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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Christy M. Borders, Marcus Daczewitz and Kristi M. Probst

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related…

Abstract

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related to education can be daunting and, at times, confusing. This chapter will focus on three important educational transitions: early intervention, school age, and adulthood. For each transitional period, recommendations for best practices are made. Additionally, this chapter will discuss the importance of transition planning and supports over time. Overall, communication between service providers, families, and the student is a key element to making these transitions smooth and successful.

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Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Alexis T. Franzese, Kaitlin Stober and Amy L. McCurdy

Within the field of medical sociology, there is an extensive body of literature on notable family transitions and stages in the reproductive cycle, such as getting married…

Abstract

Within the field of medical sociology, there is an extensive body of literature on notable family transitions and stages in the reproductive cycle, such as getting married or becoming a parent, as they relate to mental health and well-being. However, the transition to becoming a completed family, that is, the process of determining or recognizing that one’s family is complete, is notably absent. In response to this empirical gap, this chapter presents findings from 114 semi-structured interviews with participants who reported having at least one child and who considered their family to be complete. First, the concept of “family completion” is introduced and conceptualized based on the qualitative considerations of participants and the contextual medical sociology literature. Then, thematic considerations around the process of family completion, related emotional preparations, and factors associated with mental health and well-being are explored. Findings suggest that family completion can be an important transitional period for parents and can be associated with emotional hardship for some individuals. Participants described experiencing conflict with their partner if they disagreed on the completion decision, frustration and sadness related to infertility, and/or feelings of loss or depression when completion was regarded as the end of a personal or familial life phase. This chapter concludes that creating a cultural context in which family completion is a recognized family transition period may spur intentional consideration among parents and promote the design of intervention services for parents experiencing changes in mental health or well-being.

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Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Linda Ward, Pauline Heslop, Robina Mallett and Ken Simons

Transition to adulthood can be a difficult time for all young people and their families, but young people with learning disabilities face additional stresses. Transition

Abstract

Transition to adulthood can be a difficult time for all young people and their families, but young people with learning disabilities face additional stresses. Transition for young people with learning disabilities is highly topical, in relation to both policy and practice. Legislation and guidance offer various mechanisms for improving transition, including transition planning, health action planning and Connexions personal advisers. This study of 283 families with youngsters with learning disabilities found that existing legislation and guidance were largely failing youngsters with learning disabilities and their families at transition. There were substantial discrepancies between what ought to have been provided and what young people and their families experienced in practice, and significant difficulties as youngsters moved between children's and adult health and social services. Other difficulties experienced at transition are also reviewed, along with possibilities for improvements in practice.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Jan Blacher, Bonnie Kraemer and Erica Howell

The differential impact of young adult diagnosis on families during the period of transition from school to adult life was examined. Participants were parents of 246 young…

Abstract

The differential impact of young adult diagnosis on families during the period of transition from school to adult life was examined. Participants were parents of 246 young adults with severe learning disability aged 18‐26. Young adults were classified into four diagnostic groups: autism (N = 30), Down's syndrome (N = 68), cerebral palsy (N = 95) and an undifferentiated learning disability group (N = 53). Research questions pertained to parent expectations about their young adults' transition to living and working environments post high school. Parental satisfaction and worries were also assessed. The results indicated more community expectations of work for young adults with Down's syndrome, and more restrictive expectations for young adults with autism, including more expectations that young adults with autism would move out of the family home into a residential environment. Parents of young adults with autism also worried significantly more about various aspects of transition than other parent groups.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Manoj Joshi

The case aims around transition and threats to survival in a brick kiln family business. Second, it stimulates an understanding on the need toward collective decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The case aims around transition and threats to survival in a brick kiln family business. Second, it stimulates an understanding on the need toward collective decision making by the family during the maturity stage of the family business. The purpose of this paper besides addressing entrepreneurship is to examine the “family-ness” in a family business and its benefits, the transition management issues and to understand the difficulties in handling conflicts during succession and transition cycle in a closely held family business.

Design/methodology/approach

The case is based on primary research, which is exploratory and secondary information followed by testing the case several times. To authenticate information, multiple sources of information with individual interviews both structured and unstructured at different levels have been used in a time frame of over one year.

Findings

The competency of the business purely lies in the quality of the product, utilization of market opportunity, harnessing capability, honesty and complete involvement in business. Undoubtedly, the family business has reflected growth but its existence in near future is doubtful due to certain exogenous uncontrollable factors, such as restriction by government regulation. The subsequent generation desires to actively participate in the family business. However, it is constrained by the new government regulations and the business life cycle. Thus, the family is reluctantly compelled to start focusing on newer alternatives or business ideas. Transitions, both in business and in family, have posed a challenge to the founder. Should the family continue in the same business with added constraints or the next generation starts building on a new idea as an option and spin-off from existing family business? These are scenarios for trade-offs.

Research limitations/implications

The case is restricted to transition in business and in family, within a traditional family business of brick kilns. It is about a strategic choice impending with the founder and his siblings. Interpretations may be connected with related family businesses; however, riders exist, as different firms falling under different industry verticals undergo unique scenarios.

Practical implications

The outcome of the research-based case study shall assist entrepreneurs in the brick kiln industry to understand transition issues and challenges imposed upon due to changing government regulations.

Social implications

Implications exist for practitioners who may like to anticipate conflict arising due to transition and have mitigation techniques in place.

Originality/value

The case is original, while the new generation is looking to switch or diversify the business.

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Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2012

Jennifer LoCasale-Crouch, Kathleen Moritz Rudasill, Beverly D. Sweeney, Chalatwan Chattrabhuti, Christine Patton and Robert Pianta

Developmental science and school research identify children’s transition to kindergarten as a sensitive period with significant implications for formal school success. In…

Abstract

Developmental science and school research identify children’s transition to kindergarten as a sensitive period with significant implications for formal school success. In this chapter, we present evidence that a successful transition to kindergarten requires more than ensuring that children have requisite competencies. Instead, we present an ecological model that conceptualizes smooth transitions from pre-kindergarten to kindergarten as a function of linkages between systems, such as connections between schools and families and between pre-kindergarten and kindergarten teachers and classrooms, especially those made prior to kindergarten entry. This chapter provides an overview of research on and best practices for effective pre-kindergarten to kindergarten transitions that support children’s development and school readiness. Evidence for the ecological framework supporting this critical transition is provided, including how transition and alignment practices are associated with optimal outcomes for children. Promising practices from the field that promote alignment between pre-kindergarten and kindergarten experiences are also addressed. Additionally, we present several case studies detailing the ways in which different localities have used empirically supported transition practices to support children’s early school success. Finally, we conclude with thoughts regarding future directions for transition and alignment work in early childhood.

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Transitions Across Schools and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-292-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Michael H. Morris, Roy W. Williams and Deon Nel

Classifies controllable or internal factors influencing family business transitions into three groups: preparation level of the heirs, family relationships, and planning…

Abstract

Classifies controllable or internal factors influencing family business transitions into three groups: preparation level of the heirs, family relationships, and planning and control activities. To assess the impact of each set of factors on the ease of generational transitions and subsequent family business performance, a cross‐sectional survey was directed at owner/ managers of second‐ and third‐generation family businesses. Suggests that, in successful transitions, heirs are reasonably well‐prepared, family relationships tend to be positive, and succession planning and related control activities are relatively informal. Of these three, trust and communication in family relationships appears to have the most significant impact on transitions. Draws managerial implications and makes suggestions for ongoing research.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Predrag Ljubotina and Jaka Vadnjal

Family business successors have three career options. They may find a job, start their own business or join their family business and eventually take it over. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Family business successors have three career options. They may find a job, start their own business or join their family business and eventually take it over. This broadens the scope of a common entrepreneurial dilemma of whether to start a new venture or seek hired employment. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problem from multiple angles in two different socio-political environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among senior students in 34 countries with 109,000 participants. Several influencing variables such as family business background, motivation for self-employment, university environment and family business performance were defined. The used multinomial logistic regression with categorical three-dimensional independent variable allows to capture the complexity of an individual’s approach to career choice intention taking into consideration family business performance, personal motives for self-employment and university support for entrepreneurship.

Findings

All hypotheses include succession intention as a central category. There is significant correlation between friendly and supportive environment for entrepreneurship at university and the successor’s career choice. Performing family business is positively connected with the succession preference compared to the other two career alternatives. In the market economy group, students, who attended at least one entrepreneurial course, exhibit a significant preference for succession compared to employment. Male students are more likely to choose succession career than employment and founding a new own venture than succession. Students with family business background exhibit significant preference towards succession.

Originality/value

Some EU countries have a common denominator of almost 50 years of communist regime experience, which broke the entrepreneurial tradition and for a couple of decades prolonged the development the market economy. The value of the study is in the model comparison of transition and market based economies in the EU.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Martin R.W. Hiebl, Birgit Feldbauer‐Durstmüller and Christine Duller

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate whether the transition from a family business to a non‐family business affects the institutionalisation of management accounting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate whether the transition from a family business to a non‐family business affects the institutionalisation of management accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an online survey among all large and medium‐sized Austrian firms. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to test the impact of the level of family influence on aspects of the institutionalisation of management accounting. Firm size is included as the main control variable.

Findings

A lower level of influence from the controlling family was found to be correlated with the institutionalisation and intensification of management accounting in medium‐sized firms. For large firms, such a linear relationship could not be drawn. The level of education of management accountants was inversely correlated with the level of family influence in both large and medium‐sized firms.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into the reasons, underlying drivers and inter‐organisational promoters of management accounting change in family businesses is needed. Furthermore, the organisational impacts of the transition from family businesses to non‐family businesses deserve further investigation.

Originality/value

A framework for assessing the organisational effects of the transition from family businesses to non‐family businesses is provided. The empirical results on the impact of the transition on the institutionalisation of management accounting are presented. The level of family influence was found to act as a significant contextual factor for the organisation of management accounting in medium‐sized firms.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2013

Lynda L. Anderson, Sheryl A. Larson and Shauna McDonald

This study examined access to and quality of supports for families of adolescents with disabilities.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined access to and quality of supports for families of adolescents with disabilities.

Methodology

An online survey was completed by family members of transition-aged young adults who had participated in parent training sessions on topics related to transitions to adulthood. Survey responses came from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 4 U.S. territories.

Findings

More than one-third of families reported unmet information needs related to areas such as employment, housing, preparing for adult relationships, and preparing others to support the family members with disabilities. Families of younger transition-aged youth, youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder or other disabilities, and families with lower household incomes reported more unmet needs. The overall quality of services families reported receiving was 2.19 on a 4-point scale of 1 to 4. Parents reported needing more information and quality of supports related to the transition of youth from school to adulthood.

Practical implications

Given the scope of unmet needs, ongoing collaboration between schools, agencies, organizations, and other entities that serve families is critical. While schools play a key role in supporting the transition process, other organizations also have a role.

Social implications

The results from this survey demonstrate that the need for support is not limited to youth with disabilities, but that family members also have information and support needs related to their roles as caregivers in the transition process.

Originality

This survey provides information about unmet needs and current services from a national sample that includes often underserved populations and includes sufficient numbers of respondents to allow comparisons between families, based on the type of disability their family member had.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

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