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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Millicent Adei Kotey, Faizal Adams, Fred Nimoh, James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah and Coleman Edwin

To help address the problem of imperfections in the performance of cowpea markets in Ghana, the study sought to understand the costs and benefits associated with different…

Abstract

Purpose

To help address the problem of imperfections in the performance of cowpea markets in Ghana, the study sought to understand the costs and benefits associated with different market outlets and factors influencing farmers' choice of these outlets.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage sampling technique was adopted to collect data from 300 cowpea farmers through purposive sampling of communities and simple random selection at the farmer level in Ejura Sekyedumasi municipality of Ghana. Analytical methods including profitability measures such as gross margin, net margin, return on investment and multinomial logistic (MNL) regression model were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results showed that production and marketing of cowpea is profitable with farmers who trade in wholesale markets recording the highest gross margin (Gh₵1245.85 (US$227.76)), net margin (Gh₵1029.37 (US$188.18)) and return on investment (ROI) of 63%. Important nonfarm-related factors including household size, farming experience, membership of farmer-based organization and extension contact were found to significantly influence the choice of marketing outlets in the study area. In addition, market attributes such as produce selling price, volume of cowpea sold and post-harvest value addition were also key determinants of cowpea market outlet choices.

Practical implications

The results of the study are vital to agricultural administrators in devising efficient cowpea market systems for smallholder farmers in Ghana. Likewise, the study provides important information to smallholder farmers in the choice of market outlets that maximizes their returns.

Originality/value

Previous studies on marketing of cowpea in Ghana emphasized on direct retail or consumer marketing to maximize farmers' returns. Meanwhile, there are claims to suggest that the sale of cowpea grains in the country are carried out through varied market outlets which come with differing costs and benefits implications for smallholder farmers. Therefore, the present study comprehensively compared associated costs and benefits in all available cowpea market outlets so as to settle the confusion surrounding most profitable and efficient marketing channel for smallholder farmers toward poverty reduction.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2022

Awura-Abena Amoah Osei, Seth Etuah, Robert Aidoo, Simon Cudjoe Fialor and Faizal Adams

The objectives of this paper are to analyze the drivers of smoked marine fish prices and examine the challenges along the value chain to inform policy.

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to analyze the drivers of smoked marine fish prices and examine the challenges along the value chain to inform policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on cross-sectional data from 158 fish smokers, 100 wholesalers, and 120 retailers in Ghana. The challenges faced by the actors along the chain are identified and ranked using Kendall's coefficient of concordance. The three-stage least square estimation approach is employed to control for endogeneity resulting from the simultaneous equations for prices of different fish types and their substitutes.

Findings

The results reveal that marketing experience, the extent of competition, price of substitutes, payment terms, and variable cost items, such as transportation cost and storage charges, are key determinants of smoked fish prices along the value chain. Lack of access to credit is the main constraint to the marketing of smoked marine fish, irrespective of the actor or the fish type.

Originality/value

Many studies have established the linkages between fish consumption, prices, and food security in the literature. However, there is a dearth of information on the responsiveness of fish prices to changes in the market and seller-specific factors to drive policy to stabilize prices along the value chain.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-09-2021-0566

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Amos Mensah, Maxwell Asiamah, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa, Faizal Adams, Seth Etuah, Eli Gaveh and Patrick Appiah

The paper aims to examine impact of adopted maize seed technology on farm profitability. It assesses both the revenue and cost implication of the adopted technology on…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine impact of adopted maize seed technology on farm profitability. It assesses both the revenue and cost implication of the adopted technology on farmers' welfare. The study aims to expand the domain of farm investment assessment analysis by including a broader range of production outcome indicators than is normally found in the adoption impact on farm profitability literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an empirical study using field survey data. A structured questionnaire was used to interview 400 maize farmers across four regions of Ghana. The survey was complemented with focus group discussions in each region with participants representing male and female farmers cultivating maize on a commercial basis. The data captured detail household level (i.e. demographic and socioeconomic characteristics) as well as farm-level information on maize production (i.e. input use and farm output).

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about maize farmers' perception on the adopted maize seed technology and the factors influencing adoption. It also shed light on the fact that maize farmers do not base their adoption decisions solely on farm output and revenue indicators alone, but mainly on the return on their investment and the cost associated with the maize seed technology adopted.

Research limitations/implications

Because of data limitation, the influence of some important actors (market power) could not be directly captured in the analysis; this may lead to over simplification of a very complex situation in the maize sector. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to future investigate the influence of such important phenomenon on farm profitability.

Social implications

Improving maize productivity and farm profitability across the sectors is important in order to improve farmer income. This study, therefore, highlights the effect of adopted seed technology and its impact on farm profitability.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how investment cost in maize seed technology affect farm profitability.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Comfort Love Naa Kwaale Quartey, James Osei Mensah, Fred Nimoh, Faizal Adams and Seth Etuah

The main purpose of this study was to assess constraints and determinants of pineapple farmers' choice of certification schemes in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study was to assess constraints and determinants of pineapple farmers' choice of certification schemes in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A multistage sampling method was used to solicit data from 345 pineapple farmers from Eastern and Central regions of Ghana. Analytical techniques including descriptive statistics, four-point Likert scale index and multinomial logistic regression model (MNL) were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The four-point scale index shows that high renewal fee for certification schemes is the most important constraint facing certified farmers before high labor cost of production. The MNL model shows that both off-farm income and age negatively influenced farmers' choice of GlobalG.A.P scheme. However, household size had significant positive influence on farmers' choice of GlobalG.A.P and Organic schemes. Likewise, formal education had significant positive relationship with the choice of Fairtrade and Organic certification schemes while farming experience positively influenced organic scheme choice. On the other hand, premium price and extension services positively influenced the likelihood of choosing all the three certification schemes. Lastly, regional dummy only negatively influences the choice of organic certification schemes.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature on certification schemes adopted by smallholder by analyzing the determinants and constraints of choice of scheme(s).

Originality/value

The study brings to bear the issues confronting smallholder pineapple farmers in the employment of certification schemes in developing countries, specifically Ghana.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Faizal Adams, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa and Edwin Coleman

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage sampling technique was used to collect data from 100 tomato farmers in Ghana. Analytical tools which include descriptive statistics, gross margin analysis (GM), profitability ratios and binary logit model were employed.

Findings

Profitability analysis indicates that farmers who supply to wholesalers have gross margin of Gh¢7.86 (US$1.67) per 25 kg crate, while farmers who supply to retailers recorded a major loss of Gh¢5.36 (US$1.14) per 25 kg crate. The result suggests that farmers selling to wholesalers are better off than farmers supplying to retailers. The binary logit regression analysis reveals a positive relationship between farmers' choice of marketing outlet (wholesaling) and age of respondents, quantity of tomato sold and cost of labor for production. A negative relationship also existed between farmers' choice of marketing outlet and weighted average selling price and household size.

Research limitations/implications

The results call for policy efforts to provide an enabling environment for more extension education and establishment of farmer associations to make marketing information for price development among farmers available.

Originality/value

The choice of marketing outlet greatly influences profitability of tomato production. This study examines the performance of the various tomato marketing outlets in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Iddrisu Yahaya, Fred A. Yamoah and Faizal Adams

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumer motivation and willingness to pay (WTP) for “safer” vegetables from the use of non-treatment options of wastewater use in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess consumer motivation and willingness to pay (WTP) for “safer” vegetables from the use of non-treatment options of wastewater use in urban/peri-urban vegetable production.

Design/methodology/approach

As a theoretical basis, consumer theory of maximizing utility being an indicator of individual preference was examined through choice experiment (CE) method to measure the WTP for value of safety within the context of health reduced risk (pathogen reduction) of illness. WTP was tested empirically using survey data from 650 households in the two largest cities in Ghana (Accra and Kumasi) that are characterized by a number of well-established vegetable producers who use wastewater in their production and a large urban and peri-urban vegetable consumer market.

Findings

Experience of vegetable borne diseases drives the need for safer vegetables and income and gender are key demographic factors influencing WTP. It was further found that consumers are willing to pay an average amount of GH¢ 4.7 ($2.40) per month for a technology change that would result in the production of “safer” vegetables.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding WTP offers insight into consumer concerns, behaviour and their readiness to pay for safer vegetable options. However, a further consideration of the impact of the combinations of the various non-treatment options on pathogen reduction and the assessment of the financial viability of each option will collectively ensure an efficient and cost-effective implementation of the technologies.

Practical implications

WTP insight gained has implications for vegetable production, marketing and public health policy. The understanding from the findings forms a solid basis to canvass for certification system for urban/peri urban vegetables. The information provided also helps to formulate effective public education on the safety of vegetables.

Originality/value

Measuring WTP for safer vegetables by Ghanaian urban/peri-urban consumers is novel. The CE approach is robust and the findings can inform vegetable production and marketing decisions as well as public health policy formulation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Donnie Adams, Ashley Ng Yoon Mooi and Vasu Muniandy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Malaysian National Professional Qualification for Educational Leaders (NPQEL), a principal leadership preparation programme and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Malaysian National Professional Qualification for Educational Leaders (NPQEL), a principal leadership preparation programme and the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025, a comprehensive plan for a rapid and sustainable transformation of our education system through to 2025 to ensure high-performing school leaders in every school.

Design/methodology/approach

In understanding how the NPQEL operates and its effectiveness in preparing high performing school leaders, a research instrument of open-ended questions were administered to 102 principals from government-funded secondary schools, to establish how they were prepared for their leadership roles and their views of their leadership practices.

Findings

The NPQEL programme provides evidence of strong outcomes in preparing school leaders towards high-performing school leadership in Malaysia in combination of a variety of approaches with respect to its designs and competency standards. Findings indicate that the NPQEL contributes towards the development of the school leaders' attributes or skills for their leadership roles; and the NPQEL fulfils the aspirations set out in the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025.

Originality/value

This paper explores the potential influence of Malaysian NPQEL and the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013–2025 on preparing high-performing school leaders in every school.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Theresia Woro Damayanti and Supramono Supramono

The study aims to empirically analyze the effects of the presence of female top managers and owners on corporate tax compliance.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to empirically analyze the effects of the presence of female top managers and owners on corporate tax compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for analysis were sourced from the World Bank Enterprise Surveys that involved 23,178 private firms in 98 countries. The surveys used a stratified random sampling method by using three criteria, namely, firm size, business sector and geographic region, within each country. Further, data are analyzed using the ordinal logistic regression and supported by the marginal effect analysis.

Findings

The results show that the presence of female top managers and owners is a significant factor that underlies the firm-level tax compliance difference when firms exhibit relatively lower compliance.

Practical implications

Although this study shows that the determinants of corporate tax compliance are very complex, there are also crucial roles of top managers and owners' gender. This study advises firms to use the gender equality strategy to generate the best human capital, especially in their top management levels. Besides, this study can be helpful in designing policies that facilitate women to reach top managerial levels or to own businesses as an alternative method to enhance tax compliance for developing countries that fail to generate optimal corporate income tax revenues.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no previous studies examine the effects of the presence of female top managers and business owners on firms’ tax compliance policies. This study contributes to extend the understanding of the important role of women in corporate strategic decision-making, especially in taxation policies in various developing countries.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Zarina Waheed, Sufean Hussin and Megat Ahmad Kamaluddin Bin Megat Daud

The purpose of this paper is to explore the best practices of school leaders, teachers, pupils, parents and the community in selected transformed schools in Selangor, Malaysia.

1022

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the best practices of school leaders, teachers, pupils, parents and the community in selected transformed schools in Selangor, Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative multiple-case study explores the best practices in two selected transformed schools through in-depth interviews, observations and document reviews. The data were collected from 2 school heads, 6 teachers with administrative responsibilities and 20 teachers. The themes were elucidated via open, axial and selective coding based on the grounded theory approach.

Findings

The analysis identified various best practices exhibited by school leaders, teachers, pupils, parents and the community. Four themes were found to be common as best practices in both selected schools, which were adaptive and multi-dimensional leadership, winning-the-hearts, extensive use of Information and Communication Technology in school operations, and a culture of acquiring and sharing professional knowledge. The unique theme for School A was the emphasis on the social, emotional and ethical well-being of the students, while extensive parental involvement and support was a unique theme identified in School B.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper may be used as guidance tool for policy makers and educational planners regarding school transformation in Malaysia, and as well as in other countries. Such practices can be learned, adapted and replicated by other schools in order to transform. The findings also have direct implications to current teachers, school leaders, parents and the community.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of research on the best practices and school transformation in Malaysian transformed schools. There is a decisive need to explore the best practices of transformed schools in Malaysia based on their own cultural and contextual needs in order to help schools that aspire for transformation.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Shahriar Kabir, Syed Shams and Roger Lawrey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between trade diversion risk and new Halal market exploration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between trade diversion risk and new Halal market exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes the Halal trade flows for Malaysia’s top 11 halal food/food-related commodities from 1967 to 2018 by relying on co-integration and auto-regression techniques.

Findings

This paper determines that the greater the country’s current comparative advantage in an exported good, the higher the risk of export diversion between the Halal and conventional markets. The diversion risk, however, disappears with a lower current comparative advantage.

Practical implications

To take advantage of the fast-emerging Halal market, a country should expand export of commodities with relatively low current comparative advantage but high demand in the target market, along with supportive trade policies to build competitiveness in the long term.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the literature by investigating if the theory of comparative advantage can predict the market diversification risk that may arise from the expansion of exports to the Halal market occurring alongside existing exports to the conventional market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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