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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Hyun Hee Park

This study investigates the effect of consumers' brand attitude changes according to the fashion film type. Furthermore, it examines the psychological mechanism by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the effect of consumers' brand attitude changes according to the fashion film type. Furthermore, it examines the psychological mechanism by engagement and consumer fantasy proneness. This study is meaningful because it provides a more in-depth understanding of the use of fashion film as a means of consumer-oriented persuasion communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a 2(fashion film type: narrative vs non-narrative) × 2(consumer fantasy proneness: high vs low) mixed factorial design to test the hypotheses. ANOVA and the PROCESS macro mounted on SPSS was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

The group with high consumer fantasy proneness showed more changes in brand attitude when exposed to non-narrative than narrative fashion films, but the group with low consumer fantasy proneness showed no significant difference in brand attitude change according to the fashion film type. In addition, when consumer fantasy proneness is high, media and brand engagement for non-narrative fashion films increase sequentially, resulting in a greater change in brand attitude, whereas these psychological mechanisms do not work in groups with low consumer fantasy proneness.

Practical implications

Fashion brands should identify their respective target group when producing fashion films and choose differentiated narrative forms. In the case of pursuing a fantastic aesthetic value, the non-narrative type induces more attention and curiosity from consumers than the narrative type, which affects the feeling of a special bond or relevance with the brand.

Originality/value

This study has value in that it demonstrates the rationale for why a fashion brand needs to select a differentiated content structure according to the aesthetic value pursued when making a fashion film in branding work.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Eunju Ko, Eunyoung Kim, Charles R. Taylor, Kyung Hoon Kim and Ie Jeong Kang

To discover whether there are market segments for the fashion industry that cut across countries and respond differently to advertising messages.

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13891

Abstract

Purpose

To discover whether there are market segments for the fashion industry that cut across countries and respond differently to advertising messages.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to Korean, European, and US female consumers. Cluster analysis is used in an attempt to identify lifestyle segments that cut across cultures.

Findings

Four cross‐national market segments are identified. These segments can be labeled as follows: “information seekers,” “sensation seekers,” “utilitarian consumers,” and “conspicuous consumers.” Findings also reveal that fashion lifestyle segment had a stronger effect on the reaction to a set of three ads for a major global fashion company (one each from the French, Korean, and US editions of Vogue magazine) than did consumer nationality.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that it is viable and perhaps desirable for global marketers in the fashion industry to target cross‐national market segments as opposed to developing individual segmentation schemes for each country.

Originality/value

Relatively few studies examining the viability of cross‐national segmentation have been studies. The study provides insight on building global brand equity and suggests standardized advertising is appropriate for some fashion marketers.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Soundararaj Ajitha and V.J. Sivakumar

There is a significant growth in the consumption of new luxury fashion brands in developing price-sensitive markets like India. Not only does this growth demonstrate how…

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3058

Abstract

Purpose

There is a significant growth in the consumption of new luxury fashion brands in developing price-sensitive markets like India. Not only does this growth demonstrate how the “new” luxury brands have become a success, but is also illustrative of the perception and practice of style and status among the middle classes. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the consumer’s attitude for buying a branded product entails the need for uniqueness and self-monitoring. It also contends that gender and age moderate the consumer’s attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a self-monitored survey to collect the data from the customers of new luxury fashion retail brand stores in Chennai, India for empirical validation of the model. Data collected from 394 new luxury brands shoppers were analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

The need for uniqueness and self-monitoring had significant positive influences on social-adjustive attitude and value-expressive attitude. However, the relationship between self-monitoring and value-expressive attitude was weak when compared to other relationships. Significant differences were seen in the strengths of the relationships between gender and age.

Originality/value

New luxury is significantly different from traditional luxury. Analyses regarding age group, gender and attitude can provide unique understanding related to new luxury trends, especially in a price sensitive and emerging market like India. This would help managers in segmenting the market based on consumer demographics, and devise strategies based on their characteristics to influence their attitudes and other behavioural patterns.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Dalia Abdelrahman Farrag

This study aims to examine the factors influencing Qatari youth’s attitude toward luxury brands and intentions to purchase luxury brands. The appetite for luxury spending…

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1682

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the factors influencing Qatari youth’s attitude toward luxury brands and intentions to purchase luxury brands. The appetite for luxury spending in the Gulf region and specifically in Qatar is accelerating even with the fall in oil prices and faltering economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative research in the form of in-depth interviews and quantitative research in the form of survey were utilized in this study. Initially, eight in-depth interviews were conducted with luxury store owners and/or salespersons to identify the most important factors influencing attitude toward luxury brands. Furthermore, 330 Qatari respondents between the ages from 16 to 25 years were interviewed via a mall-interception method at two different malls with high-end/ luxury stores in Doha. Structural equation modeling using AMOS was run to analyze the hypothesized relationships between variables and test the model fit.

Findings

The findings indicated the overall fitness of the model. More specifically, the results indicated that fashion involvement, brand consciousness, social comparison and experiential needs have a significant impact on attitude toward luxury brands and consequently on their purchasing intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations. A more comprehensive framework can be proposed including more variables that may also influence the attitude of youth toward purchasing luxury, for example, brand prominence, vanity and functional value. Comparative studies across demographics (e.g. male vs female and adult vs young luxury buyers) as well as across different cultures and countries can also provide interesting insights related to luxury purchasing behavior among youth. Developing a typology for Qatari luxury consumers can also be very insightful, specifically for supporting brand owners in fine-tuning their marketing and targeting strategies. Finally, other moderating variables like influence of social media or peer influence can also be considered in future studies.

Originality/value

The study sheds light on a significantly important and emerging phenomenon; the increasing consumption of luxury in the gulf region and specifically in Qatar in an attempt to understand the main drivers to their attitude toward luxury brands in general.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Shuk‐Ching Liu and Tsan‐Ming Choi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the difference in consumer attitudes towards fashion brand extensions (FBEs) between designer labels (DLs) and mass‐market labels…

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5538

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the difference in consumer attitudes towards fashion brand extensions (FBEs) between designer labels (DLs) and mass‐market labels (MLs) in Hong Kong. The authors investigate in depth the factors that would affect consumers' evaluations towards FBEs with respect to the two target groups of fashion brands. In addition, comparisons between the attitudes of male and female consumers are also conducted.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a piece of empirical research. A consumer survey with a respondent size of 211 and an interview with a brand operations manager of an international designer label in Hong Kong are conducted.

Findings

The results reveal that consumers possess more complicated attitudes when they evaluate brand extensions of DLs. To be specific, the findings reveal that consumers' intention to evaluate the extended products in DLs is not significantly affected by the product quality perception. For MLs, the concept consistency of the extended category does not significantly influence the consumers' attitudes in terms of their evaluations of the new product. On the other hand, image projection and product quality appear to be more important in affecting female consumers than male consumers with respect to their attitudes towards DLs and MLs.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, which is relatively small, is a major limitation for this research.

Practical implications

In this paper, the authors propose some managerial insights and suggestions to fashion marketers in terms of establishing proper brand extension strategies for DLs and MLs. The interview with a local company's brand manager further provides some additional industry insights.

Originality/value

This paper explores, via a consumer survey and a company interview, how consumers in Hong Kong react to FBEs of DLs and MLs. The potential differences and similarities between the attitudes of male and female consumers are also explored.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Youssef Chetioui, Hikma Benlafqih and Hind Lebdaoui

This study examines the impact of attitudes toward fashion influencers (FIs) on brand attitude and consumer purchase intention. It also aims to identify factors affecting…

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13716

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of attitudes toward fashion influencers (FIs) on brand attitude and consumer purchase intention. It also aims to identify factors affecting consumers' attitudes toward FIs.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this goal, the authors propose a conceptual model that combines the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and theoretical outcomes of prior literature related to influencer marketing. Based on data collected from 610 Moroccan respondents, the authors empirically test the conceptual model using a partial least squares (PLS) estimation.

Findings

This study illustrates that attitudes toward FIs positively impact brand attitude and consumer purchase intention. The authors also demonstrate that perceived credibility, trust, perceived behavioral control, perceived subjective norms, perceived expertise and perceived congruence positively impact attitudes toward FIs.

Practical implications

The study findings help marketers and advertisers in the fashion industry to understand how influencer marketing contributes to consumer purchase intention. They also allow marketers to understand factors explaining attitudes toward FIs and therefore better select influencers capable of creating purchase intentions among existing and potential customers.

Originality/value

The present paper bridges a gap pertaining to antecedents and factors that impact attitudes toward FIs and consumer purchase intention. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first of its kind to investigate the impact of attitudes toward influencers on both brand attitude and purchase intention in the fashion industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Susan Auty and Richard Elliott

This study considers the importance of fashion involvement in the interpretation of brands of jeans as measured by Snyder’s revised self‐monitoring scale, which…

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12265

Abstract

This study considers the importance of fashion involvement in the interpretation of brands of jeans as measured by Snyder’s revised self‐monitoring scale, which discriminates between people who are highly motivated to respond to social cues and those who remain “true to themselves”. Over 650 people in the UK aged 14‐34 were shown either a branded or unbranded stimulus. They were asked to record their attitude to 27 pairs of bipolar adjectives using a semantic differential scale. At the same time they completed Snyder’s scale. It was found that self‐monitoring is a significant mediator of meaning with regard to unbranded, but not branded, jeans. A model of choice by elimination of the unacceptable is suggested by high self‐monitoring responses. It has implications for the amount of advertising required to support a fashion brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Sheetal Jain and Mohd Naved Khan

Demand for luxury brands is increasing at a very fast pace in emerging markets like India. But very few quantitative studies have been conducted to explore the reasons…

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2695

Abstract

Purpose

Demand for luxury brands is increasing at a very fast pace in emerging markets like India. But very few quantitative studies have been conducted to explore the reasons behind this sudden surge in demand. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of beliefs on consumer buying behavior for luxury fashion brands in the Indian context employing theory of planned behavior and to develop a comprehensive understanding regarding motivating factors behind luxury goods consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Researcher-controlled sampling techniques (judgment and snowball sampling) were employed to collect data from actual users of luxury fashion brands in New Delhi (India). Statistical tests including confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were applied for data analysis.

Findings

The findings show that all three beliefs – attitudinal belief, normative belief (NB) and control belief – were positively and significantly related to attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control (PBC). NB was found to have a positive impact on PBC as well as actual consumer purchasing behavior for luxury fashion brands.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the extant literature by bringing to light new findings that could help provide meaningful insights to the academicians and marketing practitioners.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Ji Young Lee and Kim K.P. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of four types of cause-related marketing (CRM) strategies on consumer responses to a fashion brand and to assess the…

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2110

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of four types of cause-related marketing (CRM) strategies on consumer responses to a fashion brand and to assess the relative effectiveness of each.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted with young adult consumers (n=344) and undergraduates (n=415). Using a between-subject design, each participant was randomly assigned to one of four CRM scenarios and completed a questionnaire.

Findings

Across all CRM conditions, the effect of CRM strategy on consumer responses (e.g. perceived brand distinctiveness/credibility/attractiveness, customer–brand identification, brand attitude, customer loyalty) was significant. The effect of corporate social responsibility image on perceived brand distinctiveness was strongest for cause-related event marketing, followed by cause-related experiential marketing, transaction-based CRM and sponsorship-linked marketing.

Practical implications

By providing information about the relative effectiveness of four types of CRM strategies, this research aids fashion marketers in their selection of the CRM strategy that generates the best performance. Adding an event component to their CRM activity would increase the effect of CRM strategies on consumer responses.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the extant literature on CRM by identifying types of CRM strategies, their relative effectiveness, and key variables (e.g., C–B identification) that explain the impact of CRM strategies on consumer responses.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Scott Markham and Joe Cangelosi

Examines the perceptions and preferences of fragrances by females. The sample was taken from nine cities across three continents. Of the two major fragrance concepts…

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5148

Abstract

Examines the perceptions and preferences of fragrances by females. The sample was taken from nine cities across three continents. Of the two major fragrance concepts examined, unisex fragrances have been introduced, with only about half the respondents in the nine cities (six countries) surveyed in this study being familiar with the concept. Respondents assessed the effects of ten factors on the fragrance decisions. The joint effects of ten surveyed factors show major differences between samples as stratified by area, with some consistency among the top factors, as supported by ANOVA and MANOVA analysis. Chi‐Square analysis of unisex and “same‐name” fragrances indicated significant differences in four of six variables. The ten surveyed factors were “scent, European fragrance, price, brand (purchased for self), brand (purchased as gift), mood, season, free items with purchase, container, and color.” “Scent, price, brand and mood” were the dominant variables. Significant differences existed between the respondents in the three major geographic areas, USA, Europe and Asia for seven of the ten factors, i.e. European fragrance, price, brand purchased as a gift, mood, season, container, and color.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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