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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Sokchea Lim, Simran K. Kahai and Channary Khun

The purpose of the paper is to examine how much difference in income can be explained by familial culture that persists in different societies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine how much difference in income can be explained by familial culture that persists in different societies.

Design/methodology/approach

We employ a two-step methodology to evaluate the impact of familial culture on income across countries. In the first step, we construct the macro measures of familial culture from micro survey data. In the second step, the growth model is estimated.

Findings

First-step micro regression results show that family is more important to female, richer, highly educated, unemployed and married individuals. Male, poorer, less educated and unemployed individuals are more likely to respect and love parents unconditionally. The same group is also more likely to think that parents must do the best for their kids. Finally, the macro results show that the strength of national familial ties explains significant differences in income across countries.

Research limitations/implications

We show that countries with weak family ties are richer than those with strong family ties. These results are useful for policymakers who design public policies that accommodate the type of familial culture that persists in their society.

Originality/value

We construct the macro measures of familial culture from the micro survey data. The paper adds to the literature on the effect of culture on income at the macro level.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Alexei Tretiakov, Christian Felzensztein, Anne Marie Zwerg, Jason Paul Mika and Wayne Gordon Macpherson

To explore the cultural context of Indigenous family entrepreneurs and to apply to them the concept of n-Culturals, thus contributing to validating the concept.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the cultural context of Indigenous family entrepreneurs and to apply to them the concept of n-Culturals, thus contributing to validating the concept.

Design/methodology/approach

Interview data collected from Wayuu entrepreneurs in La Guajira region of Colombia and from Māori entrepreneurs in the Rotorua region of New Zealand were analyzed qualitatively. The analysis primarily focused on Wayuu entrepreneurs, with the results for Māori entrepreneurs used for comparison, to help to interpret the Wayuu data.

Findings

For Wayuu entrepreneurs, family members play a range of crucial roles in enterprise operations, with the family and the kin-centered local Indigenous community emerging as an informal organization surrounding the enterprise. Family is the source of Indigenous culture, while the mainstream culture is centered on global Western business culture, rather than the culture of the country. The Indigenous entrepreneurs integrate the values of the two cultures in managing their enterprises, thus acting as n-Cultural. Māori entrepreneurs who managed enterprises with a strong Indigenous character were similar in this respect to Wayuu entrepreneurs.

Social implications

As n-Culturals integrating the values of Indigenous culture and the mainstream culture, Indigenous entrepreneurs develop valuable traits, becoming a valuable component of the human capital in their regions, even when their enterprises fail.

Originality/value

Existing research on multicultural individuals is largely limited to immigrants and expatriates. By characterizing Indigenous family entrepreneurs as n-Culturals, the present study contributes to validating the concept and opens the way for further research on how Indigenous entrepreneurs manage their multicultural identities.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Noel D. Campbell, Kirk H. Heriot and Dianne H. B. Welsh

Using the family business succession, resourcebased view of firms, familiness, and organizational clan literatures, this article develops a model based on the ability of…

Abstract

Using the family business succession, resourcebased view of firms, familiness, and organizational clan literatures, this article develops a model based on the ability of the family business to use familiness, a specific bundle of attributes deriving from a family’s culture, as a competitive advantage for the family firm. In particular, this resource-based framework of family business shows how familiness can distinguish between family firms that succeed beyond the second generation and those that do not. Implications for future research are discussed.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Christopher Karl Köhr, Armando Maria Corsi, Roberta Capitello and Gergely Szolnoki

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational systems, market orientation, family culture and the long-term business performance of family

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational systems, market orientation, family culture and the long-term business performance of family businesses in the wine sector in three countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey by questionnaire was undertaken with 123 wineries in Australia, Germany and Italy. Multiple-item measurement scales and multiple regression models were used to investigate mediation effects.

Findings

The findings indicate a marked influence of organizational systems and family culture on financial performance. Market orientation fully mediates the effect of family culture and partially mediates the effect of organizational systems on financial performance.

Practical implications

From a managerial perspective, this research indicates the central role of family culture when evaluating a firm’s capabilities and potential in the long term. The findings and their implications are of immediate concern for family firms in the wine sector.

Originality/value

For the first time, the antecedents of market orientation are investigated through simultaneous application of two key frameworks from marketing research and family business research in a single joint analysis.

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

William David Brice and James Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to empirically compare values and beliefs of family‐business members with those of professional managers across two countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically compare values and beliefs of family‐business members with those of professional managers across two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach utilizes a survey comparing 163 family‐firm members and 168 bank managers in Ukraine and the USA, looking for differences between the culture of members of family‐owned firms and non‐family professionals; and especially the direction of any differences.

Findings

The findings show significant differences between family‐firm members and non‐family professionals in both countries. Differences are in the same direction for three constructs. While this study is limited in only examining two countries, the results imply a conclusion that higher social flexibility and spirituality and lower power distance are potentially universal in terms of family‐firm culture.

Originality/value

This study's value is in illuminating specific fundamental cultural traits that may be related to family‐firm competitive advantage that researchers have noted in the literature.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sylvie Laforet

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of organisational culture (OC) on organisational innovation performance (OIP) in family small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of organisational culture (OC) on organisational innovation performance (OIP) in family small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). It seeks to establish the type of culture that lead to high innovation performance in family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A postal survey of family SMEs across sectors in the UK is conducted. The study employs multiple regression analyses to test which family business culture has an effect on OIP. Among the family business cultures tested are: an external cultural orientation, a flexible and open OC as well as an organisational climate based on open communication and trust, the founder culture, and a long-term cultural orientation.

Findings

The findings show that a paternalistic and founder culture type do not have a positive effect on family firm innovation performance, but an entrepreneurial-like culture does, i.e. one that is externally oriented, flexible, proactive (refer to an open culture) and long-term oriented. Similarly, an inward focus culture such as, the founder culture impedes innovation; while an outward focus culture such as, an external orientation culture has a positive effect on family firm innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study makes valuable contributions to the understanding of theory and practices of innovation in family businesses. It provides future research directions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Isabel C. Botero, Ascensión Barroso Martínez, Galván Sanguino and Juliana Binhote

The purpose of this study was to understand how the family system plays a role in knowledge sharing (KS) within family firms. The authors argue that the family’s influence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to understand how the family system plays a role in knowledge sharing (KS) within family firms. The authors argue that the family’s influence can occur through two routes. An external route in which the family affects the culture of the organization and through an internal route in which family leadership within the firm affects the practices and behaviors within the business.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this project came from the survey responses of 93 Spanish family firms.

Findings

The findings expand previous understanding about KS in family firms by outlining the two routes through which the family can have positive effect on KS within family firms. Results show that family system characteristics (i.e. next-generation commitment, family trust and intergenerational relationships) affect KS through their impact on the participative culture of a family firm. Additionally, when a family has been in control of the business for more generations, they place higher importance on family legacy and continuity, which is likely to strengthen the relationship between participative culture and KS in family firms.

Originality/value

Given the important role that the family system plays within the family business, this paper explored how family characteristics can influence KS in family firms. The authors contribute to the literature by highlighting the importance that the owning family can have in creating an environment that can facilitate KS in family firms.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Salomé Goñi, Pilar Corredor and Consuelo León

This research addresses how companies develop a process of transformation to a more family responsible behaviour and the role that women play in this process. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This research addresses how companies develop a process of transformation to a more family responsible behaviour and the role that women play in this process. This paper aims to propose a model in which a female workforce is seen as contributing to the development of the family responsible firm. The model includes two paths for transformation, the supportive work–family culture and the managerial strategy for work–family using a mediation model. The analysis was performed in a sample of 1,048 Spanish firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using Baron and Kenny’s (1986) mediated regression technique, the Sobel’s test (1982) and a bootstrap re-sampling with 5,000 and 10,000 iterations to determine the significance of the mediation.

Findings

The results confirm the impact of the proportion of women in the workforce on organizational culture and managerial strategy, factors that lead to a real increase in the accessibility of work–family policies. The mediation effect is total.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations stemming from the survey used and from the cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

The role of women, the culture and managers in promoting work–family policies appears clear. The need for the active reinforcement of the supportive work–family culture in companies and managerial strategy, diffusion, planning and involvement are all key factors in the development of work–family policies.

Social implications

Governments and society as a whole should urge firms to use all means at their disposal to guarantee the formal adoption of work–family policies.

Originality/value

Research that analyses the way in which work–family culture and the managerial strategy for work–family generate change does not usually incorporate the female component of the labour force as an explanatory element.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Tanuja Agarwala, Amaia Arizkuren, Elsa Del Castillo and Marta Muñiz

To understand whether the three dimensions of work–family culture, namely managerial support, negative consequences and organizational time demands relate in different…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand whether the three dimensions of work–family culture, namely managerial support, negative consequences and organizational time demands relate in different ways with different types of commitment; affective, continuance and normative. The relationships were examined in a three-country cross-national context.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey was conducted in India, Peru and Spain among executives and managers drawn from both the manufacturing and the services sectors.

Findings

The three countries were both similar and different with Peru and Spain more similar to each other than with India. Managerial support dimension of work–family culture predicted affective commitment across all the three countries. Differences were found with respect to predictors of normative commitment. Managerial support predicted normative commitment for Spain. Lower negative career consequences resulted in decreased normative commitment among the managers in Peru and Spain.

Research limitations/implications

The study has limitations of generalizability and common method variance.

Practical implications

Human resource managers will find the study useful to determine which dimensions of work–family culture would predict the outcomes desired. The study has implications for the design of human resource practices in the industry.

Originality/value

The study is the first that addresses the three dimensions of work–family culture and organizational commitment in a cross-national context. The study suggests that the way in which work–family culture is conceptualized and experienced by employees may vary even among countries classified as “collectivist.”

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Torbjörn Ljungkvist and Börje Boers

The purpose of this paper is to understand the interdependence between regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated regions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the interdependence between regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated regions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a literature review and helps to fill the knowledge gap regarding regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated contexts.

Findings

The authors highlight similarities and differences between two regions of Sweden with distinct regional cultures that support resilience. A number of norms that are significant in generating resilient regions are identified. One key finding is that the regional culture developed during the proto-industrial era, in connection with home production, still affects and contributes to resilience in these family business-dominated regions.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on two case studies, so no generalizable conclusions can be drawn.

Practical implications

For policy makers, this study shows that structural crises can be overcome with a strong regional culture, as it can foster resilience. However, regional culture is hard to implement by political decisions. For owners and managers of organizations, this study suggests that it is essential to consider regional culture as an important factor for the organization.

Originality/value

This study draws on a comparison of two regions in Sweden with explicit regional cultures.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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