Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Madeleine Power, Neil Small, Bob Doherty, Barbara Stewart-Knox and Kate E. Pickett

This paper uses data from a city with a multi-ethnic, multi-faith population to better understand faith-based food aid. The paper aims to understand what constitutes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses data from a city with a multi-ethnic, multi-faith population to better understand faith-based food aid. The paper aims to understand what constitutes faith-based responses to food insecurity, compare the prevalence and nature of faith-based food aid across different religions and explore how community food aid meets the needs of a multi-ethnic, multi-faith population.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved two phases of primary research. In Phase 1, desk-based research and dialogue with stakeholders in local food security programmes were used to identify faith-based responses to food insecurity. Phase 2 consisted of 18 semi-structured interviews involving faith-based and secular charitable food aid organizations.

Findings

The paper illustrates the internal heterogeneity of faith-based food aid. Faith-based food aid is highly prevalent and the vast majority is Christian. Doctrine is a key motivation among Christian organizations for their provision of food. The fact that the clients at faith-based, particularly Christian, food aid did not reflect the local religious demographic is a cause for concern in light of the entry-barriers identified. This concern is heightened by the co-option of faith-based organizations by the state as part of the “Big Society” agenda.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study in the UK to look at the faith-based arrangements of Christian and Muslim food aid providers, to set out what it means to provide faith-based food aid in the UK and to explore how faith-based food aid interacts with people of other religions and no religion.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Richard L. Wood and Mark R. Warren

Questions whether, in the USA, faith‐based communities can have an important effect on politics. Contends that other areas, where there are poorer communities, are more…

Abstract

Questions whether, in the USA, faith‐based communities can have an important effect on politics. Contends that other areas, where there are poorer communities, are more likely to be influenced politically in civil society although does not preclude other income sectors from being similarly affected just that deprived areas are more likely to listen to faith‐based organizers.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Lynnaia Main

This chapter, based on a keynote presentation at the Moana: Water of Life conference at the University of Lincoln, UK, in August 2019, explores how individual people of…

Abstract

This chapter, based on a keynote presentation at the Moana: Water of Life conference at the University of Lincoln, UK, in August 2019, explores how individual people of faith, and faith actors, engage with the confluence of member states, UN entities, and civil society that make up the UN system, in order to address climate change and water, informally and formally. Interviews with faith-based organizations, UN entities, and UN ambassadors revealed lessons learned on the successes, challenges, and obstacles in engaging with the UN on climate action. Drawing from this research, the author revealed some “lessons learned” in order to respond to a key question: How can faith-based participants engage with the United Nations (UN) on climate action in smart, strategic ways in an era of climate emergency? The research aims to equip the readers with a sense of the urgency of climate action and an appreciation of their own agency and action and practical tools for using their faith in climate action with the UN.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Gilbert A. Jacobs and James A. Polito

The results from this qualitative study suggest that CEOs of Faith-Based Nonprofit Organizations (FBNPOs) define and measure their organization's effectiveness primarily…

Abstract

The results from this qualitative study suggest that CEOs of Faith-Based Nonprofit Organizations (FBNPOs) define and measure their organization's effectiveness primarily based on the outcomes achieved in meeting the immediate needs of their clients and in resolving root causes to those needs. Other indicators of organizational effectiveness- including financial reports, amount of services provided, client satisfaction, stake holder support and perceptions -were also used by the CEOs of FBNPOs to measure organizational effectiveness. The findings indicate that faith is the source of “why” and “how” these FBNPOs conduct their activities. Measuring the impact faith has on those whom they serve varies among the FBNPOs in this study along a continuum of not being measured to being intentionally measured.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Lisa Ruth Oakley, Lee-Ann Fenge, Simon Bass and Justin Humphreys

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a study exploring the understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding within Christian faith-based settings…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a study exploring the understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding within Christian faith-based settings. The paper concludes with recommendations for practitioners involved in safeguarding adults in faith-based Christian settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers a survey (n=3,182) into understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding for individuals who attend Church regularly or work in a Christian organisation

Findings

This study is the first to be undertaken with a UK sample and highlights a range of factors informing adult safeguarding practice within Christian organisations. This includes: complexity linked to understanding vulnerability and its role in safeguarding activity; lack of clarity about what to do with a safeguarding adult concern; and the need for safeguarding training pertinent to the particular needs of faith-based settings.

Research limitations/implications

As there is currently a dearth of research in this area this paper makes a valuable contribution to the developing knowledge base around safeguarding and vulnerability within faith-based organisations.

Practical implications

Professionals need to develop increased understanding of the complexities involved in safeguarding activity, and specifically how those working in the wider context of supporting vulnerable adults make sense of safeguarding processes and procedures.

Social implications

It is important that all organisations, including faith-based settings, working with adults have an understanding of their roles and responsibilities with respect to safeguarding those at risk of harm.

Originality/value

This paper is the first UK study to consider safeguarding adults at risk of harm in Christian faith contexts.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Jan Michael Alexandre C. Bernadas, Carlos M. Piocos III and Ron Bridget T. Vilog

Informed by health activism (Zoller, 2005), the purpose of this paper is to explore the communicative processes of organizations working with women migrants in countries…

Abstract

Purpose

Informed by health activism (Zoller, 2005), the purpose of this paper is to explore the communicative processes of organizations working with women migrants in countries of destination. In particular, it explored the definitions of and explanations for health of organizations, their solutions to disease and illness, as well as, the methods and tactics they use to communicate health.

Design/methodology/approach

It employed qualitative approach specifically in-depth interviews with leaders or core members of not-for-profit and faith-based organizations working with Filipina migrants in Japan. Field notes from participant observations in formal meetings and informal gatherings were likewise used as data sources.

Findings

While organizations also recognized physical and spiritual health, they placed strong emphasis on mental well-being. Other than translation service, pastoral care, and shelter, coordinating with other not-for-profit and faith-based organizations, international centers, and governments was solution for addressing illness and disease. Together with face-to-face, digital media were used as method and tactic to communicate within and outside organizations. It likewise found that the organizations included were inclusive such that they also worked with other Filipinos in Japan.

Originality/value

This paper contributed to migration health literature by discussing the central role of organizations for mental well-being activism, favorable consequences of coordination among organizations to promote access to quality healthcare and information and dual characterization of digital media for organizing publics. Overall, it is one of the few to explore the ways into which organizations communicatively challenge health structures in countries of destination.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Marshal H. Wright, Mihai C. Bocarnea and Julie K. Huntley

This study examined donor development processes in a faithbased, 501(c)(3) publicly-supported, tax-exempt organizational setting. The conceptual framework is relationship…

Abstract

This study examined donor development processes in a faithbased, 501(c)(3) publicly-supported, tax-exempt organizational setting. The conceptual framework is relationship marketing theory as informed from a systems theory alignment perspective. Organization-public relationship (OPR) dynamically predicts donor willingness to contribute unrestricted funds. It is proffered that the discrepancy variable, “values-fit incongruence,” significantly affects this dynamic. This contention is explored by asking the following two questions: (a) does donor-organization values-fit incongruence significantly negatively predict donor willingness to contribute unrestricted funds, and b) is the OPR construct strengthened with the patent inclusion of values-fit incongruence as an interactive moderator variable. Results suggest values-fit incongruence significantly negatively predicts donor willingness to contribute unrestricted funds. The results also suggest the OPR model is not strengthened by patently including the values-fit incongruence variable, as it may already be latently accounted for.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2016

Minjeong Kang

Volunteers are often crucial components to many nonprofit organizations as their financial resources continue to decline. Volunteer activities in the nonprofit sector…

Abstract

Purpose

Volunteers are often crucial components to many nonprofit organizations as their financial resources continue to decline. Volunteer activities in the nonprofit sector provide a broad range of services from administrative support (24%) such as fundraising and office work to providing social service and care (20%) such as preparing and delivering food, teaching or counseling. The purpose of this study was to examine the influences of important factors in creating volunteers’ engagement with nonprofit organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of the proposed survey was volunteers of a faith-based nonprofit organization in the Northeast region of United States. The organization is a synod that oversees more than 1,000 Presbyterian churches over eight states in the Northeast region of the United States. The primary focus of its mission is prison ministry that aims to help imprisoned immigrants and their families with legal and other necessary supports. With help from the organization’s management, the researcher sent out an online survey to 1,973 eligible volunteers, with response rate of 29.90 percent (AAPOR RR1). This resulted in a total sample size of 590 volunteers who completed the survey.

Findings

This study found that, when the level of identification was higher, the influence of satisfaction on affective commitment became greater. Therefore, for this nonprofit organization that heavily relies on volunteer support, it is important to establish and maintain a mutually agreeable identification with its volunteers to foster volunteer engagement. Volunteer-organization identification seemed particularly crucial for volunteers to be empowered and to become actively involved with the case organization. Also, when individual volunteers identified themselves with the nonprofit organization, there was a greater influence of satisfaction with the organization on their engagement in their voluntary work.

Research limitations/implications

This study findings suggest that for a nonprofit organization that heavily relies on volunteer support, it is important to establish and maintain a mutually agreeable identification with its volunteers to foster volunteer engagement. Volunteer-organization identification seemed particularly crucial for volunteers to be empowered and to become actively involved with the case organization. Due to the exploratory nature of the study with the survey data from a single nonprofit organization, the application of the research findings beyond the scope of this study should be made cautiously. Especially, given various kinds of nonprofit organizations, the specific context of this study’s nonprofit organization (i.e., faith-based charity organization) would limit the general application of research findings.

Practical implications

This study also suggests a sound measure of volunteer engagement. For management of volunteer engagement, the suggested measurement system can be helpful for management of nonprofit organizations and further research in nonprofit public relations.

Originality/value

Extra-role behaviors and organizational citizenship behaviors have been identified as manifest characteristics of both employee and customer engagement and this link has yet to be explored in the nonprofit sector for volunteering and cause advocating behaviors. The current study adopts engagement as an important motivational variable to understand volunteer motivations and suggests satisfaction with nonprofit organization management and volunteer-organization identification as important antecedents to volunteer engagement.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Chad B. Newswander and Lynita K. Newswander

A careful study demonstrates that President Bush has implemented the faith-based initiative as a method of governmentality, one which appears to be biased toward…

Abstract

A careful study demonstrates that President Bush has implemented the faith-based initiative as a method of governmentality, one which appears to be biased toward Christianity. This paper examines the definition of Foucaultʼs governmentality as it relates to the ever-expanding structure of contemporary American governance and justifies the categorization of faith-based initiatives as an example of pastoral power. Ultimately, these arguments characterize the current state of governmentality as “born-again,” and call specific attention to what appears to be a strong affiliation of “charitable choice” with evangelical Christianity. By relying on evangelical Christianity to govern, the pastoral-panopticon coupled with governmental resources has brought back an older method of regulation which is less obvious in its intrusion, and more dangerous for it.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Chris Bart

This paper seeks to determine whether significant differences exist between secular and faith‐based hospitals in terms of specific mission statement components and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to determine whether significant differences exist between secular and faith‐based hospitals in terms of specific mission statement components and mission‐related performance variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 130 top managers from a sample of 515 Canadian hospitals responded to a comprehensive questionnaire investigating 23 mission statement components and seven mission performance outcome measures. Data were analyzed using frequency analysis, one‐way analysis of variance, MANOVA, chi‐squared and Mann‐Whitney U tests.

Findings

The analysis showed that differences in mission content exist between different types of hospitals, and that these differences form a pattern of sorts within each type. It was also found that faith‐based hospitals out‐perform their secular counterparts in many ways.

Research limitations/implications

The research and its findings are limited in their application to relatively large Canadian health care organizations and the responses/opinions given by managers from a hospital's senior echelons.

Practical implications

The results have implications for all health care organizations interested in improving the results in their mission performance scorecard. The findings both confirm the impact that mission statements can have on selected hospital performance indicators and demonstrate that faith‐based hospitals have been more diligent in taking advantage of them.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to show that specific and significant differences exist between the mission statements of secular and faith‐based hospitals and that those differences are associated with hospital performance. These findings will be of special interest to senior hospital administrators and “directors of mission” within faith‐based institutions.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000