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Article

Farida Ally and Toni Brennan

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of East African Muslim families who have a family member diagnosed with schizophrenia in the UK mental health system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of East African Muslim families who have a family member diagnosed with schizophrenia in the UK mental health system.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth semi-structured interviews with East African Muslim participants who had a close family member diagnosed with schizophrenia.

Findings

Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed participants’ concerns over diagnosis, over the side effects of medication and over the lack of choice of treatment. They reported disappointment and frustration with the rejection by psychiatric services of alternative conceptualizations of mental distress incorporating religious beliefs. Participants called for more culturally sensitive service provision open to taking into account non-western conceptualizations of mental distress and its treatment.

Research limitations/implications

Caution should be exercised in drawing firm conclusions from a pilot study with only four participants although generalization is not an aim of small-scale qualitative research.

Practical implications

The overall negative perceptions of psychiatric services in the participants’ accounts point to poor communication between services and service users and their families. If there are attempts at culturally sensitive service provision, according to this study, they are implemented elsewhere/not extensive enough/not reaching everyone – which warrants further investigation.

Originality/value

This study is valuable because it offers insights on how East African Muslim families living in the UK (an under-researched minority) experience the impact of living with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and contact with mental health services, within the context of a “Western” model of mental distress dramatically different from and rarely open to the conceptualization shared in their culture of origin.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article

Dan W. Hess

Defines the term “emerging market” and identifies the necessary preconditions which allow stock markets to develop: government commitment, market economy, a legal system…

Abstract

Defines the term “emerging market” and identifies the necessary preconditions which allow stock markets to develop: government commitment, market economy, a legal system and generally available education. Discusses some factors affecting equity market growth, e.g. economic and regulatory development/reform, legal and market structure reform, requirements for financial intermediaries, disclosure, accounting standards and education/training for participants in financial markets. Explains how these factors apply to India, giving statistical indicators for the economy and the Bombay Stock Exchange for 1991‐1995. Believes the prospects for foreign and domestic equity investment in India and other developing countries are good providing that they maintain a stable economy and an investor‐friendly environment

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

Farida Chowdhury Khan

A fundamental premise of economic theory is that of a homogenous subject. This unified and intentional subject also implicitly defines the welfare function that forms the…

Abstract

Purpose

A fundamental premise of economic theory is that of a homogenous subject. This unified and intentional subject also implicitly defines the welfare function that forms the foundation of economic development theory and policy today. Unfortunately, such a concept of agency is representative of mostly urban and majority populations and does not include indigenous communities who are peripheral in most developing nations. The concept of development presumes an attachment to modernization and deracination, paying little heed to conservation of natural resources that are of sacral value to tribal communities. This paper aims to show how economics neglects cultural and group differences and yet asserts a powerful influence on development policy. Institutional economists and anthropologists have contested this hegemony but at the same time have also been co‐opted into development management in several ways that are discussed below.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of indigenous communities in Bangladesh is investigated and their exclusion from development elucidated by citing the conflicts that tribal groups have had with majority populations and the state. This is compared to the situation of tribal communities in the state of Kerala in India.

Findings

It is concluded that a heterogeneous imaginary at the level of the nation state allows possibilities for indigenous voices to be represented in development policy formation and that such heterogeneity itself opens the channel for an alternative construction of development.

Research limitations/implications

The case studies may not be widely applicable to every context.

Practical implications

The universality of policy suggestions should be questioned if such policy is not representative of minorities within the context of a nation.

Originality/value

The point that methodological individualism and the grounding in economics of development theory leads it to avoid community concerns has not been addressed before. The paper also looks at a historical development of the discourse of development in a new way. Finally, the case of Bangladesh has not been discussed in this manner or compared to Kerala.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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D. Kirk Davidson, Kanji Tanimoto, Laura Gyung Jun, Shallini Taneja, Pawan K. Taneja and Juelin Yin

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western…

Abstract

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western Europe. Inevitably, however, as the economic interaction of individual firms and entire nations has grown over the past several decades — call it globalization — so too has the concept and the practice of CSR spread throughout the world. It is certainly time to explore how CSR is being incorporated into the practice of business management in other regions and other countries. Therefore, in this chapter we will focus on Asia: specifically on Japan, South Korea, India, and China. It is interesting for academicians to understand how CSR is being absorbed and adapted into the business cultures of these four countries. Perhaps of even greater importance, it is vital that business managers know what to expect about the interaction between business and society as well as the government as their commercial activities grow in this burgeoning part of the world.

For each of these four countries, we will provide an overview of the extent to which CSR has become a part of the academic community and also how it is being practiced and incorporated in everyday management affairs. We will see that there are very significant differences among these countries which lead to the natural question: why? To answer this question, we will use an eight-part analytical framework developed specifically for this purpose. We will look at the history, the dominant religious beliefs, the relevant social customs, the geography, the political structures, the level of economic development, civil society institutions, and the “safety net” of each country. As a result of this analysis, we believe, academicians can learn how CSR is absorbed and spread into commercial affairs, and managers can profit from learning more about what to expect when doing business in this increasingly important region.

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Article

Nghia Nguyen Trong and Cong Thanh Nguyen

Debt, dividend and investment policy constitutes a company's important financial decisions to determine firm performance. The research emphasizes on the problem of…

Abstract

Purpose

Debt, dividend and investment policy constitutes a company's important financial decisions to determine firm performance. The research emphasizes on the problem of overinvestment, a phenomenon that worsens firm operation. Furthermore, it clarifies the moderation role of debt and dividend policy in mitigating the negative effect of overinvestment on firm performance in the case of Vietnamese listed companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses all financial statement of non-financial Vietnamese listed companies on Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi Stock Exchange in the period of 2008–2018. The data are collected from Thomson Reuters Eikon. The final data set is comprised of 669 listed companies. The study measures overinvestment though investment demand function and HP filter. Moreover, the research employs the dynamic model, so it has to apply the SGMM method to deal with the problem of endogeneity caused by the lagged dependent variable.

Findings

The research finds that overinvestment is negatively associated with firm performance. Debt or dividend policy separately can moderate the negative effect of overinvestment on firm performance. However, when these two policies are combined, they lessen the positive interaction impact of each policy due to the substitution between debt and dividend policy.

Research limitations/implications

The research may have two limitations. Firstly, the research measures overinvestment indirectly through investment demand function and HP filter. These two measures only help identify the sign that companies may have the problem of overinvestment because we cannot determine whether they overinvest or not in reality. Secondly, when using interaction variables, the problem of multicollinearity may be higher, and this may adjust the signs and significance level of variables in the models.

Practical implications

Practically, the research proposes three policy recommendations. Firstly, a company can exploit debt or dividend policy to limit excessive free cash flow in order to constrain the problem of overinvestment. Secondly, a company should enhance its corporate governance to resolve agency problems. Thirdly, the government should make the financial sector more transparent and effective to improve monitoring functions of various parties in the capital market.

Social implications

Overinvestment sometimes can cause social issues. Overinvestment means that companies make ineffective investment. If they continue this situation over a long time, companies may have financial distress or even go bankruptcy. As a result, it will slow down economic growth and increase unemployment in the economy.

Originality/value

The research is supposed to make two great contributions to the existing empirical studies in two aspects. Firstly, it is the first attempt to take into consideration the interaction between overinvestment and financial policies. Secondly, it helps enhance the fundamental stance of the agency theory, which supports the interdependence of debt, dividend and investment policy.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

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Article

Raneem AlMindeel and Jorge Tiago Martins

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of employee information security awareness in a government sector setting and illuminate the problems that public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of employee information security awareness in a government sector setting and illuminate the problems that public sector organisations in a developing context face when seeking to establish an information security awareness programme.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive research design was followed to develop an empirically enriched understanding of information security awareness perceptions, aspirations, challenges and enablers in the context of Saudi Arabia as a developing country. The study adopts a single-case study approach, including face-to-face interviews with senior employees, as well as document analysis.

Findings

The paper theorises the importance of individual information security awareness, knowledge and behaviour and identifies a number of facilitating conditions: customisation to employee and organisational needs, interactivity, innovation, frequency, integration of both electronic and physical learning resources and rewarding the acquisition of in-depth security-related actionable knowledge.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine information security awareness as a socio-technical process within a government sector organisation in a developing country context.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

George K. Chacko

Case Studies generally ask: (1) What accounts for the success/failure of this real‐life “Case” (Corporation, Government or Organization)?; (2) How can we transport the…

Abstract

Case Studies generally ask: (1) What accounts for the success/failure of this real‐life “Case” (Corporation, Government or Organization)?; (2) How can we transport the lessons learned across time and space?; (3) What immediate/eventual issue/objective(s) should the “Case” pursue to enhance its survival/success; and How? The student is graded on the Case Study on the force of his/her reasoning and arguments, two diametrically‐opposite action plans both scoring “A”. But which one should the CEO implement? Why? Are there minimal criteria that any Case Study of management should fulfill? The raison d etre of management is the pre‐committing of scarce resources for unknown/unknowable results (e.g., market share, mind share), which are generated by interactions of variables and/or participants. Does the Case Study identify the cogent interactions; does it suggest how to allocate resources to achieve pre‐specified results? This Case Study has been checked by the corporation for accuracy. Westructure the narrative by systems theory which provides a framework to assess what the company has achieved, and to formulate what it should do to improve its chances of survival/success. The theory is buttressed by illustrations of systems approach to complexity, ranging from Apollo lunar landing to the $91‐billion IT Services Company, IBM. According to National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), IT exports rose 30.5 percent to $12.5 billion in Fiscal Year 2003‐04 ending on March 31, 2004 from $9.6 billion in Fiscal 2002‐03. Indian exports totaled $52.72 billion in 2003‐04. Applying the growth in the first five months, we estimate the total exports in 2003‐04 at $54.8 billion. The IT exports contributed 18.2 per cent in 2002‐03, rising to 22.8 percent in 2003‐04.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Ehi Eric Esoimeme

This paper aims to examine the anti-corruption policy of the Federal Executive Council of Nigeria, to determine whether the policy is working and/or has produced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the anti-corruption policy of the Federal Executive Council of Nigeria, to determine whether the policy is working and/or has produced unintended effects. The Federal Executive Council is the body comprising all the Ministers of the Federation, including the President and Vice President.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis took the form of a desk study, which analysed various documents and reports such as the Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, 2008-2016, the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999 (as amended), the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (Establishment) Act, 2004, the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, 2015, the UK’s Investigatory Powers Act, 2016, the Public Interest Disclosure and Witness Protection Bill, 2017 and the Financial Action Task Force Recommendations, 2012.

Findings

This paper determined that the anti-corruption policy of the Federal Executive Council of Nigeria could achieve its desired objectives if the following recommendations are implemented: research grants which are sent to Nigerian universities by international and corporate bodies should be exempted from the current treasury single account arrangement. This would enable universities to easily access the funds and disburse the same to qualified students. The Federal Government should follow the guidelines laid down in Section 270 of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, 2015 for plea agreements. In other words, the prosecution should only offer a plea bargain to a person who has been charged with an offence. The prosecution should not receive and consider a plea bargain from a person who has not been charged with an offence. Any attempt to water down the effect of Section 270 of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, 2015 may weaken the ongoing fight against corruption and money laundering because criminals will be encouraged to continue looting public funds. The Financial Action Task Force Recommendations (Recommendation 3) requires that criminal sanctions for natural persons convicted of money laundering should be effective, proportionate and dissuasive. The Federal Government of Nigeria should introduce a Bill to the National Assembly that would provide a clear framework for the use of investigatory powers by law enforcement, the security and intelligence agencies and other public authorities. This includes the interception of communications, the retention and acquisition of communications data, the use of equipment interference and the retention and use of bulk data by the security and intelligence agencies. The Bill must establish a number of safeguards against the arbitrary or unlawful use of investigatory powers by the executive. The UK’s Investigatory Powers Act, 2016, for example, established a number of safeguards for the retention and acquisition of communications data. Authorisations for obtaining communications data will have to set out why accessing the communications data in question is necessary in a specific investigation for a particular statutory purpose and how it is proportionate to what is sought to be achieved. A police officer who receives information from a whistleblower about money hidden in an apartment should apply to a Court or Justice of the Peace within the local limits of whose jurisdiction he/she is for the issue of a search warrant before conducting a search on the said premises. This procedure is in line with Section 143 of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, 2015 and the Court of Appeal decision in Hassan v. E.F.C.C. (2014) I NWLR (Pt. 1389) 607 at 625. The Public Interest Disclosure and Witness Protection Bill, 2017 should be given accelerated consideration in the House of Representatives based on its urgency and significance for the Federal Executive Council’s whistleblowers policy.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focusses on the anti-corruption policy of the Federal Executive Council of Nigeria from 29 May 2015 to 10 June 2017. It does not address the older policies.

Originality/value

This paper offers a critical analysis of the new anti-corruption policy of the Federal Executive Council of Nigeria. The paper will provide recommendations on how the policy could be strengthened. This is the only paper to adopt this kind of approach.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article

Akume T. Albert and F.C. Okoli

This paper aims to assess if the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria from 2003-2012.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess if the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria from 2003-2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a documentary analytical approach.

Findings

The organization has not been effective in combating corruption in Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The study is between 2003-2012.

Practical implications

There is a need to correct those identified inhibitors that undermined the Commission’s capacity, such as intrusive government interference, lack of autonomy, poor funding and weak laws, among others, to mitigate corruption.

Social implications

Eliminating those identified constraints will remove the incentive to be corrupt, thereby curbing the desire to be corrupt.

Originality/value

This paper is an original assessment of the EFCC's effectiveness in combating corruption in Nigeria during the specified period.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article

Samir Yerpude and Sonica Rautela

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of real-time data emerging from implementation of the Internet of Things (IoT) and netnography on the efficiency of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of real-time data emerging from implementation of the Internet of Things (IoT) and netnography on the efficiency of the new product development (NPD).

Design/methodology/approach

Customer-oriented organizations are the ones that survive in the market with a flow of new products to the market. Expectations like reduced timelines with quality focus provoke innovations. Customer inputs become the soul for a successful product wherein it becomes important to keep a constant stream of information flow back from the market. Literature review states that real-time data gathering with the implementation of IoT ensures the same. Along with real-time data, researchers have envisaged the need to identify the customer persona before incorporating customer opinion and sentiments vide netnography.

Findings

The organization can leverage the collaboration of IoT origin real-time data and sentiment analysis to effectively manage the NPD. Real-time customer data coupled with customer opinions and sentiments prove to be a game changer in the NPD process.

Originality/value

The originalities of this study are impact of IoT origin real-time data coupled with sentiment analysis on the NPD process. While impact of IoT origin data is reported in isolation similar to sentiment analysis, influence of collaboration of real-time data with sentiment analysis on NPD process is reported in this study.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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