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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

George G. Panigyrakis and Cleopatra Veloutsou

This paper examines the brand managers’ characteristics and their role in the pharmaceutical industry. It identifies the similarities and differences of that role with the…

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2864

Abstract

This paper examines the brand managers’ characteristics and their role in the pharmaceutical industry. It identifies the similarities and differences of that role with the role of brand managers working in the fast‐moving consumer goods industry. In particular, this study investigates brand managers’ duties, by analysing their perceived involvement in activities relevant to market analysis, planning, implementation, evaluation and training and strategic and tactical decision making. The results proved that brand managers working in various sectors have a co‐ordinating role and that their involvement in the strategic decision of their brands is still limited. They also indicated a dissimilarity in the perceived job responsibilities between the two industries.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Choukri Menidjel, Abderrezzak Benhabib and Anil Bilgihan

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate both the relationships among brand satisfaction, trust and loyalty and the moderating effects of personality traits…

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3959

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical study is to investigate both the relationships among brand satisfaction, trust and loyalty and the moderating effects of personality traits, namely, consumer innovativeness, variety-seeking and relationship proneness, in the context of fast-moving consumer goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a survey of 443 consumers. Structural equation modeling, specifically partial least squares regression, was used to test the theoretical model.

Findings

The findings indicate that brand loyalty is the most affected (both directly and indirectly) by satisfaction through the mediation of brand trust in both product categories studied. Moreover, variety-seeking behavior negatively moderates the relationship between brand trust and brand loyalty for fruit juices.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in the context of fast-moving consumer goods within a limited geographical region. Future research could apply this model to different contexts and countries.

Practical implications

Companies that produce fast-moving consumer goods are advised to consider the important role of satisfaction in the generation of trust, which leads to brand loyalty.

Originality/value

This study proposes and tests a theoretical model that is more comprehensive than the models used in previous studies because it investigates the relationships among satisfaction, trust, loyalty and personality traits. It is the first attempt to examine the moderating effects of consumer innovativeness, variety-seeking and relationship proneness on the relationship between brand trust and loyalty.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

George G. Panigyrakis and Cleopatra Veloutsou

Focuses on the relations that product managers, as industrial buyers, develop with industrial service providers (advertising, promotional and marketing research agencies…

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1221

Abstract

Focuses on the relations that product managers, as industrial buyers, develop with industrial service providers (advertising, promotional and marketing research agencies, lawyers, other consultants and distribution channels) in different business sectors in Greece. Investigates how brand managers in the pharmaceutical and other fast‐moving consumer goods industries view their relationships with their various interfaces, by analysing the allocation of their working time, the level of contact, and the perceived significance and quality of relationships with their interfaces. The results indicate that there are differences in the development of relationships amongst the sectors analysed.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Robert Kozielski, Michał Dziekoński, Michał Medowski, Jacek Pogorzelski and Marcin Ostachowski

Companies spend millions on training their sales representatives. Thousands of textbooks have been published; thousands of training videos have been recorded. Hundreds of…

Abstract

Companies spend millions on training their sales representatives. Thousands of textbooks have been published; thousands of training videos have been recorded. Hundreds of good pieces of advice and tips for sales representatives have been presented along with hundreds of sales methods and techniques. Probably the largest number of indicators and measures are applied in sales and distribution. On the one hand, this is a result of the fact that sales provide revenue and profit to a company; on the other hand, the concept of management by objectives turns out to be most effective in regional sales teams with reference to sales representatives and methods of performance evaluation. As a result, a whole array of indices has been created which enable the evaluation of sales representatives’ work and make it possible to manage goods distribution in a better way.

The indices presented in this chapter are rooted in the consumer market and are applied most often to this type of market (particularly in relation to fast-moving consumer goods at the level of retail trade). Nevertheless, many of them can be used on other markets (services, means of production) and at other trade levels (wholesale).

Although the values of many indices presented herein are usually calculated by market research agencies and delivered to companies in the form of synthetic results, we have placed the emphasis on the ability to determine them independently, both in descriptive and exemplifying terms. We consider it important to understand the genesis of indices and build the ability to interpret them on that basis. What is significant is that the indices can be interpreted differently; the same index may provide a different assessment of a product’s, brand or company’s position in the market depending on the parameters taken into account. Therefore, we strive to show a certain way of thinking rather than give ready-made recipes and cite ‘proven’ principles. Sales and distribution are dynamic phenomena, and limiting them within the framework of ‘one proper’ interpretation would be an intellectual abuse.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Philip J. Kitchen

Considers the development of public relations in UK fast‐movingconsumer goods (FMCG) firms. Argues that public relations is making someinroads into the traditional…

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2885

Abstract

Considers the development of public relations in UK fast‐moving consumer goods (FMCG) firms. Argues that public relations is making some inroads into the traditional marketing promotional mix by acting either in a complementary way or in place of traditional advertising. Also considers the diversification of public relations activities at the corporate level; and the trend towards interaction and integration of the corporate and marketing public relations functions. Through in‐depth interviews with ten leading, but unnamed, UK FMCG firms, argues that public relations has been developing in emphasis and expenditure within such firms over the past decade. Undertakes an approach to describing a rationale for the growth of public relations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

David B. Grant and Ruth Banomyong

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate how product recovery management (PRM) activities affected the strategic design and implementation of a…

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3410

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively investigate how product recovery management (PRM) activities affected the strategic design and implementation of a closed‐loop supply chain for a fast‐moving consumer good.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a case study approach with in‐depth interviews and structured observation of PRM processes at the focal company.

Findings

The focal company was able to design an efficient and effective product recovery and recycle manufacturing system by standardizing high‐quality raw materials, using a modular structure for the product and maintaining control over the entire process and bypassing the temptation to use third‐party collectors and processors.

Research limitations/implications

Primary research relates to the single case study and the focal company; however, the findings may not generally apply to other fast‐moving consumer goods (FMCG).

Practical implications

The comparison of the focal company's processes to an extant product recovery model provides firms with a structured way of implementing product recovery and recycling.

Originality/value

This paper adds to our knowledge of PRM and closed‐loop supply chain design by investigating its practical application to a fast‐moving consumer good; this topic has not previously received much attention by academics and practitioners.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Arnold Schuh

The purpose of this paper is to explore how selected fast‐moving consumer goods markets in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have developed since the opening of CEE and…

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7546

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how selected fast‐moving consumer goods markets in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have developed since the opening of CEE and what market structures have emerged since then. Particular attention is paid to the role of Western multinational corporations (MNCs) as drivers of globalization in this market‐reshaping process.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on household panel data the dissemination of international brands is analyzed in four product categories and four countries of the region. In addition, the question of whether the level of economic development of countries or the product character has an impact on the penetration levels of international brand is examined.

Findings

The outcomes of this retrospective study furnish evidence for the globalization of fast‐moving consumer goods markets in CEE. Although the level of diffusion of international brands varies by product category and country, the strong influence of Western MNCs in the shaping of market structures can be documented. The findings also mirror the predominantly‐employed marketing and brand strategies of foreign MNCs in CEE, namely internationally‐integrated as well as multi‐tier brand strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The data provides only a snapshot of the situation in selected consumer goods markets in the region. In order to obtain a fuller picture of the extent of market globalization, the market share of international brands should be complemented by additional data on purchase and usage behavior.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the current discussion of the market globalization thesis.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Rose Leahy

This paper aims to explore relationship marketing and the existence of relationships in mass consumer markets from the consumers' perspective, with the focus on the fast

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11806

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore relationship marketing and the existence of relationships in mass consumer markets from the consumers' perspective, with the focus on the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten focus groups were conducted with consumers from a broad range of demographic and socio‐economic backgrounds to enable in‐depth exploration of the research issue.

Findings

The study highlights the dominant negative attitudes that exist among consumers to relationship marketing as it is operationalised in FMCG markets. It is found that from the consumers' perspective relationships do not and cannot exist in these markets and that the nature of exchange in such markets is not relationship based. Consequently, the research concludes that there is a necessity to move away from relationship rhetoric in FMCG markets, and to explore the true nature of exchange in the quest for effective marketing strategies. The research also suggests that further research on relationship marketing should focus on situations where relationships do and can exist and consequently the boundaries of relationship marketing should be limited to only these situations.

Originality/value

By offering the consumer perspective on relationships and relationship marketing this study broadens understanding of the phenomenon and makes an important contribution to the relationship marketing debate.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Abhishek Dwivedi and Robert McDonald

Brand authenticity has emerged as a strategic imperative for many firms. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of consumer perceptions of brand…

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7890

Abstract

Purpose

Brand authenticity has emerged as a strategic imperative for many firms. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the effect of consumer perceptions of brand marketing communications on brand authenticity of fast-moving consumer goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Direct and indirect pathways from brand marketing communications to brand authenticity were conceptualized. Data were collected from US energy drink consumers and analysed using structural equation modelling. Multiple marketing mix variables and context-relevant covariates have been controlled for.

Findings

Direct and indirect pathways to building brand authenticity have been observed. The total effect of brand marketing communications on brand authenticity is strong, thereby highlighting the predictor’s overall effectiveness in shaping the ultimate outcome.

Research limitations/implications

The focus on consumer-perceived authenticity as opposed to objective authenticity complements the prior literature. An integrative perspective on brand marketing communications is offered, specifying it as an antecedent of perceived brand authenticity.

Practical implications

An important implication is that investments into brand marketing communications will likely influence perceived brand authenticity. Such investments may also have favourable implications for the clarity of brand positioning. Overall, brand marketing communications are effective tools for building consumer-perceived brand authenticity.

Originality/value

A need to outline managerially controllable drivers of authenticity was addressed. How consumer perceptions of brand marketing communications influence brand authenticity via direct and indirect mechanisms was demonstrated. The existence of authenticity in fast-moving consumer goods was also demonstrated.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Rujirutana Mandhachitara and Larry Lockshin

This paper examines the Scotch whisky market in Thai department stores over a two‐year period and shows their importance to Thai retailing. The paper then finds that the…

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6215

Abstract

This paper examines the Scotch whisky market in Thai department stores over a two‐year period and shows their importance to Thai retailing. The paper then finds that the category behaves as both a fast moving consumer goods market and as a luxury market. Product movement is rapid when compared to other luxury good categories and there is some evidence of discounting. The data, derived from a sample of weekly sales through 25 department stores over two years, show differences in distribution, merchandising, and pricing strategy across different chains. The paper concludes by looking at the potential causes of profit differences across these chains.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000