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FREDERICK NIVEN

RECENTLY, visiting Honolulu, it all came back to my mind clearly. I had gone out to the famous Diamond Head for two reasons: I wanted to have a good view of the China…

Abstract

RECENTLY, visiting Honolulu, it all came back to my mind clearly. I had gone out to the famous Diamond Head for two reasons: I wanted to have a good view of the China Clipper sailing over, on the last lap of her trans‐Pacific flight, from Hawaii to California; and to see Diamond Head lighthouse for Stevenson's sake, as it was there that he made Loudon Dodd, in The Wrecker, meet a sailor from a man‐of‐war who inadvertently gave him some information regarding the mystery of that story. For Stevenson's sake also I had gone to Waikiki, a changed Waikiki from his day. The banyan‐tree in the shade of which he used to sit is surrounded by bungalows. A metal plate, commemorative of him and of his young friend the Princess Kaiulani has been placed on the tree by the Daughters of Hawaii.

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Library Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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FREDERICK NIVEN

I SAW him only once—and that was in Edinburgh, thirty‐seven years ago. He had just arrived (as I heard later from one who knew him, and to whom I announced with youthful…

Abstract

I SAW him only once—and that was in Edinburgh, thirty‐seven years ago. He had just arrived (as I heard later from one who knew him, and to whom I announced with youthful joy my glimpse of him) from St. Andrews, had been examining the bookshops, book‐dips, in the neighbourhood of the University and, with an armful of volumes, was returning from the auld toon to the new one on his way to Mackay and Chisholm's in Princes Street to buy an opal ring.

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Library Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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FREDERICK NIVEN

THE name is arresting, like the personality for which it stands. Cunninghame Graham: Lavery's equestrian portrait of him conveys the essential man as revealed in his…

Abstract

THE name is arresting, like the personality for which it stands. Cunninghame Graham: Lavery's equestrian portrait of him conveys the essential man as revealed in his writings, though the other one (somewhat reminiscent of Raeburn's Sir John Sinclair), which presents him to us afoot, lacks nothing save a horse for company. He has a passion for horses and has written many an essay in which they are leading characters and one book devoted to them—The Horses of the Conquest. William Rothenstein has recorded him in lithograph and in oils and in Men and Memories includes a reproduction of a painting of him in fencer's garb. Belcher did a charcoal drawing of him—it appeared in Punch—with a lightly indicated background of Hyde Park Corner and a horse or two, in a dexterous mere line or two, clipping past. There is a word‐picture of him in the epilogue to Bernard Shaw's Captain Brassbound's Conversion and another in George Moore's Conversations in Ebury Street. Writer, Scots laird, Spanish hidalgo, South American ranch‐owner, he has ridden and bivouaced in Texas and Patagonia and may be found this month in Morocco, next month in London, or in Venezuela, or enjoying a braw day (or a snell day for that matter) in Perthshire.

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Library Review, vol. 3 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Frederick Niven

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make…

Abstract

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make one aware of how “the sunrise blooms and withers on the hill.” I might best begin with the return of my people from South America to Glasgow (beloved by them) where, I recall, I was long homesick for the land of my birth. Charles Darwin, visiting my native country, Chile, was impressed chiefly by its sunshine, the visibility there, the keen clarity of its atmosphere. Though in time I learned to love Glasgow it seemed, in comparison, smoky.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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JOHN MALCOLM BULLOCH

MR. Frederick Niven's recent references in these pages to the Canterbury Poets anthology of ballades and rondeaus suddenly reminded me that a rondeau of my own was printed…

Abstract

MR. Frederick Niven's recent references in these pages to the Canterbury Poets anthology of ballades and rondeaus suddenly reminded me that a rondeau of my own was printed in the little book. Although the year 1887, when the book, which is now rather difficult to pick up, appeared, is a long way off, I do not in the least feel like Methuselah. What, however, does lend a sense of the passing years is the change in literary taste, and the humpty‐dumptying by one generation of critics of the heroes of an older group. We have had a good opportunity of witnessing the process on a wholesale scale in the belittling of the Victorians, and Henley himself is a peculiarly ironic example of the process, for, having bludgeoned many literary reputations, his own has slumped, for the collected edition of his work which appeared a few years ago left the younger school of critics cold, while the influence of his rather truculent “young men” on the Scots Observer has faded.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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FREDERICK NIVEN

THE Editor of LIBRARY REVIEW asked me, some time ago, as a Scot abroad, to write something for his readers at home regarding books, and the reading of books, in the land…

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THE Editor of LIBRARY REVIEW asked me, some time ago, as a Scot abroad, to write something for his readers at home regarding books, and the reading of books, in the land where I am at present—Canada.

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Library Review, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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FREDERICK NIVEN

MOST of us sometimes, I suppose, observe some small boy engrossed upon his youthful affairs and wonder what he'll become, what he'll make of himself or what life will make…

Abstract

MOST of us sometimes, I suppose, observe some small boy engrossed upon his youthful affairs and wonder what he'll become, what he'll make of himself or what life will make of him, and what sort of man he will be to look upon, after forty years. W. E. Henley has left us a self‐portrait of himself when young, topped by a broad‐ribanded leghorn, “antic in girlish broideries” and wearing “silly little shoes with straps,” carrying home a great treasure, a book—a Book with “agitating cuts of ghouls and genies;” and, for back‐ground to that picture from memory of the boy he was, are the docks of Gloucester thronged with galliots and luggers, brigantines and barques that came in those days “to her very doorsteps and geraniums.”

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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NEWTON MOHUN DUTT

I HAVE been asked by the Editor to give my reminiscences of the modern library movement in India. H. H. The Maharaja Gaekwar of Baroda, the pioneer of that movement, was…

Abstract

I HAVE been asked by the Editor to give my reminiscences of the modern library movement in India. H. H. The Maharaja Gaekwar of Baroda, the pioneer of that movement, was responsible for arousing my interest in the subject. In an interview which I had with him in London in 1910, learning that I was keenly interested in education, and had for twenty‐five years been in the service of eminent English publishing houses, he informed me that free and compulsory education had been in existence in Baroda for some years, and that he had recently engaged an American library expert to inaugurate in his dominions a system of public libraries. Three years later the Maharaja asked me to join his Library Department, and I arrived in Baroda in December, 1913. Mr. W. A. Borden, the American librarian, had returned home, and Mr. J. S. Kudalkar, his designated successor, had been sent to study library conditions and services abroad.

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Library Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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G.W. STONIER

ONCE the shyest and most elusive of mortals—member of no trade union or craft—a lonely figure in drawing‐rooms and in the quietness of the London Library—the Reviewer…

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ONCE the shyest and most elusive of mortals—member of no trade union or craft—a lonely figure in drawing‐rooms and in the quietness of the London Library—the Reviewer (like some defaulting country parson) finds himself suddenly dragged into court and starred for attention. The public is looking on! The press are there, sniffing out a scandal! “This wretched man,” the prosecution begins. Alas (it soon appears), he's a bad lot: he belongs to the Monstrous Regiment of Reviewers.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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ARTHUR R. HEWITT

RELINQUISHMENT of powers under the Acts to the Council of the County is permitted in England, Northern Ireland and the Irish Free State. In England any library authority…

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RELINQUISHMENT of powers under the Acts to the Council of the County is permitted in England, Northern Ireland and the Irish Free State. In England any library authority, not being a county borough may, on such terms as may be agreed upon and with the approval of the Board of Education, relinquish their powers and duties to the county council. In Northern Ireland the council or commissioners of any urban district or town may, on terms agreed upon and approved by the Ministry of Home Affairs, relinquish their powers and duties. In the Irish Free State the council of any urban district may, on terms agreed upon and with the approval of the Minister for Local Government, relinquish their powers and duties. In each case all property, rights and liabilities are transferred to, and become vested in, the county council. Relinquishment of powers to county councils in Scotland is not provided for in the Acts and, as has already been mentioned, those authorities occupy a different position with regard to libraries from counties in England and Ireland.

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Library Review, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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