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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Theresa Char Fei Ho, Noor Hazlina Ahmad and Ramayah Thurasamy

This paper proposes a conceptual framework that would be able to explain the importance of workplace familism on business performance through an organizational learning…

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1147

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a conceptual framework that would be able to explain the importance of workplace familism on business performance through an organizational learning capability as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual approach is taken whereby this paper is based on an extensive literature review of workplace familism and organizational learning capability. Four prepositions were proposed to highlight the focus of this study which is how workplace familism can be capitalized through organizational learning capability to enhance SMEs business performance.

Findings

This paper provides a theoretical discussion on the importance of organizational learning capability in ensuring the survival of the family business. The concept of workplace familism are relatively new, hence, it offers an interesting avenue for further research especially in the Malaysian context.

Practical implications

The paper draws attention to the importance of workplace familism and learning organization in fostering entrepreneurial survival and performance among SMEs.

Originality/value

This paper shed some insight on the subject on workplace familism and organizational learning capability in small and medium enterprise (SMEs) which hopefully would attract scholars and researchers to pursue more research on this area.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Carlos Aguilar

Coming of age in the United States as an undocumented immigrant alters traditional rites of passage such as “completing school, moving out of the parental home…

Abstract

Coming of age in the United States as an undocumented immigrant alters traditional rites of passage such as “completing school, moving out of the parental home, establishing employment, getting married, and becoming a parent” (Gonzales, 2011, p. 604). Yet, the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012 began to reconcile some aspects in the life, educational, and occupational trajectories of nearly 800,000 youths. It is in the context of moving out the parental home or relocating that this chapter explores the decisions or processes that DACA beneficiaries encounter. Considering how “illegality,” place, and family impact the individual, this chapter demonstrates how different immigration statuses, attitudes, behaviours, and structures disparately, yet unequivocally, continue to frame coming of age processes. Drawing from seven interviews with undocumented Mexican youth benefiting from DACA along the Texas–Mexico border, this chapter introduces the term mixed-status familism. Mixed-status familism provides a nuanced approach to understand the ways in which the mixed-status nature of a family, their attitudes, behaviours, structures, and the place in which they reside continue to frame newly obtained individual opportunities in general and transitions to adulthood like relocating in specific. While most literature points to the benefits that DACA has provided for individuals and a few explore how these have transferred to the family, this chapter captures how family buffers both the impact of an undocumented status and the benefits of a temporary legal protection.

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Rethinking Young People’s Lives Through Space and Place
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-340-2

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Marcela Sotomayor-Peterson and Ana A. Lucero-Liu

The purpose of this paper is to assess the associations between familism, frequency of physical contact, and marital satisfaction with mental health and well-being in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the associations between familism, frequency of physical contact, and marital satisfaction with mental health and well-being in a sample of 58 female marital partners of migrants who stayed in Mexico when their spouses migrated to the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 58 women were recruited through word of mouth in Sonora, Mexico. All women had their partner (the father of her children) living in the USA. Survey was administered face-to-face in participants’ homes.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analysis found that higher marital satisfaction and frequency of physical contact predicts mental health and well-being. However, familism was not associated with mental health and well-being for female partners of migrants.

Originality/value

This work is unique in that the current sample of female partners of migrants originate from the Sonora border region and has greater physical contact with their partner than most studies on transnational families assume. Approximately 40 percent of participants residing in the Sonora border state meet with their partners at least once a month. Additionally, this work provides an intimate face to the understanding of the very specific processes distinctive of inhabitants of border regions that are part of international migration. In order to promote health equity, health providers (e.g. counselors) need evidence-based information to tailor services to the specific needs of underserved Mexican transnationals.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Dianna L. Stone, Richard D. Johnson, Eugene F. Stone‐Romero and Mark Hartman

Using data from 184 employed Hispanic‐American and Anglo‐American participants in the United States, the present study examined the relations between four cultural values…

Abstract

Using data from 184 employed Hispanic‐American and Anglo‐American participants in the United States, the present study examined the relations between four cultural values (i.e., collectivism, power distance, familism, present time orientation) and job choice preferences. Results revealed that (1) collectivism was positively related to the importance of coworkers and working in a diverse organization, (2) familism was related to preferences for jobs with personal time off, and (3) power distance was related to the importance of organizational reputation and promotion opportunities. In addition, the findings revealed that, relative to Anglo‐Americans, Hispanic Americans felt that organizational reputation, flexible work hours, bonuses, and diversity were more important job choice factors. Implications are offered for conducting future research on job choice and developing recruitment practices in multicultural organizations in the United States.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Hohjin Im and Chuansheng Chen

This study sought to examine the relation of cultural practices and values with favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Additionally, this study's purpose was also to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the relation of cultural practices and values with favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Additionally, this study's purpose was also to examine how trust mediates the relation between culture and favoritism.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlations were used for exploratory investigation into the bivariate relations between culture and favoritism and nepotism/cronyism across 97 cultures. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were then conducted to examine the cultural correlates of favoritism and nepotism/cronyism holding all other variables constant. Lastly, partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to examine the mediating role of societal levels of trust.

Findings

Bivariate correlations showed that collectivism, familism, uncertainty avoidance, and power distance are positive correlates of both favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Institutional collectivism, future orientation and trust, on the other hand, were negative correlates of favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Uncertainty avoidance and trust were key correlates of favoritism while familism and future orientation were key correlates of nepotism/cronyism. Trust fully mediated the relation between culture and favoritism but did not mediate the relation between culture and nepotism/cronyism.

Originality/value

This study adds to the current body of literature on culture and favoritism. Notably, the findings regarding different key cultural correlates with respect to favoritism and nepotism/cronyism provide valuable implications for expanding our understanding of the psychological and social nuances of favoritism. Specifically, favoritism in transactions and interactions with those not bound by social commitment relationships may be explained by beliefs while interactions with those with social relationships (e.g., family and friends) may be explained by preferences.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Suri Weisfeld-Spolter, Fiona Sussan, Cindy Rippé and Stephen Gould

Debt is at a peak and consumers purport needing help with financial planning. To better understand the antecedents of financial planning behavior, the purpose of this…

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1048

Abstract

Purpose

Debt is at a peak and consumers purport needing help with financial planning. To better understand the antecedents of financial planning behavior, the purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of cultural values in financial decision making within the context of Hispanic American consumers. A new conceptual model is proposed to integrate affect (cultural value) and cognition (financial knowledge) in financial planning.

Design/methodology/approach

To uncover respondents’ views on cultural values, financial knowledge, financial attitude, and financial planning behavior, an online survey hosted on a business school’s website was distributed to members of two Hispanic Chambers of Commerce. The survey consisted of five parts, and took each respondent an average of 15 minutes to complete. The final data set has 158 observations.

Findings

Results analyzed using structural equation modeling confirmed the hypotheses that financial knowledge, attitude, and perceived control simultaneously influence Hispanic consumers’ intentions to purchase financial planning products or services. More interestingly, these results confirm that multiple different routes coexist in the decision-making process, especially within the Hispanic financial planning context.

Originality/value

Key contributions of this paper include the conceptualization of cultural value as an antecedent to Hispanic financial behavior; detailing the different routes to financial decision making for US Hispanic consumers; and informing financial service managers on marketing strategies toward Hispanic consumers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Maaja Vadi and Michael Vereshagin

The aim of this paper is explore how organizational culture is influenced by collectivism in Russia and draw some recommendations from human resources perspective because…

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2089

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is explore how organizational culture is influenced by collectivism in Russia and draw some recommendations from human resources perspective because Russia differs from most Western countries in several ways, one of the key ones being a much higher tendency to collectivism.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey questionnaires were used in order to discover interrelations between characteristically collectivism and organizational culture. Organizational culture was turned into the task and relationship orientations approach and three levels of collectivism were distinguished. A total of 586 employees working for various organizations in Russia participated in this study.

Findings

First, it was discovered that Russians hold collectivistic attitudes (familism and patriotism) showing correlation with both orientations (task and relationships) of organizational culture. The results show that familism is negatively correlated with task orientation, while Patriotism is positively correlated with task and relationship orientations. These findings make it possible to develop recommendations for human resources management (HRM).

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study are related to organizational culture approach and the Russians' multifaceted ethnic and cultural background. Nevertheless, this study illuminates various issues that may influence HRM practices in Russia.

Practical implications

The Russian organizations have some specific characteristics and this paper explains how those might be better managed. Special attention is paid on the HRM strategy and policy in the Russian context.

Originality/value

The main value of the paper is related to the contribution to the understanding which cultural factors may influence the HRM practices in Russia.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Book part
Publication date: 16 February 2012

Jorun Solheim and Ragnhild Steen Jensen

The importance of family firms for the development of capitalism, both past and present, has in recent years become widely recognized. Today there is a fast increasing…

Abstract

The importance of family firms for the development of capitalism, both past and present, has in recent years become widely recognized. Today there is a fast increasing body of literature about forms of family business and variations in family capitalism. Despite this new interest, few of these studies have made the family itself the focus of enquiry – and how different types of family structures and cultural traditions may influence the strategies and development of the family firm. Such connections are explored by comparing and discussing two cases of family firms and their history, set in Norway and Italy, respectively. It is argued that these two cases may be seen as examples of quite different ‘modes of familism’, with different implications for the running of an economic enterprise. These differences concern, first and foremost, cultural conceptions of gender, forms of inheritance, and the role of marriage in constituting the family firm.

Details

Firms, Boards and Gender Quotas: Comparative Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-672-0

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Yonglong Zhou, Qiongjing Hu, Jingjing Yao and Xin Qin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of family business owners’ intrafamily succession intention based on the theory of planned behavior and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of family business owners’ intrafamily succession intention based on the theory of planned behavior and neo-institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

National survey data were collected from Chinese private firms in 2010, and a sample of 804 family firms was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

At the micro level, familism, intrafamily succession regulation and family control have positive effects on owners’ intrafamily succession intention. At the macro level, district succession orientation, which is the district prevalence of intrafamily succession practice, has a positive effect on owners’ intrafamily succession intention. Additionally, the district succession orientation weakens the positive effects of intrafamily succession regulation and family control.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of family business owners’ intrafamily succession intention from both micro and macro perspectives. Besides, it also contributes to the integration of micro and macro research by examining the interaction effects.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Sinclear R. Ndemewah, Kevin Menges and Martin R.W. Hiebl

It is difficult to develop an overall picture of the practice of management accounting (MA) in farms and farm enterprises (FEs) because little research has been published…

Abstract

Purpose

It is difficult to develop an overall picture of the practice of management accounting (MA) in farms and farm enterprises (FEs) because little research has been published on the topic, and these studies are mostly discrete and unconnected to the others. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the available research, develop an explanatory framework for MA practices in farming entities and identify some major avenues for future research on the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses systematic literature review methods. After an extensive database search and an examination of references/citations, 41 empirical journal articles published between 1964 and 2016 are identified, described and analyzed in this research paper.

Findings

The findings reveal that the practice of MA in farms is subject to information problems and that the empirical research on this topic largely lacks a theoretical explanation. Therefore, the explanatory framework of MA practices in farming entities reveals that these practices are subject to influencing factors such as familism, government farm policies, market competition, technological changes, the seasons and the weather/climate.

Research limitations/implications

The overall limited findings on the practice of MA in FEs indicate that caution should be taken when generalizing the current knowledge on the use of MA practices in other organizational forms to farming entities. Moreover, future research should draw on explicit theories to explain empirical results.

Originality/value

This paper is the first comprehensive literature review of studies on MA practices in farms and FEs.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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