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Book part

Kehinde Olowookere

At the end of this chapter, learners should be able to:

  • Discuss the origin of family-friendly policies.
  • Explain the different types of family-friendly policies.
  • Explain the…

Abstract

Learning Objectives

At the end of this chapter, learners should be able to:

  • Discuss the origin of family-friendly policies.

  • Explain the different types of family-friendly policies.

  • Explain the importance of family-friendly policies.

  • Explore the financial implications of family-friendly policies.

  • Understand how to calculate leave payment.

  • Explain possible limitations of family-friendly policies.

Discuss the origin of family-friendly policies.

Explain the different types of family-friendly policies.

Explain the importance of family-friendly policies.

Explore the financial implications of family-friendly policies.

Understand how to calculate leave payment.

Explain possible limitations of family-friendly policies.

Details

Financial and Managerial Aspects in Human Resource Management: A Practical Guide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-612-9

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Article

Shalini Garg and Punam Agrawal

The objective of the study is to identify the themes of “family friendly practices” and to perform a literature review. The research aims to identify the emerging trends…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to identify the themes of “family friendly practices” and to perform a literature review. The research aims to identify the emerging trends in the area of “family friendly practices” by carrying out an exhaustive literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

The study synthesizes the literature between the years 2010 and 2019. First of all, 150 research articles were identified by keyword search, bibliography and citation search, out of which 57 research articles were selected on the basis of the most sound theoretical background and maximum literature contribution. The citation analysis method was performed on these studies in order to study the journals, authors by using Google Scholar, ResearchGate, the international database Science Citation Index and SCImago Journal Ranking.

Findings

The author citation count shows that the research topic is still getting recognition and the research in this area is increasing. The finding of the research is that the current research in family-friendly practices has focused mainly on seven topics: availability and usability of family-friendly policy, job satisfaction, organizational performance, supervisor or manager support, work–life conflict, employee turnover employee retention and women’s employment.

Originality/value

The study may provide valuable inputs to the HRD practitioners, managers, research scholars, to understand the recent trends in the field of family-friendly policy. As per the best knowledge of the author, this is the first study on family-friendly practices using citation analysis.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Grazia Garlatti Costa, Darija Aleksić and Guido Bortoluzzi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inverted U-shaped relationship that exists between exploitative leadership styles and innovation implementation. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the inverted U-shaped relationship that exists between exploitative leadership styles and innovation implementation. In addition, drawing on the social cognitive theory, the paper explores the effect of the three-way interaction between exploitative leadership style (ELS), work–family balance (WFB) and family-friendly workplace practices (FFWPs) on innovation implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study of 440 employees from 38 medium and large companies based in Italy and Croatia was conducted, using an online survey. The proposed hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that there is an inverted U-shaped curvilinear relationship between ELS and innovation implementation. Furthermore, the findings support the existence of the three-way interaction suggesting that the combination of high-level WFB and high-level FFWPs strengthens the relationship between ELS² and innovation implementation.

Originality/value

This is the first contribution that examines a curvilinear relationship between ELS and innovation implementation. Additionally, it contributes to the work–family literature by providing the first empirical examination of the joint impact of WFB and FFWPs in enhancing innovation implementation. Our results suggest that individuals who perceive a high level of WFB and who work in an organization with family-friendly practices are more accepting of an exploitative leader, and that the positive feelings from the family domain encourage the implementation of innovation. These results may change the attitudes of managers, encouraging them to consider WFB and FFWPs as important for the implementation of innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Sarah Robinson, Barbara Davey and Trevor Murrells

While European Union policy emphasises that one of the aims of family‐friendly working arrangements is to increasing gender equality, in the UK the focus has been…

Abstract

While European Union policy emphasises that one of the aims of family‐friendly working arrangements is to increasing gender equality, in the UK the focus has been primarily on workforce retention. Drawing on a study of Registered General Nurses who returned to work after breaks for maternity leave, this paper considers their preferences and experiences in light of current UK family‐friendly policies and the implications of the findings for increasing gender equality. Questionnaires were completed by respondents in three regional health authorities and focused on the four to eight year period after qualification. The following topics were investigated: views about length of maternity break and reasons for returning to work sooner than preferred; hours sought after a return and hours obtained; the availability of preferred patterns of work and of flexible hours; retention of grade on return; the availability and use of workplace crèches, and childcare arrangements when children were unwell.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Kate Siddall, Helen King, Therese Coleman and Bill Cotton

Discusses the launch of a public/private sector partnership in Leeds– Opp 2k. Explores why organizations should balance their workforces andhow this can be achieved. Opp…

Abstract

Discusses the launch of a public/private sector partnership in Leeds – Opp 2k. Explores why organizations should balance their workforces and how this can be achieved. Opp 2k exists to share work practices which contribute to the increase and improvement of the position of women in the workforce. Gives positive reasons why women should be developed in organizations and discusses family friendly policies and changing management styles.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

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Article

Barbara A.W. Eversole, Gene Gloeckner and James H. Banning

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore differential adoption of work/life programs by organizations by studying CEOs. Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore differential adoption of work/life programs by organizations by studying CEOs. Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual framework was developed from interview data from 26 Denver‐area (Colorado, USA) CEOs. Findings – A decision‐making model was conceptualized as the major finding of this study. CEOs decided on work/life programs on content‐based bottom‐line arguments, on process‐based criteria, such as moral, spiritual, or flexibility beliefs, or on personal experiences that these programs return to the bottom line. If a CEO decided based on bottom‐line arguments, the main variable is whether or not retention is important. Research limitations/implications – As a qualitative study, caution should be exercised in generalizing to the general population of CEOs, particularly those who choose not to adopt work/life programs. Practical implications – The study provides data useful for top management persuasion, executive development, understanding executive decision‐making processes, and understanding factors important to work/life program adoption. Originality/value – Many factors have been studied concerning differential work/life program adoption, including the composition of the HR team. This is the first study to consider the influence of CEOs as key decision‐makers in the adoption decision. This study also offers a model that potentially explains the decision‐making process used by executives for human resource programs, and perhaps other programs as well.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article

Sari Mansour and Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

The present study aims to investigate the mediating role of work–family conflict (WFC) and family–work conflict (FWC) on the effects of workload and the generic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the mediating role of work–family conflict (WFC) and family–work conflict (FWC) on the effects of workload and the generic and specific work–family social support in job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Using AMOS 20 through bootstrap analysis for indirect effect, the study assessed the abovementioned relationships based on data collected from 258 respondents in the hospitality industry in Quebec.

Findings

The findings indicate that workload increases job stress via WFC and FWC. Both generic and specific work–family social support decrease job stress through WFC and FWC. Organizational support for reconciling work and family life is more significant than generic supervisor support. Family support reduces job stress via WFC but not via FWC.

Research limitations/implications

In future studies, it would be interesting to explore the effects of variables such as gender, marital status, hotel category and the job category, as well as cultural origin.

Practical implications

The results of this research should alert employers in the hospitality industry to engage in family-friendly policies that include not only practices such as working time arrangements, family leave and onsite child care services, but also to be committed to create a family-friendly culture and to adopt the best forms of supportive policies at work.

Originality/value

By emphasizing cross-domain effects, the present research contributes to the existing knowledge by testing the mediating role of WFC and FWC in the effects of workload and various resources of social support on job stress.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part

Meral Erdirençelebi

In recent years, preparations for the transition from the Post-industrial society to Community 5.0 have been continuing at full speed. The change in this process…

Abstract

In recent years, preparations for the transition from the Post-industrial society to Community 5.0 have been continuing at full speed. The change in this process necessitates changes in the roles and structure of the labour force in societies. While work and family living spaces of the individual change the dimensions of his/her interaction, they increase the importance of work–family life balance gradually. The basis of conflicts (imbalances) in roles in work and family life is based on three pillars: time, tension and behaviour. The conflicts in the work and family life spaces take place in two sub-dimensions, namely ‘work-family conflict’ which is directed from work to family and ‘family-work conflict’ which is directed from family to work. The conflict between work and family life leads to individual, organisational and familial consequences. Effective communication with the social support of the organisation and the members of family is of great importance for individuals not to experience a work–family conflict.

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Article

Suzan Lewis, Carolyn Kagan and Patricia Heaton

An area of diversity currently receiving attention is the large proportion of the workforce with commitments to care for a family. Many organisations have introduced …

Abstract

An area of diversity currently receiving attention is the large proportion of the workforce with commitments to care for a family. Many organisations have introduced “family friendly” policies including parental leave, childcare assistance and reduced hours of work. But this tends to focus on mothers of healthy, young children. The intense, long‐term needs of disabled children can severely stretch the provision organisations make for parents. This article presents an interview survey of parents with disabled children. It argues that, while many of the parents experience problems establishing a work‐home balance, these are partly caused by blocks within the wider community. Organisations can certainly reap benefits from making special arrangements for employees with disabled children but there are limits to corporate responsibility in relation to non‐work barriers. The article highlights the need for diversity initiatives to look beyond the workplace and incorporate aspects of the wider context in which organisations operate.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Monica Forret and Suzanne de Janasz

This study sets out to examine whether protégés have more favorable perceptions of an organization's culture for balancing work and family than non‐protégés.

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine whether protégés have more favorable perceptions of an organization's culture for balancing work and family than non‐protégés.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 418 employees of a major public accounting firm who completed a survey on mentoring and work‐family issues. Correlation analyses, t‐tests, and regressions were performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results strongly support the view that protégés had more favorable perceptions than non‐protégés of the organization's work‐family culture – the degree to which integration of employees' work and family lives is supported. Having a mentor was significantly related to each component of work‐family culture (managerial support, time demands, and career consequences) in the predicted direction.

Research limitations/implications

By focusing on respondents in a single firm, it is impossible to determine whether the findings generalize to individuals in other industries or companies.

Practical implications

To attract and retain employees, organizations have become increasingly concerned about their cultures for balancing work and family. By encouraging mentoring, organizations can transmit the message to their employees of resources and support available to help achieve balance.

Originality/value

Despite strong interest in the fields of mentoring and work‐family balance, few research studies have attempted to link these two domains. This research integrates these areas and demonstrates the important role mentors play in developing perceptions of an organization's culture for work‐family balance.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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