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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Fawzy Soliman and Keri Spooner

The successful implementation of new technologies is dependent on many factors including the efficient management of human resources. Furthermore, recent research…

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26479

Abstract

The successful implementation of new technologies is dependent on many factors including the efficient management of human resources. Furthermore, recent research indicates that intellectual assets and resources can be utilised much more efficiently and effectively if organisations apply knowledge management techniques for leveraging their human resources and enhancing their personnel management. The human resources departments are well positioned to ensure the success of knowledge management programs, which are directed at capturing, using and re‐using employees’ knowledge. Through human resources management a culture that encourages the free flow of knowledge for meeting organisational goals can be created. The strategic role of the human resources department in identifying strategic and knowledge gaps using knowledge mapping is discussed in this paper. In addition, the drivers and implementation strategies for knowledge management programs are proposed.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Fawzy Soliman

Generic performance measures have emerged as appropriate tools for assessing the performance of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP). These measures provide…

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2032

Abstract

Generic performance measures have emerged as appropriate tools for assessing the performance of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP). These measures provide information for staffing decisions and budgetary development in the food manufacturing industry. They are also used to configure variations for costing, pricing, packaging and other functions. The HACCP performance measures have become powerful tools in the management of modern food manufacturers, in particular the dairy industry. The majority of decisions and rules used for assessing the performance of the HACCP method are too complex to capture in the form of a traditional programming language. Conventional information systems automate simple and rigid bookkeeping functions but knowledge management tools automate complex decision making and processes requiring judgement, and therefore are appropriate for automating the people‐based knowledge of the HACCP performance assessment method. A new technique is presented to automate the HACCP performance assessment method using knowledge processing.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Jeffrey A. Clark and Fawzy Soliman

Suggests that businesses need a method specifically designed to assess the value of knowledge‐based system (KBS) investments. Explains the inadequacies of current…

Abstract

Suggests that businesses need a method specifically designed to assess the value of knowledge‐based system (KBS) investments. Explains the inadequacies of current valuation methods when they are applied to KBS investment decisions. Proposes a graphical valuation method which adapts the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to overcome these inadequacies and help business executives make informed KBS investment decisions. Presents an example of the method’s application to a KBS at a large multinational sales and manufacturing company.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 12 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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The Learning Organization, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Jeffrey Clark and Fawzy Soliman

This paper presents a method designed to measure the value of Knowledge Based Systems (KBSs) to the employees involved in their development, implementation and use at an…

Abstract

This paper presents a method designed to measure the value of Knowledge Based Systems (KBSs) to the employees involved in their development, implementation and use at an organisation. The method is based upon the scoring approach to valuation. The major advantage of using this approach stems from the fact that many KBSs are typified by numerous intangible benefits and costs. Traditional cost benefit models are unable to account for the contribution of intangible benefits to the value of an evolving KBS project. The method presented here overcomes this difficulty by using managers, users, and experts involved in a KBS project to measure its perceived value from both tangible and intangible sources. It produces an overall measure of value which is separated into three critical categories ‐ time, finances, and quality. Time and finances are tangible, while quality is intangible. These categories are meaningful to decision makers at all organisational levels and are critical in making an informed investment decision. The paper applies the method to two KBS projects from a large manufacturing and sales organisation. Suggestions are made for practical uses to which the method can be applied.

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Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Fawzy Soliman and Mohamed Youssef

The role of quality of information in decision making has been highlighted in the literature. However, little attention has been given to the importance of critical…

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2751

Abstract

The role of quality of information in decision making has been highlighted in the literature. However, little attention has been given to the importance of critical information for the management of modern organisations. In order to provide products and services to customers, organisations need information for making decisions. Knowledge‐based systems are emerging as appropriate technology to automate complex decision making and processes, in particular for managing enterprise operations. Critical information plays a key and essential role for managing modern organisations. Because of the large volumes of information and the resources required to process them, it has become necessary to develop a scheme for the identification of critical information. In this paper a new technique to identify critical information for use in knowledge processing is presented. Using an example from the manufacturing industry, it can be demonstrated that the use of critical information will result in more efficient management of the enterprise knowledge. This would ultimately increase the competitiveness and viability of the enterprise.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 103 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Fawzy Soliman, Stewart Clegg and Tarek Tantoush

Current advances in information technology and, in particular, computer‐aided design/computer‐aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and enterprise resources planning (ERP…

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4276

Abstract

Current advances in information technology and, in particular, computer‐aided design/computer‐aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and enterprise resources planning (ERP) systems, have led organisations to undertake significant investments in these systems. Next generation manufacturers require both systems to maintain or gain a competitive advantage, reduce risks and improve productivity and viability. In addition, recent attention to the implementation of CAD/CAM systems highlights their important role in automating complex design and next generation manufacturing processes. In the next millennium more manufacturers are likely to implement CAD/CAM and ERP systems and hence issues in the integration of CAD/CAM with ERP systems must become a major concern. Accordingly, this paper will: explore the problems of integration of CAD/CAM systems with ERP systems; study how the severity of these problems relates to CAD/CAM integration success; propose a set of critical success factors (CSF) for the integration of CAD/CAM with ERP systems; suggest hypotheses to study the relevance of these CSF for successful integration of CAD/CAM with ERP systems. In addition, the paper also demonstrates the importance of successful integration of CAD/CAM systems with other applications for next generation manufacturers. These findings suggest that integration of CAD/CAM systems with ERP systems is complex, involving many factors.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Fawzy Soliman and Mohamed A. Youssef

While the importance of SAP software in business applications and in process redesigning may have received attention recently, its effects on fostering process thinking…

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5717

Abstract

While the importance of SAP software in business applications and in process redesigning may have received attention recently, its effects on fostering process thinking have not been fully recognised. For example, SAP technology has facilitated a process‐oriented approach to system development because an SAP database can be shared by several functions in different functional units participating in the same business process. The SAP system has been built around business processes that cross functional units. In addition SAP technologies provide opportunities for improving collaboration among personnel from different functional units in their efforts to accomplish a common business process. The analysis reveals that while both computing and communication technology generate an undercurrent of process thinking, it is important to realise that SAP is a facilitator for process improvement and re‐engineering. This paper presents an overview of the role of SAP software as an enabler in business process re‐engineering. The paper also discusses the impact of the SAP system on organisations’ information and business integration strategies.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Fawzy Soliman and Mohamed Youssef

Recent developments in information technology such as the Internet, enterprise resources planning systems and knowledge management systems necessitate the use of these…

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2882

Abstract

Recent developments in information technology such as the Internet, enterprise resources planning systems and knowledge management systems necessitate the use of these technologies in order for the next generation manufacturers to co‐evolve and survive on the new business landscape. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of these technologies on managing next generation manufacturing, (NGM), and the benefits that can be reaped by effectively utilising these technologies. We present a model on how NGM companies develop, implement and manage these technologies to support their manufacturing operations. Our model is an extension of Youssef’s agile manufacturing model. The implications of this new model are discussed in detail. Our analysis indicates that perceived benefits, as well as potential business opportunities for next generation manufacturing companies, are likely to become key drivers for the use of electronic business.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Fawzy Soliman and Mohamed A. Youssef

The current dynamic and turbulent business environment has forced companies that are competing in global markets to change their traditional methods of conducting…

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8896

Abstract

The current dynamic and turbulent business environment has forced companies that are competing in global markets to change their traditional methods of conducting business. Recent developments in Internet‐based e‐commerce offer the most exciting business opportunities in the marketplace. Organisations must re‐evaluate every aspect of their manufacturing strategy and quickly move to a working mode where the Internet‐based e‐commerce is essential for their success. As the Internet develops it is possible that e‐mail and applications‐based technologies will take over from traditional telephony as the common method of communications. Furthermore, the Internet provides an unprecedented infrastructure for moving information. The real key to making e‐commerce over the Internet a normal, everyday business activity is the convergence of the telecommunications, content/media and software industries. The business‐to‐business and business‐to‐customer segments of commerce contain both common and differing characteristics that must be understood to succeed in implementing an Internet‐based e‐commerce strategy. This study examines the benefits and drawbacks of Internet‐based e‐commerce and its possible applications for future business operations.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 103 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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