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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2018

Mojtaba Yousefi, Nasim Khorshidian and Hedayat Hosseini

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of different aspects of inulin functionality in meat and poultry products.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of different aspects of inulin functionality in meat and poultry products.

Design/methodology/approach

Several studies on the physiochemical, textural and sensorial effects of inulin incorporated in meat and poultry products as fat replacer and texture modifier were reviewed.

Findings

Inulin is a plant-derived carbohydrate composed of fructose units and glucosyl moieties at the end of the chain that exhibits unique nutritional and technological benefits. Among its main healthy characteristics, it has been reported to reduce the risk of colon cancer, arteriosclerosis, osteoporosis, diabetes and obesity, to maintain low levels of triglycerides and cholesterol in serum and stimulate the immune system. As a functional food ingredient, it can be used in various foods as a fat replacer, improves water-holding capacity and emulsion stability, as well as modifying the texture and viscosity of foods. Incorporation of inulin into meat and poultry products can be beneficial in producing low-fat products with desirable texture and sensory attributes.

Originality/value

There are limited reviews regarding the application of inulin in meat and poultry products. In this review, chemical composition and physicochemical properties of inulin, its health effects and various effects of inulin incorporation into meat and poultry products including, physicochemical, textural and sensory characteristics of these products are discussed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Meena Goswami, B.D. Sharma, S.K. Mendiratta and Vikas Pathak

This study aims to evaluate the quality characteristics of low-fat functional carabeef cookies incorporated with different levels of guar gum.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the quality characteristics of low-fat functional carabeef cookies incorporated with different levels of guar gum.

Design/methodology/approach

Meat cookies were incorporated with 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 per cent guar gum powder to replace 20, 30 and 40 per cent hydrogenated vegetable fat, respectively. The formulation of low-fat carabeef cookies was maintained by addition of water.

Findings

There was a significant difference (p < 0.02) between control and treatments for all physico-chemical properties, except pH and thickness. The cooking yield increased significantly (p < 0.04) at 1.5 per cent level of guar gum. Moisture, protein and ash percentage increased significantly (p < 0.02) while there was significant (p < 0.00) reduction in fat percentage. The diameter and spread ratio of cookies decreased significantly (p < 0.03) with incorporation of guar gum. The sensory scores were not significantly affected with respect to color and appearance, flavor, texture, crispiness, aftertaste and overall acceptability at 1.5 per cent level. There was no significant difference in hardness and adhesiveness values, as well as color parameters.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment can be further carried out to evaluate complete product profile and storage stability of product under different packaging conditions.

Originality/value

Fat imparts richness and tenderness, improving flavor and mouth feel to processed meat products, but higher fat consumption may lead to various life style diseases. Reducing fat content with fat replacers in meat cookies without affecting the sensory characteristics may be a significant challenge. Guar gum powder may be an excellent option at 1.5 per cent level to replace 40 per cent of hydrogenated vegetable fat without compromising quality attributes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Manish Kumar Chatli, Neeraj Gandhi and Parminder Singh

The sensory quality and yield of mozzarella cheese deteriorate as the fat content in milk is reduced. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of sodium alginate as a fat

Abstract

Purpose

The sensory quality and yield of mozzarella cheese deteriorate as the fat content in milk is reduced. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of sodium alginate as a fat replacer in low-fat buffalo mozzarella cheese on the basis of processing and storage (4 ± 1°C) quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Five treatments of buffalo mozzarella cheese, viz., control full-fat cheese (6.0 per cent milk fat; CFFC), control low-fat cheese (<0.5 per cent milk fat) without sodium alginate (CLFC), low-fat cheese with 0.1 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-1), 0.2 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-2) and 0.3 per cent sodium alginate (LFC-3), were comparatively evaluated.

Findings

Increase in the level of sodium alginate increased the percent yield of treated low-fat cheese than CLFC. Addition of sodium alginate to low-fat cheese resulted in decrease in hardness (p = 0.023) and chewiness than CLFC. Meltability was significantly decreased (p = 0.03) in low-fat cheese than CFFC. It was recorded as 1.5 ± 0.14 cm for CFFC to 0.2 ± 0.08 cm in LFC-3. Sensory panellists awarded LFC-3 highest and lowest to LFC-1; however, treated products at all selected levels were superior to CLFC. Oxidative stability and microbial stability were improved in LFC-3 than CFFC during storage.

Practical implications

Results concluded that 0.3 per cent sodium alginate is optimum for the development of extended shelf-life functional/low-fat/low-calorie buffalo mozzarella cheese.

Originality/value

Processing interventions can be successfully used to develop low-fat/low-calorie mozzarella cheese with acceptable sensory attributes and longer storage life.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Chris Strugnell

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines thefunctions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fatsubstitutes. Summarizes the…

Abstract

Focuses on fat substitutes or replacement in foods. Outlines the functions of fats in foods and details the characteristics of ideal fat substitutes. Summarizes the implications for consumers and processors of their use.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Anita M. Chappalwar, Vikas Pathak, Meena Goswami and Arun Kumar Verma

The purpose of this study is to develop functional chicken patties with incorporation of mango peel powder as a fat replacer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop functional chicken patties with incorporation of mango peel powder as a fat replacer.

Design/methodology/approach

Low-fat chicken patties were developed by incorporating mango peel powder as fat replacer at 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0% level to replace 50% vegetable oil in the formulation. The product was evaluated for various physico-chemical properties and sensory attributes.

Findings

There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between control and treatments for all physico-chemical properties except product pH and protein content. The emulsion pH, emulsion stability, water activity, fat and cholesterol content of mango peel treated chicken patties were significantly (p < 0.01) lower, however, cooking yield, moisture content, fat retention and moisture retention values were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than control. All mineral content decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in treatments except potassium and phosphorous content. Incorporation of mango peel powder had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on textural and colour parameters. Sensory scores decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in treatments, however, the product was well acceptable up to 2% of mango peel powder incorporation.

Originality/value

Fat has an important role in comminuted meat products, its reduction results in rubbery and dry textured products and poses difficulties in terms of flavour and texture. Meat products with high-fat content may exert a great harmful effect on human health such as obesity and high blood cholesterol level. Hence, there is a need for using suitable ingredient, which is able to replace fat without affecting quality. Mango peel may be used as suitable fat replacer at 2% to replace 50% added vegetable fat without affecting quality parameters.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Maiara Fonseca Dias, Angélica Sousa Guimarães, Augusto Aloísio Benevenuto Júnior, Vanessa Riani Olmi Silva, Paulo Rogério Fontes, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza Ramos and Eduardo Mendes Ramos

To meet the consumer demand for a healthier diet, this study emphasizes the feasibility of using vegetable oil gelled emulsions in low-fat industrialized burgers with high…

Abstract

Purpose

To meet the consumer demand for a healthier diet, this study emphasizes the feasibility of using vegetable oil gelled emulsions in low-fat industrialized burgers with high contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAS). Commercial canola and olive oils have been tested as a relatively inexpensive source of PUFAS.

Design/methodology/approach

Beef burgers were reformulated by replacing (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) pork back-fat with two carrageenan gelled emulsions of vegetable oils (canola and olive oil). The technological characteristics, sensorial properties and the fatty acid profile of reformulated burgers were evaluated.

Findings

Moisture content and cooking loss increased and fat and protein contents reduced with higher replacements. Oxidative stability was not affected and replacements of up to 75% did not affect the burger's acceptance. A total fat content reduction of 40% was achieved in burgers with 100% back-fat replacement, improving its nutrient value by increasing the ω−6/ω−3 ratio and decreasing the saturated fatty acids content (in 47%) and the atherogenic (from 0.61 to 0.22) and thrombogenic (from 1.29 to 0.65) indexes. Replacing up to 75% with canola oil gelled emulsion is a promising approach in the design of healthier industrial low-fat burgers.

Originality/value

Due to the association of some diseases with the consumption of products rich in saturated fat, the industry looks for alternatives not only to reduce the fat content but also to modify the fatty acid profile in meat products. This study further confirms the possibility of using carrageenan gelled fat replacer in industrialized burgers formulated with meat and other ingredients/additives commonly used to provide economic benefit. Also, confirms the feasibility to use commercial vegetable oils with relatively cheap cost than ω−3 rich oils as the oil phase in the gelled emulsion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Robert B. Noble

A review of current developments in the United States food marketsshows that health and convenience are the two major factors influencingconsumer choice of food…

Abstract

A review of current developments in the United States food markets shows that health and convenience are the two major factors influencing consumer choice of food. Consequently, there is considerable emphasis on reducing calories, reducing fat and finding suitable fat replacers. Nevertheless, it is still absolutely crucial to recognize that taste and flavour predominate. Presents a number of examples which illustrate what is happening in the United States.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Meena Goswami, B.D. Sharma, S.K. Mendiratta, U.B. Chaudhary, Vikas Pathak and Nitin Tyagi

The purpose of this paper is to develop and to assess quality characteristics of functional carabeef cookies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and to assess quality characteristics of functional carabeef cookies.

Design/methodology/approach

Carabeef cookies were prepared with incorporation of 50 percent carabeef powder in a pre-standardized formulation and then were baked at 150-160°C for 35-40 minutes. Developed functional carabeef cookies were incorporated with 50 percent carabeef powder, 10 percent orange pulp fiber as natural fiber source, 1.5 percent guar gum as fat replacer and 20 percent of sodium caseinate as sugar replacer. Cookies were analyzed for various physical properties, proximate parameters physcio-chemical properties, instrumental textural properties, color values, sensory evaluation and complete profile estimation in terms of minerals and fatty acids analysis.

Findings

Functional carabeef cookies had 4.48 times higher protein, 6.13 times higher IDF, 5.47 times higher SDF and 4.47 times higher TDF as compared to normal refined wheat flour (RWF) cookies. Functional carabeef cookies had 34.58 percent lower fat, 19.95 percent less cholesterol and 12.5 percent lower energy content as compared to normal RWF cookies.

Social implications

Functional carabeef cookies had comparatively higher mineral content as well as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in a desirable ratio. Health-promoting functional carabeef cookies might be a magnificent option to overcome the problem of malnutrition, quite prevalent among lower socio-economical strata people specifically children and women.

Originality/value

Health-promoting functional carabeef cookies had higher nutritional content and acceptability, and thus could be commercialized to improve socio-economic status and health of consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Claire E.A. Seaman, Maggie Woods and Dionne MacKenzie

Reports a recipe modification exercise which was undertaken to determine whether an acceptable sponge cake could be produced using low‐fat spreads in place of full‐fat

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Abstract

Reports a recipe modification exercise which was undertaken to determine whether an acceptable sponge cake could be produced using low‐fat spreads in place of full‐fat margarine or butter. The textural and sensory qualities of the cakes were studied and a price analysis carried out to identify price differences between low‐fat and full‐fat spreads. Presents results which indicate that, as the fat content of cakes decreases, the sensory quality also decreases, although an acceptable product can be produced using a spread containing 65 per cent fat. Finds that low‐fat spreads are in many cases more expensive than their full‐fat equivalents. Highlights the need for further work to identify a fat replacer which can be used successfully in baking.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

John Barimah, Damian Laryea and Ugett Naa Korkoi Okine

– This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Design/methodology/approach

Date fruit pulp was sun dried, milled into powder, sieved and its proximate composition determined. Refined sugar in rock buns was replaced with date fruit powder at 0, 50, 80 and 100 per cent levels. The samples were then subjected to proximate, mineral and sensory evaluation.

Findings

Date fruit powder had 1.47 per cent crude fiber and was high in carbohydrate (82.15 per cent). Carbohydrate content of samples decreased (48.55-29.72 per cent), while crude protein (6.78-9.97 per cent), crude fat (22.74-33.66 per cent) and crude fiber (0-0.49 per cent) contents increased with an increasing substitution of date powder. Of all, 0 and 50 per cent substituted rock bun samples were the most preferred. Date powder significantly (p < 0.05) increased the potassium (0.55-1.57 per cent), calcium (0.08-1.08 per cent) and iron (0.53-0.625 per cent) contents of the samples.

Originality/value

This research assessed the potential of date fruit powder as a replacer of refined sugar in rock buns, as it remains an underutilized commodity in Ghana. Replacing 50 per cent of refined sugar improved the nutrient composition of rock buns, thereby making date fruit powder a nutritious sugar replacer which could be used in pastry products. This when adopted would diversify the utilization of date fruits while providing good nutrition to consumers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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