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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions, and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 458 Australian psychologists using anonymous questionnaires. Psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms, and more positive emotional well‐being. Interestingly, perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance were unrelated to hours and extra‐hours worked and job involvement.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Fay Oberklaid

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business…

Abstract

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business school graduates. Four blocks of predictors were examined using hierarchical regression analyses: personal demographics; work situation characteristics; workaholism antecedents (personal beliefs and fears, workplace values supporting work‐personal life imbalance); and workaholism components. Data were collected using anonymous self‐report questionnaires. Findings replicated previous work; both workaholism antecedents and workaholism components generally accounted for significant increments in variance on the validating job behaviors controlling for personal demographics and work situation characteristics.

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Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Zena Burgess, Ronald J. Burke and Fay Oberklaid

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by…

Abstract

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by Spence and Robbins and examines gender differences in three workaholism components, workaholic job behaviors and work and well‐being outcomes among Australian psychologists. Findings − Females and males were found to differ on many personal and situational demographic characters, two of three workaholism components (work involvement, and feeling driven to work) males scoring higher. Females, however, reported higher levels of particular workaholic job behaviors (e.g. perfectionism, job stress) likely to be associated with lower levels of satisfaction and well‐being. Females and males scored similarly on work outcomes, family satisfaction, physical health and emotional health. Females indicated more psychosomatic symptoms and less community satisfaction but more friends satisfaction. Originality/value − Aids in the understanding of workaholism in organizations.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared…

Abstract

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared based on measures developed by Spence and Robbins. Data were collected using self‐report questionnaires completed anonymously. Antecedents included personal and work situation characteristics, a measure of personal beliefs and fears and a measure of organizational values supporting work‐personal life imbalance. Consequences included measures of validating job behaviors, work outcomes, psychological health and extra‐work satisfactions. The three workaholism types differed in personal beliefs and fears, work addicts (WAs) scoring higher than work enthusiasts (WEs). WAs indicated less job and career satisfaction than both WEs and enthusiastic addicts (EAs) and lower future career prospects than did EAs. WAs also reported lower emotional health than did WEs. The workaholism types were similar on extra work satisfactions. Each workaholism type also worked similar hours per week as well. These findings validate previous conclusions indicating similar findings for both men and women.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ronald J. Burke

Posits that work‐family issues have received research attention during the last two decades. Discusses work‐family conflict stating this usually involves lack of job and…

Abstract

Posits that work‐family issues have received research attention during the last two decades. Discusses work‐family conflict stating this usually involves lack of job and family satisfaction, with more inner‐family conflicts. States a number of companies have shown promise on the work‐family challenge.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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