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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Chirag Shah, Chathra Hendahewa and Roberto González-Ibáñez

The purpose of this paper is to investigate when and how people working collaboratively could be assisted in a fact-finding task, specifically focusing on team size and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate when and how people working collaboratively could be assisted in a fact-finding task, specifically focusing on team size and its effect on the outcomes of such a task. This is a follow-up to a previously published study that examined exploratory search tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigates the effects of team size on fact-finding tasks using a lab study involving 68 participants – 12 individuals, ten dyads, and 12 triads. The evaluation framework developed in the preceding work is used to compare the findings with respect to the earlier traditional exploratory task (Task 1) and the complex fact-finding task reported here (Task 2), with task type being the only difference.

Findings

The analyses of the user study data show that while adding more people to an exploratory search task could be beneficial in terms of efficiency and effectiveness, such findings do not apply in a complex fact-finding task. Indeed, results showed that the individuals were more efficient and effective doing Task 2 than they were in Task 1. Moreover, they outperformed the dyads and triads in Task 2 with respect to these two measures, which relate to the coverage of useful information and its relation to the expression of information needs. If the total time taken by each team is disregarded, the dyads and triads did better than the individuals in answering the fact-finding questions. But considering the time effect, this performance boost does not keep up with the increased group size.

Originality/value

The findings shed light not only on when, how, and why certain collaborations become successful, but also how team size affects specific aspects of information seeking, including information exposure, information relevancy, information search, and performance. This has implications for system designers, information managers, and educators. The presented work is novel in that it is the first empirical work to show the difference in individual and collaborative work (by dyads and triads) between exploratory and fact-finding tasks.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Cecilia Andersson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of Google in everyday online searching activities of Swedish teenagers in different contexts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of Google in everyday online searching activities of Swedish teenagers in different contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and material has been produced through interviews and observations in two different schools with participants aged 15-16. Goffman’s frame analysis provides the analytical lens for studying how activities are assigned meaning.

Findings

Three different framings in relation to using Google and googling are identified in the material: Google and fact-finding, Google as a neutral infrastructure, and Google as an authority. There is an interplay between activity, context, and interaction in defining the role of Google. In relation to school, the fact-finding framing is more pronounced whereas the infrastructure framing comes forth more in their free time activities. The authority framing cuts across both framings and underpins their trust in the search engine.

Originality/value

The study addresses the way that Google is embedded in online activities and how the search engine is viewed in various contexts, as well as how it is made invisible in some contexts. Previous research has not addressed Google’s role in specific in relation to various everyday uses.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

MARC EGERTON

This paper seeks to analyse the work of data gathering and to direct attention to some aspects of the exercise which might not be appreciated at all limes by the…

Abstract

This paper seeks to analyse the work of data gathering and to direct attention to some aspects of the exercise which might not be appreciated at all limes by the consultant, or even, occasionally, by a regulatory inspector. Nine aspects of ‘the fact find’ are addressed in detail: — the role of the fact find — whether or not the client should sign the fact find — whether or not recommendations should be signed by the client — the design of the fact find — verification of the fact find — specialist situations — the Data Protection Act — fact finding computerised systems — pension transfers and opt outs.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Yung-Cheng Shen, Crystal T. Lee, Ling-Yen Pan and Chung-Yuan Lee

Dealing with online rumors or fake information on social media is growing in importance. Most academic research on online rumors has approached the issue from a…

Abstract

Purpose

Dealing with online rumors or fake information on social media is growing in importance. Most academic research on online rumors has approached the issue from a quantitative modeling perspective. Less attention has been paid to the psychological mechanisms accounting for online rumor transmission behavior on the individual level. Drawing from the theory of stimulus–organism–response, this study aims to explore the nature of online rumors and investigate how the informational characteristics of online rumors are processed through the mediation of psychological variables to promote online rumor forwarding.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental approach to this issue was taken; the researchers investigated how the informational characteristics of online rumors and the psychological mediators promote online rumor transmission.

Findings

Four information characteristics (sense-making, funniness, dreadfulness and personal relevance) and three psychological motivators (fact-finding, relationship enhancement and self-enhancement) promote online rumor-forwarding behavior.

Originality/value

Because any online rumor transmitted on social media can go viral, companies may eventually encounter social media-driven crises. Thus, understanding what drives rumor-forwarding behavior can help marketers mitigate and counter online rumors.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2011

Jenell M. Johnson and Melissa M. Littlefield

Recent years have seen an explosion in research by scholars from the social sciences and humanities who apply neuroscience to research in their home disciplines. One way…

Abstract

Recent years have seen an explosion in research by scholars from the social sciences and humanities who apply neuroscience to research in their home disciplines. One way these ‘neuroscholars’ have engaged in conversations with neuroscience is by incorporating books of popular neuroscience into their work. This chapter explores some of the textual changes that result from the translation of neuroscience to popular neuroscience, and through rhetorical analysis, examines how popular neuroscience is used to support claims in emerging disciplines like neuroeconomics, neuroliterary criticism, neurolaw, and neuroeducation. An examination of scholarship from several disciplines – including sociology – reveals that popular neuroscience is often marshaled not as a translation or accommodation of science, but as science itself via two primary rhetorical strategies we have termed ‘fact finding’ and ‘theory building.’

Details

Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-881-6

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Donald E. Conlon, Christopher J. Meyer, Anne L. Lytle and Harold W. Willaby

In this article, we focus on alternative dispute resolution procedures, in particular third party procedures. We describe eight different procedures and provide examples…

Abstract

In this article, we focus on alternative dispute resolution procedures, in particular third party procedures. We describe eight different procedures and provide examples of how these procedures are used in different cultural contexts. We then evaluate the procedures in terms of how they impact four key criteria that have been noted in the literature related to negotiation: process criteria, settlement criteria, issue-related criteria, and relationship criteria. We subsequently explore the potential impact of culture on evaluations of these criteria. We finish with a discussion of future directions for research and practice, emphasizing that procedural recommendations should be made carefully when the criteria for effectiveness and applicability are derived from US-centric research. In other words, there is not “one best choice” for third party procedures universal to the myriad cultures on our planet.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Jing Chen, Dan Wang, Quan Lu and Zeyuan Xu

With a mass of electronic multi-topic documents available, there is an increasing need for evaluating emerging analysis tools to help users and digital libraries analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

With a mass of electronic multi-topic documents available, there is an increasing need for evaluating emerging analysis tools to help users and digital libraries analyze these documents better. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction of THC-DAT, a within-document analysis tool, in reading a multi-topic document.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed related literature first, then performed a user-centered, comparative evaluation of two within-document analysis tools, THC-DAT and BOOKMARK. THC-DAT extracts a topic hierarchy tree using hierarchical latent Dirichlet allocation (hLDA) method and takes the context information into account. BOOKMARK provides similar functionality to the Table of Contents bookmarks in Adobe Reader. Three novel kinds of tasks were devised for participants to finish on two tools, with objective results to assess reading effectiveness and efficiency. And post-system questionnaires were employed to obtain participants’ subjective judgments about the tools.

Findings

The results confirm that THC-DAT is significantly more effective than BOOKMARK, while not inferior in efficiency. There is some evidence that suggests THC-DAT can slow down the process of approaching cognitive overload and improve users’ willingness to undertake difficult task. Based on qualitative data from questionnaires, the results indicate that users were more satisfied when using THC-DAT than BOOKMARK.

Practical implications

Adopting THC-DAT in digital libraries or electrical document reading systems contributes to promoting users’ reading performance, willingness to undertake difficult task and general satisfaction. Moreover, THC-DAT is of great value to addressing cognitive overload problem in the information retrieval field.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates a novel within-document analysis tool in analyzing a multi-topic document, and proved that this tool is superior to the benchmark in effectiveness and user satisfaction, and not inferior in efficiency.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Dania Bilal

Reports the key findings of a three‐part research project that examined the information seeking behaviour and success of 22 seventh grade science students in using the…

Abstract

Reports the key findings of a three‐part research project that examined the information seeking behaviour and success of 22 seventh grade science students in using the Web. Children used the Yahooligans! search engine/directory to locate information for three different types of search tasks: one assigned fact‐finding task, one assigned research‐oriented task, and one fully self‐generated task. Children’s information‐seeking behaviour was studied from the cognitive, affective, and physical perspectives. Both quantitative and qualitative inquiry methods were employed to collect the data. Children’s behaviour and success were compared on the three tasks. Children were more successful on the fully self‐generated task than the fact‐based and the research‐oriented tasks. Children experienced difficulty in using Yahooligans! Their inadequate knowledge of how to use the engine, their poor level of research skills, as well as the poor structure of Yahooligans! keyword searching all surfaced as problems. Implications for Web training and system design improvements are provided.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Teemu Ylikoski

To describe consumers’ heuristic and analytical searches for a pre‐purchase information acquisition, and to assess the correspondence of flexibility of information task…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe consumers’ heuristic and analytical searches for a pre‐purchase information acquisition, and to assess the correspondence of flexibility of information task and the information found with a search.

Design/methodology/approach

Propositions based on current research in web use and consumer studies. Tracked records of searches are used for descriptive analysis of transitional patterns in the data. Regression is used for statistical verification of the information provided by searches.

Findings

Consumer searches center on chaining events, indicating heavy reliance on hyperlink navigation between web sites. Formal searches are seldom used, although when employed, tend to have a high level of diagnosticity. The emphasis on heuristic behavior is logical, as the way consumer information is currently presented on the internet rewards for this type of behavior. Use of heuristic search increases the likelihood of access to flexibly presented information.

Research limitations/implications

Consumers favor heuristic trial‐and‐error searches even in focused fact‐finding search tasks, which are typically considered the domain of analytical seeking. Consumers seem to benefit most from apparently inefficient, reactive and heuristic searches, because these are more likely to provide information in a format that the consumer can adapt. Convenience sample limits generalizability of findings.

Originality/value

While there is an increasing body of knowledge concerning internet use for finding information, fewer studies have focused on consumer uses of the web in search. This paper provides new information of online consumers, an increasingly important topic.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Philip Atkinson

Discusses how a group of European manufacturing executives had the opportunity of seeing, first hand, the Japanese approach to TQM. Provides insights into their quality…

Abstract

Discusses how a group of European manufacturing executives had the opportunity of seeing, first hand, the Japanese approach to TQM. Provides insights into their quality practices and identifies the key to TQM elements common to all successful Japanese organizations. Describes the emphasis placed on increasing the average knowledge base of the workforce. Contends that Japanese companies have invested more resources in production engineering, documents, and TQM observations. Summarizes that the group learned a lot about TQ but recognised that this “way of life” may not be so easy to implement within their own plants.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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