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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Riham Mohamed Talaat

Fashion clothing has always been an interesting area for scholarly research on consumer behavior. This paper seeks to gain a better understanding of the youth involvement

Abstract

Purpose

Fashion clothing has always been an interesting area for scholarly research on consumer behavior. This paper seeks to gain a better understanding of the youth involvement with fashion clothing in the Egyptian context. Accordingly, the paper considers the Egyptian consumers’ attitude toward fashion involvement by investigating how fashion consciousness and materialism serve as main antecedents of fashion clothing involvement, while also determining the impact of fashion clothing involvement on fashion clothing purchase involvement. This paper aims to test an extended and adapted theoretical model of fashion clothing involvement in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

Using non-probabilistic convenience sample, a survey method was used, and 270 valid questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The hypothesized antecedents were found to influence fashion clothing involvement among young Egyptian consumers, which in turn significantly affect its purchasing. Moreover, materialism was also found to partially meditate the relationship between fashion consciousness and fashion involvement. On the other hand, the hypothesized gender role as a moderator between all variables of the study was not supported.

Research limitations/implications

Using a wider population is one avenue future research seeking to replicate this study can pursue. Specifically, because the sample consisted of university students, generalizing the results to non-students can be restricted. Likewise, findings are mainly related to fashion clothing; hence, extending the model to include other product categories can provide more support for the results.

Practical implications

As the results confirmed that there is a partial significant positive impact of fashion consciousness on fashion clothing involvement via materialism, the paper provides practical implications for fashion marketers to achieve successful communication with fashion-conscious and materialistic young Egyptian consumers. The aim is to develop strategies that are consistent with consumers’ values and communicate appeals to their aspirational lifestyle.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited number of the published manuscripts on the fashion clothing marketing sector in Egypt. There is a void in literature related the investigation of fashion clothing involvement in the developing countries. Accordingly, this paper fills this gap by examining the fashion clothing consumption behavior of young Egyptian students in Cairo University. To the best of the author’s knowledge, it is among the first to investigate the antecedents and motives related to fashion clothing involvement and its purchases among young consumers in the Egyptian context. The paper develops a comprehensive model of fashion clothing involvement to highlight the relationships between fashion involvement and Fashion consciousness, materialism, and fashion clothing purchase-involvement. The paper also contributes to the research by exploring materialism as a mediator between fashion consciousness and fashion involvement constructs, in addition to exploring the gender role as a moderator between all constructs of the study. The study makes theoretical contribution to the body of knowledge around young Egyptian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement and purchase behavior toward luxury fashion clothes, which may be extended to other similar Arab non-Western developing countries. Moreover, it offers managerial insights for establishing effective communications with this potentially lucrative market segment.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Valter Afonso Vieira

For centuries the phenomenon of fashion behaviour has been a subject of discussion for social analysts, cultural historians, moral critics, academic theorists and business…

Abstract

Purpose

For centuries the phenomenon of fashion behaviour has been a subject of discussion for social analysts, cultural historians, moral critics, academic theorists and business entrepreneurs. These different fields suggest the relevance of the topic for marketing management, for example. In this context, some marketing models try to explain the determinants of fashion clothing involvement. However, they are incomplete. Based on this context, this paper aims to test an extended theoretical model of fashion clothing involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used was a survey, where the sample was defined as non‐probabilistic by convenience. A total of 315 respondents filled in questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that the hypothesised antecedents did not a have relationship with fashion involvement. Specifically, only age had significant impact on fashion clothing involvement. In addition, support was found for the fact that fashion clothing involvement meditates two theoretical relations: one is between age and commitment, and the other is between age and subjective knowledge.

Originality/value

The paper suggests an extended model of fashion clothing involvement, supporting the association between fashion involvement and time, between fashion involvement and commitment, and the mediator role of the fashion clothing involvement construct.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Arpita Khare, Ankita Mishra and Ceeba Parveen

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of collective self esteem, age, income, marital status, and education of Indian women in predicting their fashion

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of collective self esteem, age, income, marital status, and education of Indian women in predicting their fashion clothing involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by contacting women in their offices, colleges, and malls in five different cities of India (n=397). The self‐administered questionnaire contained items from collective self esteem and fashion clothing involvement scale.

Findings

Fashion clothing involvement of Indian women is influenced by age, importance to identity, and public esteem.

Research limitations/implications

There is a large representation of the younger consumer group in the sample. This makes the study findings relevant for targeting young population groups. Distinction has not been made in the sample according to student, working women, and housewives. Further research can be undertaken to understand if women's fashion clothing involvement varies according to their working and non‐working status.

Practical implications

The findings can prove helpful to international and national apparel manufacturers and brands in planning branding and marketing strategies to promote fashion clothing among Indian women.

Originality/value

This is the first study to understand the fashion clothing involvement of Indian women with respect to collective self esteem.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Mahfuzur Rahman, Mohamed Albaity, Che Ruhana Isa and Nurul Azma

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to concern with Malaysian consumer involvement in fashion clothing. To achieve this, materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are examined as drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Gender, race and age are explored to have better understanding of fashion clothing purchase involvement in Malaysia. Data were gathered using a Malaysian university student sample, resulting in 281 completed questionnaires.

Findings

The results support the study’s model and its hypotheses and indicate that materialism, fashion clothing involvement and religiosity are significant drivers of fashion clothing purchase involvement. Also, materialism is a significant driver of fashion clothing involvement, and fashion clothing involvement mediates the relationship between materialism and fashion clothing purchase involvement. The results also show that Malaysian youth do not possess a high level of materialistic tendencies.

Originality/value

This study offers enormous opportunities for the international apparel marketers to formulate relevant business policies and strategies.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of cosmopolitanism and consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence on Indian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of cosmopolitanism and consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence on Indian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement. Moderating effect of demographics was studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey technique through self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan cities in India.

Findings

Utilitarian, value expressive factors of normative influence and cosmopolitanism influence Indian consumers’ fashion clothing involvement. Type of city, income, and education moderated influence of normative values and cosmopolitanism on fashion clothing involvement.

Research limitations/implications

One of the major limitations of current research was that it had a large number of respondents in the age group of 18-40 years. Future research can attempt to reduce age biasness.

Practical implications

The findings can prove helpful to international apparel brands marketing luxury and fashion clothing in India. However, since conformance to social norms was important for Indians, clothing manufacturers should use reference groups, opinion leaders, and celebrities to generate awareness. A blend of global and local lifestyle should be used. International luxury brands can customize their products to combine ethnic tastes.

Originality/value

Fashion clothing market promises immense growth opportunities in India. There is limited research to examine influence cosmopolitanism on Indian consumers’ consumption behaviour. Knowledge about influence of global lifestyle, brands, mass media, and services on Indian consumers’ behaviour can help in targeting them effectively.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Aron O'Cass

For many years fashion clothing has been an area of interest in consumer research. This study examines the effect of materialism and self‐image product‐image congruency on…

Abstract

For many years fashion clothing has been an area of interest in consumer research. This study examines the effect of materialism and self‐image product‐image congruency on consumers’ involvement in fashion clothing. It also examines purchase decision involvement, subjective fashion knowledge and consumer confidence. Data were gathered via a self‐completed mail survey, resulting in 478 responses being returned. The results indicate that fashion clothing involvement is significantly effected by a consumer's degree of materialism, gender and age. Further, it was found that fashion clothing involvement influences fashion clothing knowledge. Finally, the results indicate that fashion clothing knowledge influences consumer confidence in making purchase decisions about fashion.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Seulhee Yoo, Samina Khan and Catherine Rutherford‐Black

This study investigated fashion involvement, pre‐purchase clothing satisfaction and clothing needs of petite and tall‐sized consumers. The differences between petite and…

Abstract

This study investigated fashion involvement, pre‐purchase clothing satisfaction and clothing needs of petite and tall‐sized consumers. The differences between petite and tall‐sized consumers were compared, and the relationship among the three variables was examined. Petite and tall‐sized women's shopping characteristics were identified. The data were obtained through mail survey method. The final sample consisted of 177 petite and 144 tall women. Data were statistically analysed to fulfil the purpose of the study. Descriptive statistics, such as frequency, mean and standard deviation, were utilised to define the characteristics of the sample. Analysis of variance was tested to compare beliefs about clothing attributes. T‐test and analysis of covariance were utilised to determine if there is any difference between petite and tall women in terms of fashion involvement, pre‐purchase clothing satisfaction and clothing needs. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and Pearson Partial Correlation Coefficient were utilised to test the hypotheses. The results indicated significant but relatively low relationships among fashion involvement, pre‐purchase clothing satisfaction and clothing needs. Fashion involvement and clothing needs were positively correlated, while pre‐purchase clothing satisfaction and clothing needs were negatively correlated for both petite and tall‐sized women.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Aron O'Cass and Eric Choy

The purpose of this article is to examine Chinese generation Y consumers' fashion clothing involvement effects on specific brand related consumer responses including brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine Chinese generation Y consumers' fashion clothing involvement effects on specific brand related consumer responses including brand status, brand attitude and willingness to pay a premium for a specific brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐completion questionnaire survey was administered in China to university students aged between 18 and 25.

Findings

A consumer's level of involvement was found to have positive effect on brand related responses such as perception of brand status and brand attitude. Further brand status and brand attitude were found to have positive impacts on consumer's willingness to pay a premium for a specific brand.

Research limitations/implications

First, based on the student sample used for study it may not be possible to generalize the effects found to non‐students. Second, the findings from this study focusing on fashion clothing brands are perhaps limited in their generalisability to other product categories.

Practical implications

An important finding that is beneficial to marketing practitioners in China, especially for those in the fashion industry, is the findings that maintaining the status of a brand would be more effective with highly involved consumers leading to an overall more positive attitude. Marketing initiatives with status building objectives are therefore essential for enabling brands to command higher prices.

Originality/value

This paper expands understanding of consumer behaviour related to Chinese generation Y consumer behaviour, fashion clothing involvement and status branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Gargi Bhaduri and Nancy Stanforth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of product description cues as a way to differentiate luxury products for the absolute luxury consumer and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of product description cues as a way to differentiate luxury products for the absolute luxury consumer and the effect of individual traits such as need for uniqueness, product involvement, and product knowledge on consumers’ perceptions of expected price.

Design/methodology/approach

An adult sample of 253 female US consumers were recruited for an online survey.

Findings

Consumers’ need for uniqueness was related to their level of clothing involvement, which in turn was related to clothing knowledge. Fashion clothing involvement was positively related to participants’ product knowledge which in turn positively influenced participants’ perceived change in expected price of products in response to various product descriptors or cues related to absolute luxury products. In addition, younger consumers were found to be more involved in fashion clothing than older consumers.

Originality/value

This study extends the research into the luxury market and identifies elements of the marketing mix which might be manipulated to better inform potential customers about the luxury product. The study further emphasizes that product descriptors or cues can have an impact on price judgments, especially for highly involved and knowledgeable consumers. This is especially important to academicians as well as marketers since high fashion involved consumers have often been seen as drivers, influential, and legitimists of the fashion adoption process.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Gargi Bhaduri and Nancy Stanforth

This paper aims to understand whether product descriptor cues related to artisanal qualities can help marketers to delineate their clothing product offerings to consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand whether product descriptor cues related to artisanal qualities can help marketers to delineate their clothing product offerings to consumers by influencing consumers’ perceived product values and the effect (if any) of consumers’ fashion clothing involvement on such value perceptions. In today’s intensely competitive market environment marked by minimal product differentiation, marketers are often using the terms artisan, handcrafted or similar to indicate that their products are different, produced with care, are of higher quality and even premium.

Design/methodology/approach

For the study, a 2 (Involvement: High/Low) × 4 (Cues: Control/Artisan-made/Part of a curated collection/Handcrafted) × 2 (products replications: Jeans/Handbags) mixed model repeated measures experiment was designed. A sample of 487 adult female US consumers was recruited using a market-based research firm.

Findings

Results indicated that framing luxury products as artisanal using product descriptor cues influenced the perceived value of these products. Moreover, consumers’ fashion involvement positively influenced their perceived value for artisanal luxury products.

Originality/value

The study is one of the few attempts in understanding the value of artisanal luxury products. Given the importance of the artisanal luxury industry to the global economy, focusing on how consumers perceive the value of artisanal luxury products is important to marketers and practitioners as well as academicians. From a theoretical perspective, the study indicates fashion involvement as a predictor of consumers’ perceived value, thereby filling a gap in literature. The study used two different product categories to aid in generalizability of the results.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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