Search results

1 – 10 of over 15000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Pierre Beaudoin, Mary Ann Moore and Ronald E. Goldsmith

This study investigates if femalesfashion leaders and fashion followers differ in their attitudes toward buying imported and domesticapparel products. A sample of 283…

Downloads
5329

Abstract

This study investigates if females fashion leaders and fashion followers differ in their attitudes toward buying imported and domestic apparel products. A sample of 283 female consumers between 18 and 25 years of age completed a mailed questionnaire. Repeated measures analysis of variance and t‐tests were performed to determine if differences exist between fashion followers and leaders regarding their attitudes toward buying domestic and imported apparel. Results showed that fashion followers have the same overall attitude toward buying American or imported apparel. However, fashion leaders have a more positive attitude toward buying imported apparel than buying domestic apparel. In addition, fashion followers and fashion leaders have similar attitudes toward buying American apparel, but fashion leaders have a significantly more positive attitude than followers toward buying imported apparel.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Bonnie D. Belleau and Kelly Nowlin

The domestic exotic leather industry (for the purposes of this study exotic leather was defined as ostrich, emu and American alligator) has been in existence for many…

Downloads
2410

Abstract

The domestic exotic leather industry (for the purposes of this study exotic leather was defined as ostrich, emu and American alligator) has been in existence for many years, but much of the raw leather is exported, resulting in a loss of value added for America. The purpose of this study was to explore fashion leaders’ and followers’ attitudes towards exotic leather apparel products. The theoretical framework used for this study was Sproles’ model of fashion adoption (Sproles 1979). This study was part of a larger research project which was designed to segment the market, profile consumers of exotic leather apparel products and develop promotional strategies. A questionnaire, mailed to 800 fashion professionals in eight regional fashion centres across the country, yielded a 50 per cent return rate. Results indicated that the Sproles model was effective in describing and characterising fashion leaders (adopters) and followers (Sproles 1979). Fashion leaders had a more favourable attitude towards exotic leather apparel products, had a greater purchase intention of such products, had higher cognitive motivations, and had a different shopping orientation from followers. Leaders enjoyed shopping more and were not as cost‐conscious, traditional, or conservative as followers. Understanding the differences between fashion leaders and followers will only serve to enhance and contribute to the economic development of the domestic exotic leather industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Mehmet Haluk Koksal

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour. The study examined the effect of fashion consciousness, fashion

Downloads
2567

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour. The study examined the effect of fashion consciousness, fashion knowledge, mood enhancement, decision-making confidence and brand switching as the psychological factors. It also included the influence of behavioural factors such as the information sources, attributes of purchasing fashion clothing and type of retailers on male fashion leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a structured questionnaire distributed in the main shopping districts of Beirut, Lebanon, during March 2012.

Findings

The study uncovered that fashion consciousness, fashion knowledge, confidence in decision making and mood enhancement are to be the most important psychological factors influencing male fashion leadership behaviour. The study also found that frequency of reading fashion magazines is negatively and significantly affecting fashion leadership. Male fashion leaders use colleagues and friends as the main information sources for fashion. The effect of attractiveness, brand name, store image and quality of clothing is positive and significant whilst value for money negatively and significantly influences male fashion leadership. Male fashion leaders mainly shop from specialty shops, chain stores, department stores and the internet.

Originality/value

Although there are a handful of studies which examined female fashion leadership, the male fashion leadership concept has not been extensively addressed in the literature. In an attempt to at least partially address this, the study attempts to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour in Lebanon.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Laurent Bertrandias and Ronald E. Goldsmith

To model the relationships between consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information with fashion opinion leadership and fashion opinion seeking.

Downloads
14082

Abstract

Purpose

To model the relationships between consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information with fashion opinion leadership and fashion opinion seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 201 US undergraduate students were surveyed and standard scales were used to measure consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, fashion opinion leadership, and fashion opinion seeking.

Findings

Both consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information were positively related to fashion opinion leadership. Attention to social comparison information was also positively related to fashion opinion seeking, but consumer need for uniqueness was negatively related to fashion opinion seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to US consumers and the convenience sample. Other limitations include the specific measures used, and the cross‐sectional survey method prevents one from making causal statements. The effects of other, unmeasured variables could not be assessed.

Practical implications

Apparel marketers seeking to encourage opinion leaders to promote their lines of new clothing might devise appeals emphasizing the social significance of the new products and how they bestow uniqueness on their owners. Such appeals might be more effective than those not stressing these psychological motivations. Appeals to consumers more likely to seek than to give opinions might also stress the social significance of the clothing, but appeals to uniqueness might not be effective with these consumers. Perhaps a belongingness appeal would be more effective.

Originality/value

These psychological concepts have not been studied very much in the clothing/fashion product domain. They give new insights into the psychology of clothing opinion leaders and opinion seekers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Seung-Hee Lee and Jane E. Workman

– The purpose of this study was to investigate tendency to gossip, self-monitoring and fashion leadership among young adult consumers in two cultures: US and South Korean.

Downloads
1874

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate tendency to gossip, self-monitoring and fashion leadership among young adult consumers in two cultures: US and South Korean.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted using a convenience sample of 690 (278 US; 412 Korean) university students. Data were analyzed using MANOVA, ANOVA, descriptive statistics, χ2 and Cronbach’s alpha reliability.

Findings

Compared with US participants, Korean participants scored higher on tendency to gossip and lower on self-monitoring, the two subscales of self-monitoring (ability to modify self-presentation; sensitivity to the appearance of others), and fashion innovativeness and opinion leadership. In both cultures, fashion leaders scored higher on self-monitoring and tendency to gossip than fashion followers, and high self-monitors scored higher on tendency to gossip than low self-monitors. Results of this research supported Hofstede’s (1980) theory of cultural dimensions as appropriate for examining differences among fashion consumers from different countries.

Research limitations/implications

Results cannot be generalized to other population groups or cultures. Further research should include data from participants in different countries and of different ages thereby contributing to the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that gossip, especially in collectivist cultures such as South Korea, can increase brand image and serve as a useful marketing tool. Social media is one way to initialize word-of-mouth communication about a brand.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare gossip and self-monitoring among fashion consumers in two different cultures.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

K.M. Law, Z.M. Zhang and C.S. Leung

This study examines the relationship between fashion leadership, clothing deprivation and satisfaction of Hong Kong young consumers. A survey was carried out with 309…

Downloads
1046

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between fashion leadership, clothing deprivation and satisfaction of Hong Kong young consumers. A survey was carried out with 309 university students and 228 working young people in Hong Kong. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to group various attributes into different factors related to clothing deprivation and satisfaction. Hirschman and Adcock's (1978) measure was adopted to classify subjects into various fashion groups. ANOVA followed by Scheffe's procedure was applied to detect differences in clothing deprivation and satisfaction between different fashion groups. The implications of the findings to fashion retailers are discussed.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Ronald E. Goldsmith and Ronald A. Clark

This paper aims to test hypothesized relationships of consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, status consumption, and role‐relaxed…

Downloads
8352

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test hypothesized relationships of consumer need for uniqueness, attention to social comparison information, status consumption, and role‐relaxed consumption with opinion leadership and opinion seeking for new fashionable clothing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed 598 consumers between the ages of 18 and 83 years using a self‐administered questionnaire. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that all four independent variables were related to both dependent variables.

Findings

Consumer need for uniqueness was related positively to opinion leadership, but negatively with opinion seeking for younger consumers. Attention to social comparison information was positively related more highly to opinion seeking than to opinion leadership. Status consumption had the largest overall positive association, followed by role‐relaxed consumption, which was negatively related.

Research limitations/implications

Some findings confirm earlier studies and some break new ground. The findings are limited to US consumers and the convenience sample. Other limitations include the specific measures used and the cross‐section survey method precludes making causal statements. The effects of other, unmeasured variables could be assessed.

Practical implications

Apparel marketers seeking to encourage opinion leaders to promote their lines of new clothing might devise appeals emphasizing the social significance and status of the new fashions and how they bestow uniqueness on their wearers.

Originality/value

The study not only confirms previous findings regarding consumer need for uniqueness and attention to social comparison information, but expands the description of motivating factors with status and role‐relaxed consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Arlesa Shephard, Sanjukta Pookulangara, Tammy R. Kinley and Bharath M. Josiam

Promotional media and gender have been shown to influence purchase and shopping channel choice. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the role of media…

Downloads
8144

Abstract

Purpose

Promotional media and gender have been shown to influence purchase and shopping channel choice. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the role of media influence, fashion consciousness, and fashion leadership on shopping channel choice in regard to gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered using a convenience sample of male and female students at a Southwestern University in the USA. A total of 408 surveys were used for analysis. The data were factor analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) statistical software and a structural equation model was developed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that while the media influence factor of mass media positively influences fashion consciousness for both males and females, personalized media only indicated significant influence on male fashion leaders. In addition, both male and female consumers indicated that fashion leadership influenced non-traditional over traditional retail channels.

Originality/value

This research uses social cognitive theory and the theory of symbolic interaction to better understand the impact of media and fashion on shopping behavior. This paper addresses the changing media types and how they impact behavior for both men and women.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Lauren R. Bailey and Yoo‐Kyoung Seock

The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of fashion magazine content on consumer loyalty behavior and to analyze the differences in fashion magazine content…

Downloads
10972

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of fashion magazine content on consumer loyalty behavior and to analyze the differences in fashion magazine content preference and loyalty tendency toward fashion magazines among the identified fashion consumer groups according to their level of fashion innovativeness and opinion leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was developed to collect data on the variables in the study. The data analysis consisted of exploratory factor analysis, multiple regression, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), analysis of variance (ANOVA), and descriptive statistics including means, frequencies, and percentiles.

Findings

Six fashion magazine content dimensions were identified. The results revealed that fashion magazine content was significantly related to loyalty tendency toward a fashion magazine. In addition, respondents' preference for fashion magazine content and their loyalty tendency varied according to fashion consumer group and their level of fashion innovativeness and opinion leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The study has practical implications for fashion magazine editors and marketers regarding how to incorporate fashion magazine readers' wants and needs in relation to the magazine's content, how to position their magazines for targeting different groups of shoppers, and how to allocate the features of fashion magazines in order to promote readership and loyalty toward the fashion magazine.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of fashion magazines as an information source, little research has been conducted to analyze fashion magazine content and its influence on loyalty tendency.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

P.W. Turnbull and A. Meenaghan

Declares that diffusion (a term employed to describe the process whereby an innovation or a new idea or practice spreads through a social system over time) is a summary…

Downloads
2630

Abstract

Declares that diffusion (a term employed to describe the process whereby an innovation or a new idea or practice spreads through a social system over time) is a summary term used to embrace studies which trace the process of diffusion, the process of adoption and the patterns of influence involved. Acknowledges that even allowing for low involvement of marketing research in diffusion, marketing management's interest in this area can be guided and controlled. States that information is diffused through some form of communication channel – these may be one of two types: vertical channels, which exist if ‘there is a meaningful difference in the interests, social status, demographic or economic characteristics of the communication units’; and horizontal channels, which occur where communications flows among members of groups with similar interests and characteristics – these groups may be work groups, social groups, etc. Investigates sources of information and influence – in particular the two basic ones of: impersonal sources via the mass media; and personal sources involving the opinion leader in a two‐step flow of communication. Closes by discussing the implications of the two‐step flow for marketing in depth, with recommendations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 15000