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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2024

Walid Chaouali, Mohamed Yacine Haddoud, Mohamed Mousa, Ahmed Mohamed Elbaz, Narjess Aloui and Fawzi Dekhil

This study aims to investigate the impact of perceived subtle and overt discrimination on employees’ emotional exhaustion, along with potential mitigating factors such as social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of perceived subtle and overt discrimination on employees’ emotional exhaustion, along with potential mitigating factors such as social support, organizational inclusion and religiosity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a sample of 359 Muslim employees working in US restaurants. The data are analyzed using fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Techniques.

Findings

The results reveal that high/low emotional exhaustion in tourism and hospitality sector is triggered by multiple combinations of high/low levels of subtle and overt discrimination, family and friends support and religiosity. Such findings hold important implications to both theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

By using fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis, this research stands out from studies on discrimination that use conventional statistical methods. It proposes several solutions leading to a single outcome (high/low emotional exhaustion). This new approach contributes to the advancement of theory in this context.

Practical implications

This study shows that there is no single best solution for high/low emotional exhaustion. Stated differently, multiple solutions provide several ways for firms to mitigate employees’ emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

Religious discrimination in workplaces is increasing at an alarming rate, particularly in customer facing roles, such as the tourism and hospitality industry. This is having detrimental effects on employees from minority groups, often leading to excessive levels of emotional exhaustion. Nonetheless, the extant literature has somewhat understated the consequences of this issue, creating a void that needs to be fulfilled. This study addresses this gap.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Fawzi Dekhil, Hajer Boulebech and Neji Bouslama

The purpose of this paper is to describe the effects of religiosity on attitude and personal orientation toward luxury brands and on purchase and repurchase intentions…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the effects of religiosity on attitude and personal orientation toward luxury brands and on purchase and repurchase intentions. Determining the effects of religiosity on the consumers’ behavior toward luxury has proved to be a crucial matter. As far as the authors know, academic research on this topic is almost non-existent. This is an exploratory study at the level of the direct effects of religiosity. Following a literature review, a model was constructed to represent the various interrelationships between the variables investigated in this research.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was conducted among 227 individuals having varying levels of religiosity. The authors verified, before, that those interviewed have purchased a luxury brand.

Findings

The findings show that religiosity does not hinder the consumption of luxury brands. Indeed, the authors detected a positive relationship between attitude and personal orientation toward luxury brands and the level of religiosity. The effect of religiosity on attitude and personal orientation is stronger for persons having higher incomes. Moreover, this effect is slight more marked among women.

Research limitations/implications

Just as for all other research work, it is important to identify the limitations of this study. The authors need only to acknowledge its exploratory nature for these relationships to be identified as preliminary ones and as the first elements of proof rather than as a conclusive demonstration. This research suffers from certain other limitations, especially concerning its convenience sampling and the fact that it covered only a limited geographical area, namely, the capital, Tunis, and its adjacent suburbs.

Practical implications

This research has shown that whatever the level of religiosity, its effect is stronger among persons having a high income. Therefore, Muslims, whatever their religiosity, can be a target for marketers and luxury brand.

Social implications

Islam is not against luxury brand but against ostentation.

Originality/value

It is the first research, as the authors know, that study the relationship between religiosity and consumer luxury behavior, especially among Muslims.

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fawzi Dekhil, Hajer Jridi and Hana Farhat

This research aims to analyze the effects of religiosity on the decision to participate in a boycott and the effect of a boycott on attitudes toward the boycotted brand. It also…

2500

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to analyze the effects of religiosity on the decision to participate in a boycott and the effect of a boycott on attitudes toward the boycotted brand. It also aims to measure the moderating effect of brand loyalty on the different models the authors discuss.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment involving 165 Tunisian individuals during a call for a boycott of products of the Coca-Cola Company, which supports the Israeli army against Palestine, was conducted. Data analyses were conducted via two principal stages using SPSS 20.0 and Smart PLS 2.0.

Findings

The findings show that degree of religiosity was one of the antecedents of decision to participate in a boycott, and this decision has a negative effect on the attitude toward the brand being boycotted. The paper also has been able to show that brand loyalty moderates the relation of the present model. It diminishes the effect of religiosity on boycotting.

Research limitations/implications

Among the limits of the study is the fact that the authors relied on the investigation of only one product/brand (namely, Coca-Cola). In addition, the samples subjected to inquiry by the authors were chosen for their convenience.

Practical implications

Besides, the presentation of boycotted products in stores has a negative effect on the sales of the surrounding “non-boycotted” products (Friedman, 1999a). The authors note here that marketers can derive huge benefits from the exploration of boycott, for many reasons. The company must insist on the satisfaction and trust of their consumers, which are the bases of the loyalty. They must define the marketing strategy to increase the loyalty. This will diminish the effect of religiosity on the decision to participate in the boycott.

Social implications

The results allow us to assert that the decision to participate in a boycott has a negative effect on the attitude of the consumer and on the brand to be boycotted. Investigating the moderating effect of loyalty on the relation between religiosity and the decision to participate in a boycott is very interesting.

Originality/value

This research has shown that religiosity has a positive effect on boycotting. Also, it was found that a boycott has a negative effect on attitudes toward the boycotted brand. Therefore, brand loyalty moderates negatively the effect of religiosity on the decision to participate in the boycott and moderates the effect of the boycott on brand attitude.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Fawzi Dekhil

The main objective of this research was to measure the effects on sponsor recall1 at the soccer African Nations Cup (ANC) in Tunisia in 2004. This quantitative investigation used…

Abstract

The main objective of this research was to measure the effects on sponsor recall1 at the soccer African Nations Cup (ANC) in Tunisia in 2004. This quantitative investigation used a sample of 308 people who watched the event on television and/or in the stadium. The research demonstrates that there was indeed an effect by type of audience and other variables.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Michel Desbordes

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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