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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Carole Talan

Public libraries providing family literacy programming make a sound investment in the future, by developing the future of the family, the community, the library and the…

Abstract

Public libraries providing family literacy programming make a sound investment in the future, by developing the future of the family, the community, the library and the nation. Family literacy programs help the adult parent or caregiver to successfully fulfill his role as the first and foremost teacher of his children. Public libraries are a natural as a family literacy provider. Many public libraries deliver many of the basic components of a sound family literacy program. And, family literacy programs bring more resources into the library than they use. This article explains why this is so and provides a thumbnail sketch of the first state‐wide, state‐funded, public library‐based, family literacy initiative, California’s Families For Literacy Program.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Stephanie L. McAndrews and Shadrack G. Msengi

Purpose – This chapter describes the structure and environment of the Cougar Literacy Clinic, the theoretical framework, and the transferred and transformed knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter describes the structure and environment of the Cougar Literacy Clinic, the theoretical framework, and the transferred and transformed knowledge and practices that support the constituents as a community of learners.

Theoretical perspective/methodology – Our research embraces theories of transfer and transformation, self-extending systems, intersubjectivity, social constructivism, social learning, and social cultural that helps to explain how children, families, teachers, other educators, administrators, professors, and community members learn and benefit through mutual interactions, as they find ways to help each other become better thinkers and decision makers. The data were categorized into four types of practices from the clinical experience that have transferred to and transformed the school and community. These categories of practices include assessment, instruction, coaching and consultation, and family–school–community literacy connections. The data analysis and interpretation demonstrate the importance of having a shared understanding regarding literacy development, learning, and teaching that enhances each member's intellectual and academic growth.

Practical implications – Our Cougar Literacy Clinic innovations, built on beliefs of shared understanding, can be a model for both existing and newly established clinics that are striving to transform the thinking of each member involved. During assessment practices, each of the constituents will learn to make informed decisions on the selection of assessments and analysis of assessment data, confidently identify their own and others strengths and needs, and provide constructive feedback. In the areas of instruction, reciprocal coaching, and family–school–community literacy connections, each of the constituents will learn to focus on strengths and prior knowledge, scaffold learning, and pose and respond to questions.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Caroline Barratt-Pugh, Mary Rohl and Nola Allen

In this chapter we begin by discussing the concept of inclusion, with a particular focus on inclusion in literacy learning in the early years (birth to five) in Australia…

Abstract

In this chapter we begin by discussing the concept of inclusion, with a particular focus on inclusion in literacy learning in the early years (birth to five) in Australia. We then consider the research evidence for the potential impact of home literacy practices in the early years on later school and life outcomes, and examine some early childhood family literacy initiatives that aim to help develop young children’s literacy learning. We describe how Better Beginnings, a universal family literacy programme, supports parents/carers and children to build their skills, knowledge and understandings of early literacy. We show how Better Beginnings has operated, adapted and expanded in response to longitudinal systematic evaluations and explain how new programmes have been created to address the specific needs of particular groups of families, with the long-term intent of maximising inclusion for all families of young children in Western Australia. We identify aspects of inclusion, through which diversity is constructed as the norm rather than the exception. We conclude by suggesting that establishing connections between family literacy practices and school literacy programmes which embrace inclusivity is one of the first steps towards ensuring that all children are able to reach their potential and become active participants in a literate society.

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Inclusive Principles and Practices in Literacy Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-590-0

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Lina Trigos-Carrillo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the literacy practices of the families and communities of first-generation college students in Latin America, and how community…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the literacy practices of the families and communities of first-generation college students in Latin America, and how community and family literacies can inform the understanding of first-generation college students’ identity and cultural values.

Design/methodology/approach

This transnational ethnography was conducted in local communities around three public universities in Mexico, Colombia and Costa Rica. Participants included nine fist-generation college students and more than 50 people in their families and communities (i.e. relatives, parents and friends). Data gathering occurred at the university outside the formal space of the classroom, at home, and in the community. Data were interpreted through the lens of the community cultural wealth framework.

Findings

The author found that first-generation college students and their families and communities engaged in rich literacy practices that have been overlooked in policy, research, and media. It is argued that the concept literacy capital is necessary to acknowledge the critical literacy practices communities engage in. Literacy capital was manifested in these communities to preserve cultural traditions, to sponsor literacy practices and to question and resist unjust sociopolitical circumstances.

Practical implications

The findings of this study should inform a culturally sustaining pedagogy of academic literacies in higher education. Beyond asset-based approaches to academic literacies in Latin America, critical perspectives to academic literacies teaching and learning are needed that acknowledge the Latin American complexities.

Originality/value

These findings are significant because they unveiled how people in local communities were informed about the sociopolitical dynamics at the national and international scale that affected or even threatened their local culture, and how they used their literacy capital to react critically to those situations.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Carole S. Talan

Family Literacy Specialist, Carole Talan gives us her own impressions on how the home environment affects the young reader; both positively and negatively. Drawing from…

Abstract

Family Literacy Specialist, Carole Talan gives us her own impressions on how the home environment affects the young reader; both positively and negatively. Drawing from her Californian perspective, Talan outlines the role libraries can play in establishing a positive, literate atmosphere for children who do not enjoy that luxury at home.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Cathy Nutbrown, Julia Bishop and Helen Wheeler

– The purpose of this paper is to report on how early years practitioners worked with the ORIM Framework to support work with parents to promote early literacy experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on how early years practitioners worked with the ORIM Framework to support work with parents to promote early literacy experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-produced Knowledge Exchange (KE) was used to develop and evaluate work with parents to facilitate their young children’s literacy. Information was gathered in discussion groups, interviews with parents and practitioners and feedback from all the parties involved.

Findings

Practitioners and families engaged with each other in the further development of an established literacy programme, and families demonstrated “ownership” of the co-produced knowledge after the end of the project.

Research limitations/implications

Project design in co-produced research and KE is necessarily flexible. The focus is on practitioners’ knowledge and ownership of the process, sharing knowledge with parents and enhancing children’s experiences.

Practical implications

Practices that can enhance parental engagement in their children’s early literacy are varied and multiple and ORIM can be used flexibly to plan, develop and evaluate innovative and community – (and family –) specific practices.

Social implications

Where parents have more knowledge of children’s early literacy development they are in a better position to support them; for learning communities there are implications in terms of future development of work with families to support early literacy development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes an original approach to the co-production of research with early years practitioners. It also identifies specific issues around the ethics of ownership in co-produced research.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2015

Renée T. Clift, Chris Da Silva Iddings, Donna Jurich, Iliana Reyes and Kathy Short

This chapter is about the multiple forms of collaboration that are crucial to designing and implementing a school and community-based early childhood teacher preparation…

Abstract

This chapter is about the multiple forms of collaboration that are crucial to designing and implementing a school and community-based early childhood teacher preparation program. Maintaining quality in education and teacher education is a systemic, interdependence among individuals, institutions, and local, state, and national policy makers. We conclude that teacher education redesign is less about courses and pedagogies and more about systemic relationships, routines, and evaluations over time.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part C)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-674-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Briony Train

This paper presents a summary of international research in the field of family reading, a subject which refers both to the development of the literacy skills of family

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a summary of international research in the field of family reading, a subject which refers both to the development of the literacy skills of family members, and to their shared process of reading.

Design/methodology/approach

It begins by defining the key terms in family reading, then introduces the research methods employed in research in this area.

Findings

Research specifically focusing on parents is presented, with particular reference to young parents and fathers in prison. The issue of intergenerational reading is also introduced, whereby (in this instance) the young and the elderly share experiences via reading. The final theme of the paper is that of families sharing reading for pleasure, and public reading events for families are described. The paper concludes with a series of barriers to family reading, and a suggested model of effective family reading, for families and communities in any country.

Research limitations/implications

In a paper of this scale and length, it is impossible to give more than a limited perspective of international research on family reading, yet the author believes that sufficient examples are given – and the research methods sufficiently globally applicable – for the paper to be of theoretical and practical value to public and school librarians, and academics.

Originality/value

The paper collates and reflects on examples of international research and practice, whilst providing a solid framework of research methods in the area of family reading.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Laura Teichert

This paper describes the unintended and unanticipated ways an iPhone as a data collection tool created distractions during observations of five-year-old twins' digital…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the unintended and unanticipated ways an iPhone as a data collection tool created distractions during observations of five-year-old twins' digital literacy practices while in their home.

Design/methodology/approach

Situated in sociocultural theories of learning and development and new literacy studies, the 12-month-long case study examined young children's digital literacy practices in their homes before and during their transition into kindergarten. The article focuses on the data collection of five-year-old twins in their home with their parents, a family the author called the Skywalkers. Data sources included semistructured interviews, participant observations and informal conversations.

Findings

The mother was a low-technology user and preferred her children to engage in nondigital activities. The children were permitted 10 min every other day of “digital time.” The iPhone as a data collection tool provided them with digital access they would otherwise not have. The mother knew the focus of the study was digital engagement and that the iPhone was used for data collection (i.e. photographs and videos). Although the iPhone was intended to be used in establishing rapport and taking photographs, the children frequently asked to video record their play and therefore the iPhone became a distraction.

Originality/value

Given the prevalence of smartphones in Western society, the recruitment of a family with such low-technology use was unforeseen. As digital data collection increases in qualitative research, researchers should not assume that a smartphone is always appropriate for gathering photographic data. This is particularly important when investigating digital literacy practices of families in their homes.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Steve Sumerford

Any professional fundraiser will tell you that literacy, particularly family literacy, is “a sexy issue” these days. During the past few years, foundations, corporations…

Abstract

Any professional fundraiser will tell you that literacy, particularly family literacy, is “a sexy issue” these days. During the past few years, foundations, corporations, and civic organizations generously have distributed funds to any literacy project that appears to be effective in solving one of the nation's most debilitating problems, illiteracy. Across the nation, schools, community groups, daycare centers, and myriad other agencies all have obtained funds to develop these literacy programs.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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