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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Yigit Kazancoglu, Melisa Ozbiltekin Pala, Muruvvet Deniz Sezer, Sunil Luthra and Anil Kumar

The aim of this study is to evaluate Big Data Analytics (BDA) drivers in the context of food supply chains (FSC) for transition to a Circular Economy (CE) and Sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to evaluate Big Data Analytics (BDA) drivers in the context of food supply chains (FSC) for transition to a Circular Economy (CE) and Sustainable Operations Management (SOM).

Design/methodology/approach

Ten different BDA drivers in FSC are examined for transition to CE; these are Supply Chains (SC) Visibility, Operations Efficiency, Information Management and Technology, Collaborations between SC partners, Data-driven innovation, Demand management and Production Planning, Talent Management, Organizational Commitment, Management Team Capability and Governmental Incentive. An interpretive structural modelling (ISM) methodology is used to indicate the relationships between identified drivers to stimulate transition to CE and SOM. Drivers and pair-wise interactions between these drivers are developed by semi-structured interviews with a number of experts from industry and academia.

Findings

The results show that Information Management and Technology, Governmental Incentive and Management Team Capability drivers are classified as independent factors; Organizational Commitment and Operations Efficiency are categorized as dependent factors. SC Visibility, Data-driven innovation, Demand management and Production Planning, Talent Management and Collaborations between SC partners can be classified as linkage factors. It can be concluded that Governmental Incentive is the most fundamental driver to achieve BDA applications in FSC transition from linearity to CE and SOM. In addition, Operations Efficiency, Collaborations between SC partners and Organizational Commitment are key BDA drivers in FSC for transition to CE and SOM.

Research limitations/implications

The interactions between these drivers will provide benefits to both industry and academia in prioritizing and understanding these drivers more thoroughly when implementing BDA based on a range of factors. This study will provide valuable insights. The results from this study will help in drawing up regulations to prevent food fraud, implementing laws concerning government incentives, reducing food loss and waste, increasing tracing and traceability, providing training activities to improve knowledge about BDA and focusing more on data analytics.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the study is to analyze BDA drivers in the context of FSC for transition to CE and SOM. This study is unique in examining these BDA drivers based on FSC. We hope to find sustainable solutions to minimize losses or other negative impacts on these SC.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

William Cook, Esther Turnhout and Séverine van Bommel

The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) intends to promote responsible forestry through its certification scheme. The primary engine that drives this promotion is auditing…

Abstract

Purpose

The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) intends to promote responsible forestry through its certification scheme. The primary engine that drives this promotion is auditing. Audits serve a dual purpose: they make forest managers accountable for their claim of meeting the FSC standard, and they make the actions of auditors and auditee account-able, or able to be put into an account. The latter of these is rarely investigated, despite it being crucial to understanding how FSC audits are done.

Design/methodology/approach

This article examines FSC forest certification audits as practices where the FSC standards gain meaning. In-depth analysis of these practices enables insight into how different values related to forest certification and auditing are articulated and negotiated in practice, characterizing particular modes of auditing. In this paper, the authors examine the practices of FSC forest management auditors in multi-day audits in Africa and in Spain. Their materials were analyzed and coded using Goffman’s elements of dramaturgy.

Findings

The authors’ findings show that auditing practices entail a series of nested performances in which the auditors and auditees interact together and in which front stage and back stage performances constantly alternate as auditors and auditees perform for each other and simultaneously for an absent audience.

Originality/value

The authors’ analysis demonstrates how in these performances, professional values related to following auditing rules and ensuring that audits are rendered account-able in a particular way take a prominent position. This risks overshadowing the accountability of the FSC system which is ultimately grounded in its ambition to improve forest conservation and management.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Emmanuel Ferguson Aikins and Usha Ramanathan

The purpose of this paper is to empirically identify key factors of UK food supply chains (SCs) that significantly contribute to CO2 emissions (CO2e) taking into account…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically identify key factors of UK food supply chains (SCs) that significantly contribute to CO2 emissions (CO2e) taking into account the life cycle assessment (LCA). The UK food supply chain includes imports from other countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This research develops a conceptual framework from extant literature. Secondary data obtained from ONS and FAOSTAT covering from 1990 to 2014 are analysed using Multilinear Regression (MLR) and Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) to identify the factors relating to CO2 emissions significance, and the efficient contributions that are being made to their reduction in the UK food supply chains.

Findings

The study results suggest that Transportation and Sales/Distribution are the two key factors of CO2 emissions in UK food supply chains. This is confirmed by two multivariate methods, MLR and SFA. MLR results show that transportation increases UK CO2 emissions by 10 tonnes of CO2 emissions from one tonne of fruits and vegetables imports from overseas to the UK Sales and Distribution reduces the UK CO2 emissions by 1.3 tonnes of CO2 emissions due to improved, technological operation activities in the UK. In addition, the SFA results confirm that the key factors are sufficient to predict an increase or decrease in CO2 emissions in the UK food supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

This study has focused on the LCA of the UK food supply chain from limited data. Future studies should consider Sustainability Impact Assessment of the UK food supply chain, identifying the social, economic, regulatory and environmental impacts of the food supply chain using a re-defined LCA (all-inclusive assessment) tool.

Practical implications

This research suggests that food supply chain professionals should improve efficiency, e.g. the use of solar energy and biogas, and also integrate low-carbon policies and practices in food supply chain operations. Furthermore, governments should encourage policies such as mobility management programmes, urban redevelopment and privatisation to enhance better transportation systems and infrastructure to continuously reduce CO2e from the food trade.

Originality/value

Although logistics play a major role in CO2 emissions, all logistics CO2 emissions for other countries are not included in the ONS data. This research reveals some important insights into the UK food supply chains. Logistics and other food supply chain processes of importing countries significantly contribute to CO2 emissions which are yet to be considered in the UK food SCs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 15 April 2020

Janpriy Sharma, Mohit Tyagi and Arvind Bhardwaj

Presented work gives comparative review of food supply chain (FSC) under various notions related to its conceptualisation, operationality and technological advancements in

Abstract

Purpose

Presented work gives comparative review of food supply chain (FSC) under various notions related to its conceptualisation, operationality and technological advancements in lieu with Industry 4.0 revolution. In Indian scenario, the impression of FSC seems in a scattered way that cannot be directly useful for an organisation, to overcome this scattering, a framework has been developed to consolidate the previous research works and exploration of new trends in food supply chain management (FSCM) in context to Indian scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

This article encapsulates the essence of various research articles and reports retrieved from databases of Emerald and Elsevier's Science direct, clustering the various notions related to FSC in Indian context. To visualise the one-sight view of related works, a pictorial representations have also been appended.

Findings

This article explains the general aspect of FSC and its linkage in context to Indian system. Presented work outlays both empirical and theoretical approaches trending from last 15 years. As research count in context to Indian FSC is lacking, so this work will be a road map for expedition in direction of FSCM, in era of research.

Practical implications

Findings and suggestion in this work can expanded in various industries related to food, helping to turn their fortune and enrichment of Indian FSC.

Social implications

Food is binding word for all the commodities, and its effective supply chain management is a big boon for economy of country along with large employment generation for people directly/indirectly associated with this industry. This article covers a generalise approach from ground level framework to a level of advancement which fulfil technological aspects, future needs and upcoming trends in lieu to need of developing nation.

Originality/value

As limited research is done in Indian FSCM, this work to bridge this gap along with a well-defined framework which going to explore FSC. This work is going to be facilitation for researchers of this area as no major review for Indian context has not been published.

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Pichawadee Kittipanya‐ngam, Yongjiang Shi and Mike J. Gregory

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key influential factors and their implications on food supply chain (FSC) location decisions from a Thailand‐based manufacturer's view.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key influential factors and their implications on food supply chain (FSC) location decisions from a Thailand‐based manufacturer's view.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 21 case studies were conducted with eight Thailand‐based food manufacturers. In each case, key influential factors were observed along with their implications on upstream and downstream FSC location decisions. Data were collected through semi‐structured interviews and documentations. Data reduction and data display in tables were used to help data analysis of the case studies.

Findings

This exploratory research found that, in the food industry, FSC geographical dispersion pattern could be determined by four factors: perishability, value density, economic‐political forces, and technological forces. Technological forces were found as an enabler for FSC geographical dispersion whereas the other three factors could be both barriers and enablers. The implications of these four influential factors drive FSC towards four key patterns of FSC geographical dispersion: local supply chain (SC), supply‐proximity SC, market‐proximity SC, and international SC. Additionally, the strategy of the firm was found to also be an influential factor in determining FSC geographical dispersion.

Research limitations/implications

Despite conducting 21 cases, the findings in this research are based on a relatively small sample, given the large size of the industry. More case evidence from a broader range of food product market and supply items, particularly ones that have significantly different patterns of FSC geographical dispersions would have been insightful. The consideration of additional influential factors such as labour movement between developing countries, currency fluctuations and labour costs, would also enrich the framework as well as improve the quality and validity of the research findings. The different strategies employed by the case companies and their implications on FSC location decisions should also be further investigated along with cases outside Thailand, to provide a more comprehensive view of FSC geographical location decisions.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights how FSC is geographically located in both supply‐side and demand‐side from a manufacturing firm's view. The findings can also provide SC managers and researchers a better understanding of their FSCs.

Originality/value

This research bridges the existing gap in the literature, explaining the geographical dispersion of SC particularly in the food industry where the characteristics are very specific, by exploring the internationalization ability of Thailand‐based FSC and generalizing the key influential factors – perishability (lead time), value density, economic‐political forces, market opportunities, and technological advancements. Four key patterns of FSC internationalization emerged from the case studies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Mukesh Kumar, Jag Srai, Luke Pattinson and Mike Gregory

This paper presents a novel analysis of the UK food supply chains (FSC) within selected food product categories to reveal the drivers and changing patterns of the UK FSC

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a novel analysis of the UK food supply chains (FSC) within selected food product categories to reveal the drivers and changing patterns of the UK FSC structures. It demonstrates how the dynamics of different food sectors are changing and how structural changes are affecting the activities of actors within the FSC – an area which is not significantly addressed in the academic literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a sector mapping approach to analyse food product supply chains, associated industrial actors and institutional support players. Data sources include publicly available industrial reports, literature reviews and case studies involving semi‐structured interviews with key industrial players. The methodology involved an examination of relevant literature and government statistics to inform a set of “basic” maps detailing the structure of the UK FSC. Key actors were subsequently identified and interviewed and the data were combined with the “basic” maps to create a set of “current” maps of the structure of the UK FSC. A textual analysis of the data from interviews was then used to identify key trends and structural changes occurring within the UK FSC. These changes were used to inform a set of “future” UK FSC maps. Finally, the data from the interviews was analysed to identify key trends in UK FSC.

Key findings

Use of a novel approach establishes the linkage between primary stakeholders, secondary stakeholders, supply‐chain processes, value chain activities and key industrial players in three product categories – dairy, fruit and vegetables and staples. Key findings include trends of consolidation of upstream actors, retailers moving into processing, Changing product architecture, demand for higher visibility and greater visibility driven by consumer demand for provenance.

Originality/value

This paper brings together fragmented literature from multiple sources, government statistics and data from key actors in the UK FSC to form a picture of the structure of the UK FSC. Where before, literature on the structure of the UK FSC was fragmented and outdated, this paper contains an up‐to‐date model of the current structure of the UK FSC that has been validated in accordance with expert opinion. Furthermore, this paper shows how the dynamics of different food sectors are changing and how structural changes are affecting the activities of actors within the FSC.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Book part
Publication date: 17 November 2003

B.Anthony Billings, Gary A. McGill and Mbodja Mougoué

This article examines the sensitivity of U.S. exports to the availability of export incentives offered under the Domestic International Sales Corporation (DISC) and the…

Abstract

This article examines the sensitivity of U.S. exports to the availability of export incentives offered under the Domestic International Sales Corporation (DISC) and the Foreign Sales Corporation (FSC) provisions of U.S. tax law. Evidence on the efficacy of export tax incentives is mixed. The history of the DISC/FSC tax incentives provides a natural experiment to address the question of the effect of tax incentives on export volume. We examine the relation of U.S. export volume to the availability of these export tax incentives from 1967 to 1998, controlling for product class and important macroeconomic variables, and find evidence of a positive association between the level of U.S. exports and the existence of the export incentives offered under the DISC/FSC provisions. However, this association depends on product type. Our findings using actual export data are independent of otherwise available data demonstrating a general growth in the use of DISC/FSC entities and the sales volume of these entities. The latter data suffer from an interpretation problem because changes in the number of special export entities used and their sales volume do not necessarily correlate with changes in actual export levels over time. The approach we use in this study is an attempt to overcome this limitation. The reported results have implications for both tax policy regarding the design of export tax incentives and the European Union’s claim that U.S. export tax incentives have damaged U.S. competitors in foreign trade.

Details

Advances in Taxation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-065-4

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Janpriy Sharma, Mohit Tyagi and Arvind Bhardwaj

Outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has created the catastrophic situation, it has crippled all the economic activities and seized off the operations of food supply chain …

Abstract

Purpose

Outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has created the catastrophic situation, it has crippled all the economic activities and seized off the operations of food supply chain (FSC). Disrupted FSC escalated the societal concerns related to food safety and security. The purpose of this study is to consolidate various issues, exploring the perspectives associated with the agricultural practices, food industries and society concerns related with the FSC performance system dynamics amid of COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

To structure this work, a detailed research literature insight focussing on the key findings associated with the past disease outbreaks like influenza, avian flu, Ebola, bird flu, SARS, foot and mouth disease and ongoing phase of COVID-19, encompassing the perspective related with various agricultural and concerned supply chain practices is clustered. Furthermore, issues having relevancy with the notion of this work, sourced from platforms of print and electronic media have been incorporated to ground the reality associated with the impacts, for better visualisation of the perspectives.

Findings

This study outlays the key findings which are relevant with the past pandemic outbreaks from the core of the research literature. It details the impact of the current COVID-19 scenario on the various FSC operations, focussing on dimensions allied with the industry, economic and society concerns. For the same, to mitigate the effects, relief measures focussing on the short- and long-term perspectives have been incorporated. Steps ramped up by the Government of India (GOI) to safeguard masses from the threat of food security, accelerate pace of the FSC operations and upscale operating capacities of the industries and agriculture practices have incorporated.

Research limitations/implications

Presented work is persuaded amid of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions hence it outlays the theoretical perspectives only. But, these perspectives portray the ongoing scenario's impacts, extending its implication to the people coming from the industry and academia background. This study can felicitate the government bodies to make them familiar with the various impacts which indented the FSCs, food industries and added woes to the society concerns.

Originality/value

India is the second largest populated nation of the world, and outspread of the COVID-19 has capsized the FSCs and raised the various instances, making population vulnerable to the threats of food insecurity. This study encompasses effect of the FSC disruption by incorporating its effect on the food industries practices, societal issues and extending possible relief measures to restructure the FSC dynamics. As of now, study focussing on the Indian FSC concerns, detailing of impacts due to pandemic outbreak, relief measures to sail out of the hard times are not available.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Rishabh Rathore, J. J. Thakkar and J. K. Jha

This paper investigates the risks involved in the Indian foodgrain supply chain (FSC) and proposes risk mitigation taxonomy to enable decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the risks involved in the Indian foodgrain supply chain (FSC) and proposes risk mitigation taxonomy to enable decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) for risk estimation. In the traditional FMEA, risk priority number (RPN) is evaluated by multiplying the probability of occurrence, severity and detection. Because of some drawbacks of the traditional FMEA, instead of calculating RPN, this paper prioritizes the FSC risk factors using fuzzy VIKOR. VIKOR is a multiple attribute decision-making technique which aims to rank FSC risk factors with respect to criteria.

Findings

The findings indicate that “technological risk” has a higher impact on the FSC, followed by natural disaster, communication failure, non-availability of procurement centers, malfunctioning in PDS and inadequate storage facility. Sensitivity analysis is performed to check the robustness of the results.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study can help in deriving detailed risk mitigation strategy and risk mitigation taxonomy for the improved resilience of FSC.

Originality/value

Specifically, this research investigates the risks for foodgrains supply chain system for a developing country such as India, an area which has received limited attention in the present literature.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Roopanand Mahadew and Bhavna Luchmun

This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the sphere of corporate failure in Mauritius. The causes are explained and urge to take preventive measures is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the sphere of corporate failure in Mauritius. The causes are explained and urge to take preventive measures is justified therein. Recommendations are finally proposed to prevent corporate failure in Mauritius.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used is based on a mixture of the legal research method and case study analysis. This paper analyses every legal instrument such as enactments, binding rules, regulations and guidelines relevant to the Financial Services Commission (FSC) and the insurance sector in Mauritius.

Findings

The prudential approach by the FSC is on the basis of any attempt for preventing corporate failure in Mauritius. However, there is still room for improvement with amendments that can be brought to various stages, such as the licensing, compliance and regulation stage.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of research limitation, this is an area that is quite new in Mauritius, implying that literature would mostly be indirect in nature. However, it has a high implication as it positions itself as one of the first pieces of literature on the issue of corporate failure in Mauritius. It can be the beginning of a long and required series of literature much needed in the field.

Practical implications

The effectiveness of the regulatory power of the FSC is essential for the financial sector’s future of Mauritius. The amendments that are proposed thought this study would help to immediately improve the health of this essential sector.

Social implications

It posits the business world as an area in which the social impacts are significant. The social implications would be towards researchers, students, practitioners and policymaker. Also, it is a piece of research that would be important for investors who would want to invest in the financial sectors in Mauritius.

Originality/value

This paper will be highly instrumental to policymakers, regulatory authorities, international investors and local businessmen wishing to enter the financial services sector to have a better idea of how this very important pillar of the economy of Mauritius can be shielded better against failure and how it can be enhanced to promote the economic growth of Mauritius.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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