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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Latisha Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

The findings provide information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Judith A. Downie

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction. Increased accessibility to government information through the internet is bringing all librarians into increased contact with government information, thereby becoming ad hoc documents librarians. Through collaboration with experts in government information, shared knowledge results in opportunities for richer and more comprehensive information literacy instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

This review examines evidence of commonality and collaboration between librarians through content analysis of both general and specialized library publications.

Findings

Collaboration is a common practice in library instruction to share workload and expertise, yet most literature on this practice focuses on librarian‐faculty collaborative efforts. Limited evidence exists for collaboration between librarians and a severely limited body of literature exists when examining instructional design collaboration to include government information in information literacy instruction.

Practical implications

Collaborative instruction proactively addresses resolving perceived barriers and expands instruction resource repertoires and shares workloads.

Originality/value

Examination of the collaborative process between librarians is infrequent. This adds to the body of literature and increases awareness of additional resources in the provision of information literacy instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Sean Swanick and Jennifer Garland

Purpose: As collection development in research libraries becomes increasingly homogeneous and “e-preferred”, it is our heritage collections that differentiate us and…

Abstract

Purpose

Purpose: As collection development in research libraries becomes increasingly homogeneous and “e-preferred”, it is our heritage collections that differentiate us and anchor the physical presence of our institutions. These valuable heritage resources, vital for teaching, researching, and learning are unfortunately too often inaccessible, uncatalogued, and ultimately undiscoverable. This paper focuses on the curation of special collections as a means of exposing hidden collections and discusses practical steps undertaken to highlight unique print materials in the digital age.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study describes the transformation of a hidden collection into a teaching collection through the exhibition of uncatalogued Islamic manuscripts, their associated digital component and the resulting faculty–librarian collaboration.

Findings

By sharing print collections through exhibitions with an associated digital component, we are both increasing the visibility of, and improving access to the material.

Originality/value

This case study outlines a successful approach to exposing hidden collections to support an innovative teaching and learning environment.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Raymond Pun

This paper aims to explore the library’s on-going relationship with the academic resource center (ARC), and how over the past two years, there have been new services and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the library’s on-going relationship with the academic resource center (ARC), and how over the past two years, there have been new services and programs thriving as a result of this collaboration. The paper presents three case studies that demonstrate the library’s collaboration with the ARC and assesses the opportunities and challenges in working with this department in a new university.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this paper is to explore three case studies on how the library collaborated with the ARC in supporting students. The case studies explore the opportunities for partnerships in developing innovative services, programs and resources. Librarians are integral members of the ARC and are embedded in this community by providing support to the department as well.

Findings

The paper finds that collaborations between the library and the ARC are mutually beneficial: academic libraries may consider partnering with tutoring centers to create synergies in enhancing the students’ research experience. However, not all collaborative projects or programs are successful or repeatable in success. They are still opportunities to build and strengthen the relationship between the library and the ARC.

Originality/value

This paper presents three case studies on how the library works closely with the “Global Academic Fellows” (GAF) from the ARC. The GAFs work closely with faculty and librarians as they teach, tutor and collaborate with different university departments to create programs or initiatives that enrich the student experience and the university. Their roles have been instrumental in collaborating with the library to create innovative programs, events and support services throughout the two years since the university opened in 2013.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Tim Harper and Barbara P. Norelli

Strategic business partnerships inform business faculty‐librarian (BFL) collaborations. This paper seeks to address how the motivations for business partnerships and…

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic business partnerships inform business faculty‐librarian (BFL) collaborations. This paper seeks to address how the motivations for business partnerships and faculty‐librarian collaborations are similar. A conceptual model suggests that the depth of the BFL relationship significantly enhances electronic collection development outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature concerning strategic business alliances, faculty‐librarian collaborations, and collection development was examined to determine whether principles that are applied to strategic business alliances can also be applied to BFL collaborations. A case‐in‐point is included for illustration.

Findings

Specific principles of strategic business partnerships can be applied to BFL collaborations aimed at improving electronic collection development. In addition, driving forces such as assessment, communication, and technology influence the nature of alliances across the business and academic arenas.

Originality/value

The findings are significant because they demonstrate how BFL collaborations can be made more effective through the application of business principles. BFL collaborations can positively influence electronic collection development in a variety of ways. The paper offers a new and unique conceptual model that improves understanding of the nature and depth of BFL collaborations in the context of electronic collection development. This paper will be of interest to business faculty in particular and faculty in general, and librarians working in diverse library settings, especially librarians aligned with management and business departments. Librarians in management positions will likely find this information useful as a means to increase faculty‐librarian collaboration across all disciplines.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Ti Yu

The purpose of this paper is to show how the library at Jinwen University of Science and Technology (JUST) in Taiwan introduced the use of a new model “Faculty member as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the library at Jinwen University of Science and Technology (JUST) in Taiwan introduced the use of a new model “Faculty member as library specialist”. This is done in an attempt to determine the value of a new approach of faculty‐librarian collaboration for promoting the library's resources and services. In addition, some ideas and suggestions are proposed regarding the issue of faculty‐librarian collaboration for library staff around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

After providing some background information regarding the JUST Library, the process of the project implementation and the approaches used are described in detail. In addition, the effectiveness of the project is reviewed based on the results of the interviews with some of the teaching faculty and the statistics reports of the usage of the JUST Library from 2006 to 2008. Finally, some conclusions are drawn and some suggestions are made, proposing that the library staff establish a faculty‐librarian collaborative model.

Findings

After reviewing the effectiveness of the project, it is hard to say whether or not it is the best way to promote the library's services and resources. However, the paper finds that the proposed approach provides a new idea and an example of faculty‐librarian collaboration in promoting the library's resources and services to the students.

Originality/value

Hopefully the model of faculty‐librarian collaboration in the JUST Library in Taiwan will provide some new ideas and inspirations that can be shared with library staff around the world.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sara Maurice Whitver

Library literature is filled with studies that lament the challenges of the faculty–librarian relationship. While many examples of productive collaborations can be found…

Abstract

Purpose

Library literature is filled with studies that lament the challenges of the faculty–librarian relationship. While many examples of productive collaborations can be found in recent literature, librarians still find it challenging on the local level to reshape old perceptions of the role of the librarian. This purpose of this paper is to suggest that by building relationships with graduate student teachers during their first semester of teaching, many of those challenges can be reversed.

Design/methodology/approach

The author describes her work with a writing program teaching practicum, a 1-h course for graduate students in the department of English who are engaged in teaching for the first time.

Findings

This paper offers a model for building collaborative relationships with graduate students who are first-time teachers of writing to support the development of information literacy in their teaching practices. Using the community-building principles of Writing Across the Disciplines and the collaboration initiatives referenced in writing program literature, librarians can establish peer relationships with first-time teachers, which can have long-lasting effects on faculty–librarian relationships, as those teachers continue to teach throughout their career.

Originality/value

Many articles exist that talk about faculty–librarian collaborations, but virtually none have explored the role of librarian collaborations with first-time teachers or, by extension, with graduate student teachers in general. This paper offers one model for establishing a productive role for the librarian within first-year writing courses while also empowering first-time teachers to successfully design and implement researched writing assignments.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Latisha Reynolds, Amber Willenborg, Samantha McClellan, Rosalinda Hernandez Linares and Elizabeth Alison Sterner

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2016.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Thomas H. Cunningham and Scott Lanning

Information literacy is essential for successful expeditions into the ever‐expanding knowledge frontier. Faculty and librarians can guide each other, and the learners they…

Abstract

Information literacy is essential for successful expeditions into the ever‐expanding knowledge frontier. Faculty and librarians can guide each other, and the learners they serve, past wastelands to fertile soil and reliable wells to sustain inquiry and cultivate deeper understanding in their fields of study. The authors present definitions of information literacy, describe challenges in promoting it, and offer possible solutions for promoting faculty‐librarian collaboration on information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Irene Doskatsch

Many Australian universities have identified information literacy as a required graduate quality. As the scope of resources on which student learning is based expands, the…

Abstract

Many Australian universities have identified information literacy as a required graduate quality. As the scope of resources on which student learning is based expands, the definition of educator is broadening and requires the involvement of a range of non‐academic professional staff in the educational process. Information literacy‐related activities largely define the educative role of the librarian and forge faculty‐librarian partnerships. The paper is based on the premise that collaboration between librarians and other educators is the key to the integration of information literacy within the total educational process. The author draws on both personal experience and that of Australian colleagues to examine the faculty‐librarian relationship, explore the contentious territories of professional credibility and identity, and analyze changes in Australian higher education that impact on the educative role of librarians.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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