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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Firdaus Basbeth, Roselina Ahmad Saufi and Khaeruddin Bin Sudharmin

Assessing the impact of hygiene factors on faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching will advance the literature. It will especially demystify that both…

Abstract

Purpose

Assessing the impact of hygiene factors on faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching will advance the literature. It will especially demystify that both factors (hygiene factors and motivator) can cause job satisfaction in online education. The purpose of this paper is to firstly determine the level of faculty motivation and satisfaction in online teaching. Secondly, this study analyses the extent to which hygiene factors affect motivation and faculty satisfaction with online teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of this study consists of university faculty in Indonesia and Malaysia. The sample is randomly chosen in 50 higher education institutions in Indonesia and Malaysia. The sample size is 206. The participants completed a survey, including perceived student engagement, institutional support, motivation, faculty satisfaction and demographical questions. To test the model, PLS-SEM was used using SmartPLS3 software. The hygiene factors construct was operationalized as a second-order construct consisting of first-order construct: student engagement and institutional support.

Findings

There were no statistically significant differences concerning institutional support and motivation by country of residence. However, there were significant differences in student engagement and faculty satisfaction by country residence. Concerning satisfaction and motivation, the most satisfied and motivated was the faculty member in Indonesia. Hygiene factors were found as the antecedent to faculty motivation and faculty motivation multiplying hygiene factors' effect on job satisfaction. The results showed that student engagement has the highest impact on faculty satisfaction, followed by motivation. Work motivation mediates the relationship between hygiene factors and faculty satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study has limitations; firstly, causal inferences are not warranted as the data is cross-sectional. However, a future direction is to analyse the causal relationship between the hygiene factors, and motivation factors on faculty satisfaction using a formative first-order construct through a longitudinal study. Secondly, the results’ generalizability is another limitation of this study because the sample comprised only Indonesia and Malaysia faculty across 51 higher education institution in big cities in the island of Java in Indonesia and Malaysia peninsular only; however, the factors determined in this study represent the job-related aspects taken from the literature and the researchers’ experiences; other parts influence faculty satisfaction with online teaching. Therefore, identifying other elements is a future path.

Practical implications

When managers aim at increasing faculty satisfaction, the priority should be given to improve the performance of indicators with the highest effect but a relatively low in performance. All of this implies that higher education institution first needs to find ways to increase motivation by rewarding faculty in many forms, and improve the quality of instruction. Secondly, implementing policies and make some decisions that require an investment such as providing a learning management system.

Social implications

Indonesia and Malaysia higher education institutions may ameliorate faculty satisfaction with online teaching in several ways. Firstly, before the online course begins, higher education institutions should attempt to have faculty believe teaching online is worthwhile and understand the institution itself also believes it is significant. Administer training for faculty, especially regarding increasing connections with and between students, gives faculty the time needed to design an online course and provide faculty with a course management system with multiple capabilities. Secondly, during the online course, higher education institutions should support technical issues and try to have faculty believe they have an accommodating work schedule and independence with the online course.

Originality/value

This research firstly contributes to the literature by establishing the relationship between hygiene factors and motivation, and hygiene factors and satisfaction, which did not exist according to the two-factor theory in the past. Secondly, the authors provide evidence of motivation constructs as a mediating variable. Thirdly, this study broadens the literature scope by including faculty in two countries (Indonesia and Malaysia). It includes faculty from 51 higher education systems (e.g. public and private four-year universities), incudes graduate school in seven big cities in two countries, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Christine Victorino, Karen Nylund-Gibson and Sharon Conley

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the relationship between college and university faculty collegiality, conceptualized as a set of prosocial behaviors, and job satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the relationship between college and university faculty collegiality, conceptualized as a set of prosocial behaviors, and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-level structural equation model was developed to examine the relationship between faculty collegiality and job satisfaction at the individual and institutional levels, the effects of gender and race/ethnicity, the effect of institutional type (i.e. research universities vs non-research universities), and whether institutional-level perceptions of faculty collegiality and job satisfaction influence perceptions of faculty collegiality and job satisfaction at the individual level.

Findings

Faculty collegiality was highly and significantly related to job satisfaction at the individual level (0.86) and at the institutional level (0.93). At the individual level, pretenured women faculty and faculty of color indicated significantly lower levels of collegiality. At the institutional level, pretenured faculty interactions with tenured faculty colleagues were positively and significantly related to individual-level perceptions of faculty collegiality.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include self-report data that were dependent upon accurate responses from faculty participants, and cross-sectional data. Future analyses could extend study findings by examining the influence of faculty collegiality upon such outcomes as faculty productivity and retention in future multi-level analyses.

Practical implications

It is recommended that interventions be undertaken to embed prosocial behaviors into faculty research, teaching, and service activities, and to foster relationships between pretenured and tenured faculty members.

Originality/value

This paper underscores the importance of collecting nationally representative faculty data and conducting rigorous multi-level analyses to inform higher education policy and practice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Raimonda Alonderiene and Modesta Majauskaite

Although leadership is found to have impact on the followers’ attitudes and performance there is a gap in leadership studies in HEIs, especially having Lithuania in mind…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although leadership is found to have impact on the followers’ attitudes and performance there is a gap in leadership studies in HEIs, especially having Lithuania in mind. The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of leadership style on job satisfaction of faculty in higher education institutions (HEI).

Design/methodology/approach

In order to investigate before mentioned problem, the representative quantitative empirical research was conducted in 2013. It includes 72 faculty members and ten supervisors from Lithuanian public and private universities. The survey was conducted to check how leadership styles of supervisors influence faculty job satisfaction and compare the opinion of supervisors and subordinates.

Findings

The empirical research revealed significant positive impact of leadership style on job satisfaction of faculty where servant leadership style has been found to have the highest positive significant impact on job satisfaction of faculty while controlling autocrat leadership style has the lowest impact.

Research limitations/implications

There are several implications for further research. It can be expanded whether geographically (e.g. comparative analysis in different countries) or institutionally (e.g. in other educational institutions, such as schools or pre-schools).

Practical implications

Practical implications reveal that supervisors have the power to increase the levels of job satisfaction of their faculty members, by defining their role as a leader, demonstrating certain leadership behaviors.

Originality/value

This survey covers the area which lacks academic research, namely, the impact of leadership on HEI faculty. Previous leadership studies in HEI focus on particular leadership style demonstrated (van Ameijde, 2009), the impact of leadership on culture (Asmawi et al., 2013), organizational effectiveness (Siddique et al., 2011) and other factors. However, very few of them (one of the examples is the study of Webb, 2009 in USA) investigate the direct managers’ leadership style and faculty job satisfaction. Besides, the previous surveys have not covered as many leadership styles as this one does.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Kornelija Petr Balog and Bernardica Plašćak

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the customer satisfaction survey of the Faculty of Philosophy in Osijek Library. The purpose of the survey was to…

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1502

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the customer satisfaction survey of the Faculty of Philosophy in Osijek Library. The purpose of the survey was to determine the level of satisfaction among two customer groups: students and faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology utilised was a five‐page satisfaction questionnaire.

Findings

This paper presents the findings of the first customer satisfaction survey of the Faculty of Philosophy in Osijek Library. The satisfaction data are collected as a part of a wider library evaluation program and present the first step in future continuous measurement of customers’ expectations and their satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The structure and the size of the sample do not secure the representativeness. Among the student population, the paper was distributed only to those who visited the library, which, in a way, reduces the validity of the sample (those who are dissatisfied with library services may avoid the library). Among the faculty, the survey was distributed via e‐mail, but some faculty members do not check their e‐mail accounts regularly (or not at all).

Originality/value

This is the first measurement of customer satisfaction for the Faculty of Philosophy in Osijek Library. Furthermore, there are only a few similar papers that report on research in Croatian libraries in international literature.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Ahmed Al Kuwaiti, Hasan Ali Bicak and Saeed Wahass

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction among faculty members of the health sciences program at a Saudi higher education institution; and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction among faculty members of the health sciences program at a Saudi higher education institution; and predict the influence of various factors on overall job satisfaction. However, this study is quite different since it intended to evaluate the level of job satisfaction of faculty members using a self-structured questionnaire and ascertained the various factors influencing the overall job satisfaction of Saudi academics.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study design was adopted and Academic Job Satisfaction (AJS) survey was administered to 943 faculty members of the health sciences program through an online system. A total of 850 faculty members responded to 47 items and one global rating item (overall job satisfaction) using a five-point ordinal scale.

Findings

The level of job satisfaction of health sciences’ faculty members on all dimensions of AJS is observed to be high (>3.5) except salary, which is shown as medium (2.5–3.49). Regression analysis indicates the factors other than Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU) administrative policies and interpersonal relationships are significant predictors of overall job satisfaction; and salary is the most significant predictor of overall job satisfaction among health sciences’ faculty members.

Originality/value

This study adds a value to the existing literature by exploring the factors influencing job satisfaction of health sciences’ faculty members working in Saudi Universities. This would aid policy makers to focus on these factors, thereby improve and maintain job satisfaction among healthcare academics.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Elizabeth Klainot-Hess

Over the past several decades, there has been a growth in nonstandard professional work. One area where this can be seen is the academy, where tenure-track positions are…

Abstract

Over the past several decades, there has been a growth in nonstandard professional work. One area where this can be seen is the academy, where tenure-track positions are being replaced by non-tenure-track (NTT) positions such as adjuncts and lecturers. Studies of nonstandard professional workers have found significant variation in job satisfaction, and this is also true for NTT faculty. Why is job satisfaction among NTT faculty so variable, and how can we understand it? Drawing on in-depth interviews with one hundred NTT faculty at two large public research universities, the author argues that NTT faculty vary in two important ways: the role of the income from their NTT job in their family and their pathway to the NTT position. The author develops a typology of NTT faculty based on these two dimensions and argues that these two dimensions intersect in important ways that affect the job satisfaction and job experiences of NTT faculty. The only group of NTT faculty that experiences high job satisfaction are those who prefer a NTT position over a tenure-track one, and who do not rely on the income from this job as the primary source of income for their family. This research has implications for understanding the job satisfaction of other nonstandard professional workers, who may vary in similar ways.

Details

Professional Work: Knowledge, Power and Social Inequalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-210-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ghaleb Awad El Refae, Abdoulaye Kaba and Shorouq Eletter

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the…

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5058

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the spread of Coronavirus or COVID-19. The paper attempted to understand faculty and students’ satisfaction with institutional readiness for distance learning and perception towards opportunities and challenges of distance learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data collected in March 2020 through an online survey questionnaire from the participants (students = 445, faculty members = 139). The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) was used in formulating a conceptual framework. The collected data were analysed using several statistical techniques and partial least square structural equation modelling, to test and verify hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that, although faculty members and students expressed high satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning and believed in its opportunities and advantages, they expressed concerns about the challenges facing distance learning. Findings of the study indicated a relationship between the status or college of the participant and perceived opportunities and advantages of distance learning. Hypotheses testing supported the study framework and UTAUT theory by identifying and confirming the impact of perceived opportunities of distance learning on satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning.

Originality/value

The study suggested that non-distance learning institutions should keep offering courses through distance learning to prevent any shortcomings in the future.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Heidi Reeder

Without the stability of tenure, adjunct faculty have few barriers to leave their position. The purpose of this article is to understand the variables that predict…

Abstract

Purpose

Without the stability of tenure, adjunct faculty have few barriers to leave their position. The purpose of this article is to understand the variables that predict commitment among adjunct instructors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper statistically analyzed data from a survey completed by adjunct instructors at two 4-year universities. The survey included scales on commitment, satisfaction, investments, alternatives and the psychological concepts of grit and self-efficacy. In addition, a qualitative analysis was conducted on supplemental open-ended questions that allowed participants to describe the basis of their commitment.

Findings

Satisfaction and investments were the main predictors of commitment and those together accounted for just over 50 percent of the variance. Grit and self-efficacy did not correlate with commitment, but did correlate with satisfaction and investments.

Practical implications

Given the predictive power of satisfaction to explain commitment, understanding the specific rewards and costs experienced by this population can give administrators ideas for making the part-time position more appealing. Similarly, given the predictive power of investments, administrators might consider identifying avenues for adjunct faculty to contribute to the department and university in a meaningful and rewarding way.

Originality/value

Universities are increasingly dependent on adjunct instructors, so it is worthwhile to understand the experience of such faculty. This is best done through research, rather than relying on assumptions, stereotype or anecdotes.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Laura Lunsford, Vicki Baker and Meghan Pifer

The purpose of this paper is to understand faculty mentoring experiences across career stages and the influence of mentoring relationship quality on job satisfaction. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand faculty mentoring experiences across career stages and the influence of mentoring relationship quality on job satisfaction. The study participants were faculty members from a consortium of liberal arts colleges in the USA. The theoretical lens draws from scholarship on career stages, developmental networks, and working alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a subset of 415 faculty member responses about mentoring from a larger data set on faculty development. The online survey was conducted in Spring 2014. Frequencies, χ2, regression equations, and confirmatory factor analysis were computed using R statistical software.

Findings

Over half the faculty members were both mentors and protégés; although, a sizable minority of faculty members did not engage in mentoring. Early-career faculty members were significantly more likely to have a mentor than were mid- or late-career faculty members. For both mentors and protégés, the higher they rated the quality of the mentoring relationship, the more job satisfaction they reported; this finding was greatest for mid-career (associate rank) faculty members. Participants reported significantly higher relationship quality with their mentors than with their protégés.

Research limitations/implications

The results may not generalize to faculty members who work at other institution types, for example, research-intensive or two-year schools, or to non-US higher education contexts. Statements made regarding those who do not participate in mentoring are speculative on the part of the authors.

Practical implications

Institutions may need to develop support for faculty members who may not desire to engage in mentoring. More attention may be warranted to create individual and institutional supports focused on high-quality mentoring.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on mentoring by establishing that many employees serve in mentor and protégé roles simultaneously. Further, employees engage in mentoring relationships across career stages as mentors and as protégés. The authors developed a reliable measure of mentoring relationship quality that may be used in future mentoring studies. Higher quality mentoring relationships were associated with significantly greater job satisfaction.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Leafy Tu, Michel Plaisent, Prosper Bernard and Lassana Maguiraga

The study aims to examine the age differences of job satisfaction between Taiwanese and Chinese higher education faculty.

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2603

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the age differences of job satisfaction between Taiwanese and Chinese higher education faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

The data on job satisfaction were obtained from 194 Taiwanese faculty and 211 Chinese faculty at college levels in one city.

Findings

No statistically significant differences were found for full‐time Taiwanese and Chinese faculty in the overall job satisfaction of age at higher education after educational reforms, but differences exist between countries.

Originality/value

This article applies to strategies on job satisfaction for the current Taiwanese and Chinese faculty at colleges.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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