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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Christopher J. Rees and Beverley Metcalfe

Explores the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results in occupational settings. Identifies three specific lines of research into faking‐good: first, whether it is…

Abstract

Explores the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results in occupational settings. Identifies three specific lines of research into faking‐good: first, whether it is possible for candidates to fake‐good personality questionnaire results; second, whether faking‐good adversely affects the criterion validity of personality questionnaire results; third, whether candidates actually engage in faking‐good behaviour. Notes, in relation to this third line of enquiry, the lack of information about the views of candidates and potential users of personality questionnaires towards the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results. Proceeds to explore the views of 190 people employed in personnel departments in the North‐West of England towards various issues associated with the faking‐good of personality questionnaire results. These issues include: the ease with which personality questionnaire results can be faked; the ease with which faking‐good can be detected; the extent to which candidates actually fake‐good; the ethics of faking‐good responding. The implications of the study focus on matters such as the face validity of personality questionnaires, the training of test users and the future development of non‐transparent fake‐good scales.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2021

Vartika Pundir, Elangbam Binodini Devi and Vishnu Nath

This study aims to examine the collective impact of awareness and knowledge about fake news, attitudes toward news verification, perceived behavioral control, subjective…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the collective impact of awareness and knowledge about fake news, attitudes toward news verification, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, fear of missing out (FoMO) and sadism on social media users’ intention to verify news before sharing on social media.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study’s conceptual framework is developed by a comprehensive literature review on social networking and the theory of planned behavior. The data for samples were collected from 400 respondents in India to test the conceptual framework using the partial least square–structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The results show that awareness and knowledge, perceived behavioral control, attitudes toward news verification and FoMO are significant predictors of intention to verify news before sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The present study concludes implications for managers of social media companies and policy actors that want to take steps toward arresting the spread of fake news via social media.

Originality/value

Academic investigation on fake news sharing on social media has recently gained traction. The current work is unique because it uses the theory of planned behavior as a basis for predicting social media user’s intention to verify news before sharing on social media.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Karine Aoun Barakat, Amal Dabbous and Abbas Tarhini

During the past few years, the rise in social media use for information purposes in the absence of adequate control mechanisms has led to growing concerns about the…

Abstract

Purpose

During the past few years, the rise in social media use for information purposes in the absence of adequate control mechanisms has led to growing concerns about the reliability of the information in circulation and increased the presence of fake news. While this topic has recently gained researchers' attention, very little is known about users' fake news identification behavior. Hence, the purpose of this study is to understand the factors that contribute to individuals' identification of fake news on social media.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a quantitative approach and proposes a behavioral model that explores the factors influencing users' identification of fake news on social media. It relies on data collected from a sample of 211 social media users which is tested using SEM.

Findings

The findings show that expertise in social media use and verification behavior have a positive impact on fake news identification, while trust in social media as an information channel decreases this identification behavior. Furthermore, results establish the mediating role of social media information trust and verification behavior.

Originality/value

The present study enhances our understanding of social media users' fake news identification by presenting a behavioral model. It is one of the few that focuses on the individual and argues that by identifying the factors that reinforce users' fake news identification behavior on social media, this type of misinformation can be reduced. It offers several theoretical and practical contributions.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Godson A. Tetteh, Kwasi Amoako-Gyampah and Amoako Kwarteng

Several research studies on Lean Six Sigma (LSS) have been done using the survey methodology. However, the use of surveys often relies on the measurement of variables…

Abstract

Purpose

Several research studies on Lean Six Sigma (LSS) have been done using the survey methodology. However, the use of surveys often relies on the measurement of variables, which cannot be directly observed, with attendant measurement errors. The purpose of this study is to develop a methodological framework consisting of a combination of four tools for identifying and assessing measurement error during survey research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluated the viability of the framework through an experimental study on the assessment of project management success in a developing country environment. The research design combined a control group, pretest and post-test measurements with structural equation modeling that enabled the assessment of differences between honest and fake survey responses. This paper tested for common method variance (CMV) using the chi-square test for the difference between unconstrained and fully constrained models.

Findings

The CMV results confirmed that there was significant shared variance among the different measures allowing us to distinguish between trait and faking responses and ascertain how much of the observed process measurement is because of measurement system variation as opposed to variation arising from the study’s constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one country, and hence, the results may not be generalizable.

Originality/value

Measurement error during survey research, if not properly addressed, can lead to incorrect conclusions that can harm theory development. It can also lead to inappropriate recommendations for practicing managers. This study provides findings from a framework developed and assessed in a LSS project environment for identifying faking responses. This paper provides a robust framework consisting of four tools that provide guidelines on distinguishing between fake and trait responses. This tool should be of great value to researchers.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Scott Dacko, Rainer Schmidt, Michael Möhring and Barbara Keller

  • Appreciate the scope and pervasiveness of fake reviews in retailing
  • Recognise the causes of fake reviews in retailing
  • Understand consumer responses to fake reviews in retail

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

  • Appreciate the scope and pervasiveness of fake reviews in retailing

  • Recognise the causes of fake reviews in retailing

  • Understand consumer responses to fake reviews in retail

  • Understand how retailers can and should manage fake reviews

  • Understand better the expected future of retail with fake reviews

Appreciate the scope and pervasiveness of fake reviews in retailing

Recognise the causes of fake reviews in retailing

Understand consumer responses to fake reviews in retail

Understand how retailers can and should manage fake reviews

Understand better the expected future of retail with fake reviews

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Oberiri Destiny Apuke and Bahiyah Omar

This study developed a predictive model that established the user motivational factors that predict COVID-19 fake news sharing on social media.

Abstract

Purpose

This study developed a predictive model that established the user motivational factors that predict COVID-19 fake news sharing on social media.

Design/methodology/approach

The partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used for the analysis. Data were drawn from 152 Facebook and WhatsApp users in Nigeria to examine the research model formulated using the uses and gratification theory (UGT).

Findings

We found that altruism, instant news sharing, socialisation and self-promotion predicted fake news sharing related to COVID-19 pandemic among social media users in Nigeria. Specifically, altruism was the strongest predictor to fake news sharing behaviour related to COVID-19, followed by instant news sharing and socialisation. On the contrary, entertainment had no association with fake news sharing on COVID-19.

Practical implications

We suggest intervention strategies which nudge people to be sceptical of the information they come across on social media. We also recommend healthcare providers and the Nigerian government to provide relevant information on this current pandemic. That is, correct information should be shared widely to the public domain through various conventional and online media. This will lessen the spread of fake news on the concocted cure and prevention tips found online.

Originality/value

The salient contributions of this study are as follows: First, it brings to the fore that the desire for self-promotion is associated with fake news sharing on social media; second, it shifts the focus of studies on fake news from detection methods to sharing behaviour, which fuels the uncontrollable spread of falsehood; third, it expands the existing literature on misinformation sharing by demonstrating the user motivation that leads to fake news sharing using the UGT.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Magnus Osahon Igbinovia, Omorodion Okuonghae and John Oluwaseye Adebayo

The continuous spread of the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated public health concern with avalanche of information accompanied by series of fake

Abstract

Purpose

The continuous spread of the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated public health concern with avalanche of information accompanied by series of fake news. Thus, this study examined the effect of Information Literacy Competency (ILC) in curtailing the spread of fake news among Library and Information Science (LIS) undergraduates in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research design of the descriptive type was used to generate data from a group of LIS undergraduates online. The population of the study consisted of 138 LIS undergraduate students who participated in the survey (thus, n = 138). The data retrieved was subjected to descriptive analysis.

Findings

The study revealed that the students had high level of ILC (x ¯ = 3.42), and there was low prevalence level of COVID-19 pandemic fake news (x ¯ = 2.35) among them. The major causes of COVID-19 fake news were too much information in circulation concerning COVID-19 (x ¯ = 3.44) and the resultant inability to discern or spot fake news from verified and authentic news (x ¯ = 3.28). The study also revealed that ILC had a significant effect in curtailing the spread of COVID-19 fake news with a grand mean of 3.28 against the criterion mean of 2.5. It is implied that LIS undergraduates are educationally position to acquire ILC which is crucial to their identification of fake news and helps to curtail its spread.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in its use of online group for data elicitation within a limited period of three weeks. Also, in its adoption of self-evaluation scale to measure ILC instead of standard information literacy test. Also, the high chances of social desirability bias in sections C and E serve as a limitation to the study.

Practical implications

The study reinforces the need to enhance structures that flags fake news on social media platforms and integrating IL into schools’ curriculum at all levels.

Originality/value

This study seeks to pioneer a new area of focus on the relevance of ILC to different global issues that concern the health and well-being.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Zazli Lily Wisker

This study aims to explore how consumers process and respond to fake news on halal food in a Muslim-majority country. The study hypothesises that fake news that violates…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how consumers process and respond to fake news on halal food in a Muslim-majority country. The study hypothesises that fake news that violates one’s moral code could induce anger resulting in brand hate. Religiosity plays a role as a moderating variable for the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two studies using quasi-experiment repeated measures factorial design, 2 × 2 between subjects. In Study 1, 219 participated, whereas in Study 2, a total of 173 was recruited for the experiment. The study uses one-way repeated measures design ANOVA and MEMORE to test the effects of moderation for repeated measures.

Findings

The findings indicate that fake news that violates one’s moral code, belief and values could induce anger and brand hate. Religiosity moderates the relationship between anger and brand hate

Research limitations/implications

The study’s limitations include the limited dimension measured for religiosity and brand hate.

Originality/value

The study of brand hate as opposed to brand love is relatively scarce. This study has observed how fake news that violates one’s moral code is detrimental to the brand, which in turn induces hate. Marketing managers have to be cautious in marketing their products in more religious countries. Besides, they have to be proactive in combating fake news that might tarnish their brand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Katherine Hanz and Emily Sarah Kingsland

The purpose of this paper seeks to provide an in-depth overview of a series of fake news information literacy library workshops, which were offered 19 times over the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper seeks to provide an in-depth overview of a series of fake news information literacy library workshops, which were offered 19 times over the course of 2 years. It examines the results of a fake news game, which was played with a wide variety of audiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study examines workshops offered by two librarians at [name of institution], a major research institution in [city], [country]. It describes the workshops in detail and demonstrates how others may adopt this model.

Findings

The authors found that while high school students proved to be the most adept at recognizing fake news, the literature suggests that mere exposure to digital media is not sufficient in preparing Generation Z in their digital literacy critical assessment skills.

Practical implications

Library and information professionals are provided with the tools to adapt this workshop to suit the needs of their respective users.

Originality/value

This paper examines how a workshop can be adapted to seven unique audiences, spanning from high school students to university alumni. It incorporates the Association of College and Research Libraries framework and the latest literature into informing its practice.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Zifei Fay Chen and Yang Cheng

Drawing on theoretical insights from the persuasion knowledge model (PKM), this study aims to propose and test a model that maps out the antecedents, process and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on theoretical insights from the persuasion knowledge model (PKM), this study aims to propose and test a model that maps out the antecedents, process and consequences to explain how consumers process and respond to fake news about brands on Facebook.

Design/methodology/approach

Contextualizing the fake news about Coca-Cola’s recall of Dasani water, an online survey was conducted via Qualtrics with consumers in the USA (N  =  468). Data were analyzed using covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results showed that self-efficacy and media trust significantly predicted consumers’ persuasion knowledge of the fake news. Persuasion knowledge of the fake news significantly influenced consumers’ perceived diagnosticity of the fake news and subsequent brand trust. Furthermore, persuasion knowledge of the fake news mediated the effects from self-efficacy on perceived diagnosticity of the fake news and brand trust, respectively.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of brand management by examining how consumers process and respond to fake news about a brand. It also extends the persuasion knowledge model by applying it to the context of fake news about brands on social media, and incorporating antecedents (self-efficacy and media trust) and consequences (perceived diagnosticity and brand trust) of persuasion knowledge in this particular context. Practically, this study provides insights to key stakeholders of brands to better understand consumers’ information processing of fake news about brands on social media.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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