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Publication date: 4 May 2018

Martina, Nurasih Shamadiyah and Riyandhi Praza

Purpose – This study aims to analyze the contribution of revenue and consumption cost of soybean farmers.Design/Methodology/Approach – Data analysis was done by…

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to analyze the contribution of revenue and consumption cost of soybean farmers.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Data analysis was done by quantitative descriptive analysis. Data were obtained in the form of numbers then the results of the obtained data were presented in the form of a systematic description. The sample in this study is the entire population of soybean farmers in Muara Batu, Aceh Utara by using census method as much as 50 farmers.

Findings – The results showed that the contribution of soybean farm revenue amounted to 6.94%, non-soybean farming amounted to 48.12%, and out farm activities amounted to 44.94%. This indicates that soybean farming activities are enough to contribute to increase the family revenue. Meanwhile, the average amount of household cost for food is 16,696,800 IDR/Year and for non-food is 8,397,500 IDR/Year. The analysis shows that although the contribution of soybean farming revenue is the lowest than the other farms’ revenue, it is very helpful to the farmers for fulfilling the needs of family consumption cost every year.

Research Limitations/Implications – The object of this research is to study all the farmers who utilize the land for soybean farming in Muara Batu. The research limitations are income contribution and consumption cost of soybean farmers.

Practical Implications – The amount of soybean production produced by farmers is much lower. However, the farmers can still increase their income if the amount of production can be increased by more intensification of soybean farming as tough as the use of superior varieties of soil processing, organic fertilizer on soil, balanced and integrated pest control, and harvesting and post-harvesting to reduce food loses.

Originality/Value – The farmers earned revenue not only from soybeans, but also from non-soybean farm and out farm. Soybean farming activities aim to increase revenues in order to meet the needs of the family that consist of food and non–food consumptions.

Details

Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Bright Owusu Asante, Jonas Osei-Adu, Kingsley Osei, Stella Ama Ennin, Beatrice Aighewi and Monica Opoku

This paper aims to investigate how awareness influences the adoption of positive selection (PS) technology among smallholder yam farmers in West Africa. PS has the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how awareness influences the adoption of positive selection (PS) technology among smallholder yam farmers in West Africa. PS has the potential of increasing yield and reducing disease incidence and severity in yam production.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the average treatment effect (ATE) methodology to estimate the rates of awareness and adoption of the PS technology and associated factors using data from 678 smallholder seed yam farmers in Ghana and Nigeria.

Findings

The results indicate that the actual adoption rates of PS technology are 58 and 55%, while the potential adoption rates are estimated at 89.5 and 79.3% for Ghana and Nigeria, respectively, if the PS technology was fully disseminated. This leads to adoption gaps of 31.7 and 24.8%, respectively, for Ghana and Nigeria stemming from incomplete awareness of the PS among the population of yam growing farmers. The PS adoption is high among the educated young farmers who are members of farmer based organizations and participate in demonstrations.

Practical implications

Promotional efforts for enhancing awareness and adoption of PS should target educated youth willing to participate in field demonstrations and should focus on scaling up of PS technology to ensure quality farmer saved seed yams and enhance yam productivity in West Africa.

Originality/value

The introduction of PS in seed yam production is quite recent also its introduction to seed yam farmers in West Africa. Subsequently, a better understanding of what the adoption status would be should everyone in the population of yam farmers are aware of PS is vital for policy, research and development.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Pei Duan, Shengdong Chen, Heng Zhang and Fuchun Zhang

This study aims to focus on the analysis of the internal mechanism of farmers’ ecological cognition and the behaviour of Grain for Green Project (GGP), and the further…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the analysis of the internal mechanism of farmers’ ecological cognition and the behaviour of Grain for Green Project (GGP), and the further relationship between ecological cognition and ecological aspiration, proposing climate change strategies and management from the perspective of farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

Theory of planned behaviour and social exchange theory were used to construct a theoretical framework and an ecological cognition under the influence of external factors, the aspiration and the behaviour of GGP, using ecological fragile areas in Bazhou and Changji, Xinjiang of 618 peasant households’ survey data. The structural equation model and Heckman two-step model were applied to analyse the relationship between ecological cognition and ecological aspiration of farmers, the impact of peasant households’ ecological cognition and aspiration to the behaviour of GGP and the influence factors of GGP behaviour.

Findings

This research’s results show that the three characterizations of ecological cognitive variables, attitude towards the behaviour (AB), subjective norms (SN) and perceived behaviour control (PBC), have significant positive impact on farmers’ GGP ecological aspiration. The comprehensive impact path coefficients of ecological cognition are PBC (0.498) > SN (0.223) > AB (0.177). Also, income change is a moderating variable, which has a significant moderating effect on the influence of AB and SN on ecological aspiration. Further, farmers’ ecological cognition has an influence on the behaviour of GGP, and the change of farmers’ income has a significant positive effect on farmers’ choice of returning farmland to forests.

Practical implications

The ecological protection policy suggestions and countermeasures can be drawn from the research conclusions, adapted to China’s ecologically fragile regions and even similar regions in the world to response the climate change.

Originality/value

Combining the theory of planning behaviour and social exchange, this paper empirically analyses the path of farmers’ ecological cognition and ecological aspiration, as well as the influencing factors.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Arnold Missiame, Patrick Irungu, Rose Adhiambo Nyikal and Grace Darko Appiah-Kubi

The study aims to estimate the rates of exposure to, and adoption of, rural bank credit programs by smallholder farmers in rural Ghana and the factors responsible for those rates.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to estimate the rates of exposure to, and adoption of, rural bank credit programs by smallholder farmers in rural Ghana and the factors responsible for those rates.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a random sample of 300 smallholder farmers in the Fanteakwa District of Ghana, obtained through the multistage sampling technique. The study also employed the average treatment effects approach to estimate the average treatment effect of farmers’ exposure to rural bank credit programs, on their adoption of such programs.

Findings

The actual adoption rate is approximately 41%, and the potential, conditional on the whole population being aware of rural bank credit programs, is approximately 61%. Accordingly, there is a gap of about 20% in the adoption of rural bank credit programs, and is due to the incomplete exposure of smallholder farmers to the rural bank credit programs. Age of the household head, access to extension services, membership in farmer-based organizations and active savings accounts with a rural bank are the major contributors to smallholder farmer exposure to and the adoption of rural bank credit programs.

Originality/value

The current study is the first of its kind to be conducted in Ghana on rural bank credit programs. It takes into account the extent to which smallholder farmers are exposed to such credit programs and how it influences their decisions to access or adopt.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Chandan Kumar Jha and Vijaya Gupta

The farmers used several information sources to gather information about the climatic variability and modern agricultural practices to cope with climate change. The choice…

Abstract

Purpose

The farmers used several information sources to gather information about the climatic variability and modern agricultural practices to cope with climate change. The choice of adaptation strategies and the successful implication of adaptation strategies depend on accurate, timely information on the climate variability and precise technical details of adaptation strategies. By keeping the importance of climate information and agricultural extension information in the center, this study aims to conduct a micro-level evaluation of farmers’ choice of climate information, agriculture extension services and agricultural credit sources. This study’s primary objective is to understand how the different sources of climate information and agricultural extension influence farm household adaptation decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has been conducted in three subs agro-climatic zone of the Middle Gangetic Plain region, which falls in India’s Bihar state. This paper has randomly selected seven districts from these three subs agro-climatic zone to collect the data. The analysis of this study is based on survey data collected from 700 farm households. This study has used descriptive statistics and a logistic regression model to assess the sources of climate information, agricultural extension and credit sources and how these sources influence farm households’ adaptation decisions.

Findings

The result of this study shows farmers are using different traditional (sharing experience, newspaper and radio), information and communication technology (mobile and TV) and institutional arrangements (agricultural officer and meteorological department) in the study area. The study’s finding identifies different farm households’ different sources and how these options farming farmers’ adaptation decisions. The study further revealed that institutional factors such as extension services and access to information on climate change increase the probability of adopting knowledge-intensive adaptation strategies such as soil conservation, water conservation, crop insurance and planting horticulture and vegetables.

Research limitations/implications

The study has conducted a micro-level assessment of adaptation behavior at the local level to understand the factor influencing the adaptation decision. This study’s finding is useful in designing the appropriate policy framework for the farm household’s capacity building to enhance their technical skills and awareness toward the institutional arrangements.

Originality/value

This paper’s finding pointed out institutional arrangements’ requirement to improve adaptive capacity to make long-term strategic decisions to cope with climate change.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Ying Yang, Mai Ha Pham, Biao Yang, Jun Wei Sun and Phuong Nguyen Thu Tran

While various aspects of the vegetable supply chain (SC) have been increasingly studied, most studies tend to investigate the downstream part of the SC in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

While various aspects of the vegetable supply chain (SC) have been increasingly studied, most studies tend to investigate the downstream part of the SC in terms of customer demand and product quality. Relatively fewer studies have focused on upstream suppliers/farmers. This study aims to understand upstream farmers’ positions in different types of vegetable SCs and identify ways of enhancing sustainable vegetable SC collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an in-depth case study of a cooperative SC in Vietnam from the perspectives of both the cooperative and its farmers.

Findings

The study found that cooperative SCs are the most appropriate for Vietnamese farmers. It also identified the key activities needed to engage farmers with cooperative SCs and the mechanisms that the cooperative needs to develop. Cooperative SCs can be enhanced only when farmers are motivated to engage in SC activities and when the cooperative implements a robust management mechanism.

Originality/value

This study provides new, insightful results on how to engage with small fragmented farmers for SC collaboration and how to enhance the roles of cooperative SCs in the vegetable industry in Vietnam. It also provides information for policymakers to support sustainable vegetable SC development and maintain its sustainability.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Bismark Amfo, James Osei Mensah, Ernest Baba Ali, Gilbert Dagunga, Seth Etuah and Robert Aidoo

This study investigates implications of crop and income diversifications on consumption expenditure (welfare) of rice-producing households in Ghana. It further compares…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates implications of crop and income diversifications on consumption expenditure (welfare) of rice-producing households in Ghana. It further compares diversification by three rice production systems: two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice production.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were sourced from 225 rice farmers. Margalef index and three-stage least-squares were employed.

Findings

Majority of rice-farming households in Ghana diversify livelihoods. The extent of livelihood diversification differs among two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice-producing households. Credit, distance to district capitals, production purpose and number of farming seasons influence crop and income diversifications, and consumption expenditure of rice-producing households. While crop diversification reduces consumption expenditure, income diversification increases it. Crop and income diversifications positively influence each other. Consumption expenditure reduces crop diversification but increases income diversification.

Practical implications

Policy should be directed towards the promotion of more livelihood activities to boost rice farmers' welfare. There should be awareness creation and training programmes to enable rice farmers realize different economic activities within and outside the agricultural value chain.

Originality/value

Crop and income diversifications were measured as continuous response variables, unlike previous studies that used a binary response variable. The authors established a synergy among crop and income diversifications, and consumption expenditure (welfare). The authors further compared crop and income diversifications by three rice production systems: two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice production systems.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Cristian Rogério Foguesatto and João Armando Dessimon Machado

Despite substantial efforts made by Brazil’s government to increase the adoption rate of sustainable agricultural practices (SAP), many of them have not been adopted by…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite substantial efforts made by Brazil’s government to increase the adoption rate of sustainable agricultural practices (SAP), many of them have not been adopted by the farmers. This paper explores the factors influencing the adoption of SAP in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, one of the largest Brazilian grain producers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using four logistic models, the authors test a conceptual framework that provides a systemic view of farmers' adoption decisions from a sample of 172 farmers.

Findings

The findings show that the adoption of SAP is influenced by farmers' socioeconomic characteristics (e.g. gender, level of education, farm size, asset values and farm income), attributes of SAP (compatibility of agricultural practice) and psychological factors (ecocentrism, anthropocentrism, and beliefs about climate change).

Research limitations/implications

The results presented may not reflect the characteristics of the region studied because random sampling was not employed. Also, other psychological statements should be used in the questionnaire.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given to the analysis of farmers' psychological factors in studies on the adoption of agricultural conservation practices. This study provides a “systemic approach” that measures both socioeconomic and psychological factors.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Orjon Xhoxhi, Domenico Dentoni, Drini Imami, Engjell Skreli and Olta Sokoli

In contexts of transition economies generally characterized by weak formal institutions, a rich literature remarks the important role of informal institutions in fostering…

Abstract

Purpose

In contexts of transition economies generally characterized by weak formal institutions, a rich literature remarks the important role of informal institutions in fostering entrepreneurial ecosystems. Nevertheless, in the agricultural context, little is known yet about how and why institutions shape farmer entrepreneurship. To better understand how informal institutions shape farmer entrepreneurship, this paper investigates how farmers' trust towards their buyers influence their entrepreneurial orientation (EO) in the rural context of a transition economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured survey was conducted in June–July 2017 with Albanian dairy farmers. In total, 238 milk producers were interviewed. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is employed to develop measures for the latent variables of the study (e.g. farmers' trust, EO), and an instrumental variable (IV) approach is employed to estimate the effect of farmers' trust towards the buyer on their EO, by using farmers' reciprocity as a suitable IV.

Findings

Empirical findings reveal that innovativeness, risk-taking and proactivity represent effective dimensions of farmers' EO also in the rural context of a transition economy. Furthermore, farmers' trust towards their buyers shapes their EO, and, at the same time, younger and wealthier farmers are more likely to have higher levels of EO.

Research limitations/implications

The results show that there is an association between farmers’ wealth and their EO. This relationship can go both ways. However, cross-sectional studies are not appropriate to investigate feedback loops.

Originality/value

This study addresses a knowledge gap in the institution–entrepreneurship literature in transition economies, by making two contributions. First, it tests the measurement model for farmers' EO, an established psychological antecedent of farmers' entrepreneurial activity. Second, it tests the hypothesis that farmers' trust towards their buyers may influence their EO.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

G.P. Archer, Judit García Sánchez, Gianpaolo Vignali and Aurélie Chaillot

The purpose of the research was to extend on previous research by studying latent consumers’ attitude to farmers’ markets. Findings will be used to improve the marketing…

Abstract

The purpose of the research was to extend on previous research by studying latent consumers’ attitude to farmers’ markets. Findings will be used to improve the marketing and publicity of farmers’ markets in order to attract other consumers groups. The people surveyed were not always aware of the term farmers’ market. Some think it is a place where farmers go to buy what they need. Around 94 per cent of people who have already been to a farmers’ market will return because they enjoy the food which is fresh, different, local, etc. and to support farmers. Latent consumers think that farmers’ markets sell fresh, quality, locally produced, tastier, healthier and seasonal food. However they do not expect the food to be cheaper. The most important criteria are quality, freshness and the fact that food is produced locally. Latent consumers would enjoy supporting local producers, information about the products and how to prepare them.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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