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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Louise Gillies and Helen M. Burrows

Families conduct their affairs through processes that are built upon those of previous generations and also social capacities such as culture, class, oppression and…

Abstract

Families conduct their affairs through processes that are built upon those of previous generations and also social capacities such as culture, class, oppression and poverty. The media has played a part in stereotyping the lower classes through their portrayal on the television programmes such as Benefits Street and Jeremy Kyle and tabloid newspaper stories. This chapter is a case study of two families who are at the opposing ends of the social scale, the Horrobin/Carter and Aldridge families. The two families were chosen due to them being linked by marriage in the younger generation. Through the use of genograms, we explore how the families differ in their attitudes towards relationships within their individual families, and also how they relate to each other as separate family groups. Despite the many differences, there are also a number of key similarities, particularly regarding the key females in the families, in terms of family background and snobbery. We also show that there is little family loyalty in the more privileged family and a power differential between the two families (oppressors vs. oppressed) in terms of the crimes committed.

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Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Damith T. Woods, Cathy Catroppa, Celia Godfrey and Vicki A. Anderson

Where no psychosocial or interventional support is provided, children with acquired brain injury (ABI) are at significant risk of serious long-term behavioural and social…

Abstract

Purpose

Where no psychosocial or interventional support is provided, children with acquired brain injury (ABI) are at significant risk of serious long-term behavioural and social difficulties. The purpose of this paper is to report the six- and 18-month long-term treatment effects of a family centred behavioural intervention to help families manage and prevent challenging behaviours in children following ABI.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 parents were followed up at three time points (post-intervention, 6 and 18 months) after participating in an ABI adapted manualised “Signposts for Building Better Behaviour” programme (Hudson et al., 2003).

Findings

Attrition rates were highest amongst families caring for a child with mild ABI. The maintenance of treatment effects were detailed for those families who reported a reduction in challenging behaviour immediately post-intervention. There were no significant elevations in challenging child behaviour, maladaptive parenting, or family dysfunction for any participants over the long-term follow-up. Irrespective of injury severity, parents reported high levels of satisfaction and efficacy in the parenting role at 18 months post-intervention.

Originality/value

“Signposts” has further demonstrated its clinical viability by meeting the needs of parents who have a child with ABI in both the short- and longer-term.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

David Joubert

The idea that criminal behavior is a function of the offender's personality, also called the Homology hypothesis, has a long history in forensic psychology and…

Abstract

Purpose

The idea that criminal behavior is a function of the offender's personality, also called the Homology hypothesis, has a long history in forensic psychology and criminology. This assumption, however, has been decried as lacking empirical support. In spite of much social concern relative to sexual offenses, there is virtually no research looking at the stability of offending pattern in sex offenders of adult women. This paper aims to fill some of the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

Latent structure analyses were conducted on a secondary dataset including 145 serial rapists. A cross‐sectional, discrete time‐series design was used including a sequence of three offenses.

Findings

Moderate support was found for the three main assumptions underlying the Homology hypothesis. Offenses tended to share a relatively similar underlying structure, with the victimology and aggression components being more prominent than the sexual dimension. The three primary profiles identified, labeled “Passive”, “Stranger‐aggressive”, and “Antisocial”, were found to be about 50 percent stable across the sequence. Finally, the presence of significant dysfunction in the family of origin predicted membership in the “Antisocial” class, as well as increased the specificity and stability of this profile. The presence of early maladjustment was not related to any of the states.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the results, it is proposed that future research incorporates contextual‐environmental elements in order to increase the validity of the findings.

Originality/value

This study represents a unique attempt at documenting patterns of stability and variations across incidents of rape, using an institutional sample. Furthermore, it illustrates the use and potential benefits of latent structure models in criminological research.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Damith Thushara Woods, Cathy Catroppa, Senem Eren, Celia Godfrey and Vicki A. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to review and summarise a small but growing body of literature demonstrating that by embedding intervention within a family context offers the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and summarise a small but growing body of literature demonstrating that by embedding intervention within a family context offers the greatest promise of success in working with families caring for a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

The current family-centred evidence-based research indicates the potential benefits for the delivery of family focused interventions following childhood TBI.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the paediatric TBI literature as being of the few papers to incorporate a number of novel family-centred behavioural interventions into the one review paper.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Melati Sumari, Dini Farhana Baharudin, Ida Hartina Ahmed Tharbe, Norsafatul Aznin A. Razak and Norfaezah Md Khalid

This study aims to explore the family experiences of delinquent adolescents and uses a descriptive phenomenological research design.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the family experiences of delinquent adolescents and uses a descriptive phenomenological research design.

Design/methodology/approach

The study explores the family experiences of delinquent adolescents and uses a descriptive phenomenological research design. Eight adolescents that were under detainment in a rehabilitation centre in Malaysia participated in the study. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and reflective journals.

Findings

Five themes common to the participants’ experience were inductively identified from the analysis. These were: life without guidance, alienation and isolation, conflict on how the family is managed; I am still a little child and prisoners at home.

Originality/value

Despite many studies on delinquent adolescents were conducted in Malaysia, no study has been conducted so far to explore and understand the experience of female adolescents in their families.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jessica Asscher, Jo Hermanns and Maja Deković

The prevalence, correlates (child behaviour problems and negative parenting) and determinants (risk and protective factors) of parental need for support were examined in a…

Abstract

The prevalence, correlates (child behaviour problems and negative parenting) and determinants (risk and protective factors) of parental need for support were examined in a community sample of 177 mothers with a child aged 1.5‐3.5 years, in order to draw a profile of families that need parenting support. A substantial number of the mothers reported needing support (40% reported need for information, 10% reported family and social support needs). This need was related to child behaviour problems and to negative parenting. Maternal depression, difficult temperament of the child and negative life events, as well as total number of risk factors, significantly predicted the need for support. Satisfaction with support (but not number of support sources) acted as a protective factor.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Abstract

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Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Theodore Mutale

Although substance misuse by adolescents is widespread, few previous studies have investigated illicit drug use in adolescent psychiatric populations. The literature on…

Abstract

Although substance misuse by adolescents is widespread, few previous studies have investigated illicit drug use in adolescent psychiatric populations. The literature on adolescent substance misuse has focused on risk factors, and protective factors have received little or no attention. The study examined substance misuse and its correlates among young people referred to a regional adolescent psychiatric service. Co‐morbidity of substance misuse and psychiatric disorder was discussed, and the possible role of substance misuse as a gateway to adolescent offending examined. Recommendations for the development of adolescent substance misuse services are made.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Pooja B. Vijayakumar and Christopher J. L. Cunningham

Globalization has led to individuals working and living outside their native country. The purpose of this paper is to examine relationship between motives for expatriation…

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization has led to individuals working and living outside their native country. The purpose of this paper is to examine relationship between motives for expatriation and cross-cultural adjustment in Indian expatriates working in the US information technology (IT) industry. Additionally, the moderating effects of self-initiated expatriates (SIE) and organizational expatriates (OE) on the relationship between motives for expatriation and cross-cultural adjustment were studied. Also, existing measures in this area of research were analyzed to improve validity and utility for future studies. Participants responded to questions via an internet survey.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 336 Indian IT professionals working in America. The authors evaluated the psychometric quality of reasons for expatriation and cross-cultural adjustment measures by considering various fit statistics, modification indices and rational judgment based on item content. The authors used a maximum likelihood extraction method with an oblique rotation (Geomin) for these factor analyses, given the theoretically and empirically supported relationship between the subdimensions of both measures. Using these purified measures, a hierarchical regression analyses procedure was used to test the hypothesized relationships. A computational tool called PROCESS was used to test the hypothesized moderating effect of expatriate type on the relationship between motives for expatriation and cross-cultural adjustment.

Findings

Preliminary factor analytic work suggested modifications to the reasons for expatriation measure used to quantify participants’ motives for expatriation. Using this revised measure, those with stronger financial (mercenary) motives for expatriation also reported less positive cultural adjustment, while those with stronger exploratory motives for expatriation reported more positive cultural adjustment. Some evidence was also observed for a weak, but notable moderating effect of expatriate type (SIE vs OE) on the relationship between expatriation motives and cultural adjustment.

Originality/value

This study presents a revised measure of expatriation motives, as well as expanded theoretical and empirical evidence base to help future researchers working with expatriates. The findings may be also helpful to organizations and consultants who work to prepare expatriates for their assignments, especially when these expatriates are Indian professionals preparing to work in the USA.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Claire Cody

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential use of creative, arts-based methods to address child sexual exploitation (CSE) through connecting with and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential use of creative, arts-based methods to address child sexual exploitation (CSE) through connecting with and supporting young people affected by CSE; and engaging the wider community through awareness-raising and education to help keep young people safe. The use of the arts in building understanding, promoting agency, educating and countering negative portrayals of those affected by CSE are also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review identified that there is currently a limited evidence-base surrounding the use of arts in addressing the negative outcomes for young people affected by CSE and promoting the inclusion and safety of young people in the community. To explore the potential use of the arts in engaging young people and the communities they inhabit, this paper draws from research with other “hard to engage” and stigmatised groups, and learning from efforts to tackle other sensitive and challenging issues that impact on communities.

Findings

The paper suggests that despite the relatively young evidence base concerning the role of creative, arts-based methods to tackle CSE, there is relevant transferable learning that suggests that there is potential in utilising the arts to help prevent CSE and promote community safety.

Research limitations/implications

There is a clear need to consider the ethical implications of this work and to further examine how the arts may be utilised to tackle CSE and bring about positive outcomes for both individuals and for the wider community.

Originality/value

The paper brings together bodies of literature from other fields to explore the potential use of creative arts-based methods to tackle a significant contemporary issue of community safety.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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