usage of smartphones, there is a need to study addictive behaviour amongst sections of the population, specially those which tend to be more vulnerable. The study examines the extent of smartphone addictive behaviour amongst young Indian adults and identifies antecedents and consequences of such behaviour.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Sven Laumer and Christian Maier

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to…

Abstract

Social media usage, especially social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube, and LinkedIn provide lots of benefits to their users, including fun, information from significant others, and a distraction from real-life problems. In parallel, the authors see that there are also negative consequences, such as stress when using SNS. In 2012, research started to talk about SNS-use stress as a specific form of technostress. Since that early study, 62 articles have been published in peer-reviewed outlets that explain why SNS-users perceive stress. Our literature review uses the transactional model of stress to integrate these articles to propose a transactional model of SNS-use stress. The model indicates social and technical SNS-stressors that trigger psychological, physiological, and behavioural reactions, named SNS-strains. Our findings suggest there are more social SNS-stressors than technical ones. In terms of SNS-strain, research has mainly focussed on psychological, e.g. exhaustion or dissatisfaction, and behavioural, e.g. discontinuous usage intention or distraction, SNS-strains. Based on those results, the authors identify research gaps and provide implications for research, SNS-users, SNS-providers, organisations, and parents. With that, the authors aim to provide a conceptual summary of the past and, simultaneously, a starting point for further research.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Hemant Sashittal and Avan Jassawalla

The purpose of this paper is to report a three-study effort that aimed to explicate the brand entification construct, a post-anthropomorphic attribution that results from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a three-study effort that aimed to explicate the brand entification construct, a post-anthropomorphic attribution that results from user-brand interaction on Twitter. Entified brands are not merely humanlike, they are viewed as human celebrities with an elevated social status.

Design/methodology/approach

A testable conceptual framework, hypotheses and measurement scales for explicating the brand entification construct are derived from focus groups. The framework is tested using two separate surveys; the first surveyed college going, Millennial users of Twitter, the second surveyed a nationwide sample of Twitter using Millennials.

Findings

The fear of being ignored (FOBI) emerges as the key antecedent of brand entification. Elevation in healthy narcissism emerges as its key consequence. Twitter users experiencing elevated narcissism are found to defend entified brands when they receive negative tweets from other users.

Research limitations/implications

All constructs and measurement scales reported in the data are new, the evidence of linkages between the antecedents and consequences of brand entification are similarly unprecedented; both reflect the theoretical contributions of the study. Further testing of scales, and replication of results using multiple samples of Twitter users are essential before formalized theory and widely generalizable findings emerge.

Practical implications

Shaping Twitter-users’ sense of healthy narcissism emerges as the key challenge for managers aiming to build brands via Twitter communication. Stimulating users’ FOBI emerges as a key entry-way in this process.

Originality/value

The paper reports the first empirical investigation of the brand entification construct in the context of Twitter-using Millennials.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Trine Syvertsen

Abstract

Details

Digital Detox: The Politics of Disconnecting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-342-5

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Dave Stangis and Katherine Valvoda Smith

Abstract

Details

The Executive’s Guide to 21st Century Corporate Citizenship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-677-2

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